Gear Nerd: Why You Should Be Wearing Merino Wool Year-Round

It’s not terribly often we get to go full science nerd on here, but today we’re digging into the most magical material of them all: merino wool. It’s natural. It’s renewable. And it’s oh so comfortable. But why is it so comfortable, versatile, and fantastic?

Unsurprisingly, merino wool comes from merino sheep. While we don’t exactly know how these fluffy little magical wool makers happened (they likely originated in Morocco or Spain and are definitely a domesticated breed), but we do know that they are the bearers of the softest wool of them all.

The detailed science behind merino would take a lot of articles to explain, but the general gist is that the strands that make up merino wool are much thinner than traditional wool. This means we can achieve a much finer weave than traditional wool and take advantage of all the other perks: it’s light weight, softness to the touch, amazing moisture management, and odor resistance.

Courtesy: CSIRO

The Merino Wool Matrix

But we have a feeling you came here to nerd out, so let’s briefly get into it.

If you were to break out your microscope (you do have one, right?) and some super cool microscopic cutting tools, you’d discover that merino wool has an exterior called “cuticle cells”. These cells have a slightly waxy coating which is what allows the strands to both shed water and absorb vapor. If you dig in further, you get to the “cortical cells.” These cells are like little tiny springs that allow merino to be flexible, elastic, and wrinkle free. And even further in, you hit the “matrix.” This contains proteins that love water molecules; So much so that they can absorb up to 35 percent of their weight without feeling wet (in your face, cotton). This region is kind of the coolest section of them all as it is why merino wool is fire resistant, anti-static, and eats odors for lunch.

Feel smarter? Us too.

 

Wool Mythbusting

With all that being said, it makes a lot more sense now why merino wool is the ideal material for all four seasons. But in the event you’re still not convinced that it’s the most magical material and are going but “Wool is itchy! And only for winter! And smells weird!” we’re going to bust all those myths… with science.

“Wool is itchy.” Under normal circumstances, we’d agree with you and suffer through flashbacks to those sweaters grandma knit one year for Christmas. But merino wool is different because it’s actually thinner than your own hair. And because it’s so thin, it bends out of the way when it encounters your skin meaning you just feel nice soft material from some super fluffy happy sheep instead of being stabbed by rogue traditional wool. Busted.

“Wool is just for winter.” Psh. Nope! Unless you’re in the “I don’t sweat, I glisten” crowd, we all sweat year round. And getting sweat away from our skin ASAP feels lovely all year, which is where merino excels thanks to that whole cuticle cell and matrix thing no matter the season. Removing moisture from our skin helps us regulate our temperature and keep comfortable. Being hot, sweaty, and stuck in a sticky damp material? Not so comfortable and not going to help regulate your body temperature. Interestingly enough, this same scientific aspect is why merino wool is also your safer bet during the winter when sweating. Being cold and damp is flat out dangerous (ever hear someone say “cotton kills”?), so we recommend rocking merino year round.

“Wool smells weird when wet.” We all know that musty smell you’re thinking about, but once again going back to the matrix, merino wool eats odors including whatever it puts off… and what you put off. That means that you can skip smelling like a wet (traditional) sheep and a locker room. Your friends will thank you.

And so concludes our nerd session. Give merino a try. And thank a sheep.

 


Alpha Guide: Hiking Acadia's Precipice Trail

alpha Guides | Better than beta.

Challenging and exposed with views for days, Acadia National Park’s Precipice Trail is mile-for-mile one of the best hikes in New England.

If there’s one trail in Acadia National Park you’ve heard about, it’s likely the Precipice Trail. It’s as “Acadian” an experience as viewing the sunrise from the summit of Cadillac Mountain, getting popovers at the Jordan Pond House, or consuming an unreasonable quantity of lobster rolls. At only 0.9 miles long it’s a short trail, but its renown—or notoriety, or even infamy—is about three things: the challenge, the exposure, and the views.

The challenge is clear: in those 0.9 miles, the Precipice Trail gains over 1,000 feet in elevation. As for exposure, the upper reaches of the trail ascend an open, airy, nearly-vertical cliff face. And, finally, for the views Champlain Mountain’s bare east face affords hikers a sweeping view of Frenchman Bay, Schoodic Peninsula, and the Atlantic Ocean. It’s also a ladder trail, using a strategically-placed—and extremely fun—combination of iron rungs, railings, and ladders to aid hikers to the top, making it a challenge for even the most experienced hikers.

Quick Facts

Distance: 2.5 miles, loop
Time to Complete: Half day for most.
Difficulty: ★★★★
Scenery:★★★★★


Season: Mid-August through mid-October
Fees/Permits: $30/vehicle park entry
Contact: https://www.nps.gov/acad/

Download file: Precipice_Trail.gpx

Turn-By-Turn

From Bangor, head east on I-395. Take exit 6A for US-1A, following the signs for Ellsworth, Bar Harbor. After 24 miles, continue straight onto ME-3 east. Keep on ME-3 for another 18.5 miles. From here, continue straight into Kebo Street until you reach the Park Loop Road in another mile. Turn left onto the Park Loop Road—the Precipice Trailhead’s parking area (44.34949, -68.18811) will be on your right in 2.7 miles.

Iron rungs mark the route on the upper reaches of the Precipice Trail. | Credit: John Lepak
Iron rungs mark the route on the upper reaches of the Precipice Trail. | Credit: John Lepak

Precipice Trail

The Precipice Trail wastes no time getting down to business. Begin following the blue blazes up a concrete staircase and a moderately steep stone slab to an unmissable collection of NPS signage right on the trail. They’re warning would-be hikers of the challenge that awaits them, and they’re not kidding—the Precipice Trail is steep, exposed and absolutely not for folks who can’t handle heights or who aren’t prepared for a workout. Don’t let the short mileage fool you, this hike will get your blood pumping.

At 0.1 miles, the Precipice Trail presents its first iron aids: two rungs, mounted directly into the rock, on opposite sides of a left-facing corner. The rock is about six feet tall, and flat atop, with a third piece of iron—a handrail—just within reach. This is one of the more awkward moves on the trail, and its position a tenth of a mile in can’t be a coincidence—this is a test. A taste of what’s to come, and a final opportunity for hikers to reassess their decision. Take your time, trust your feet, and pull yourself up—it’ll be worth it later.

From here, the route comes out of the shade and enters a boulder field. Continue heading up, following the blue blazes and negotiating the boulders all along the way. At one point in this section, the trail actually ducks under two huge boulders before continuing on up over a wood bridge and some stone steps before it’s junction with the Orange and Black Path at 0.4 miles (44.35151, -68.18972).

Here’s where the Precipice Trail really kicks into high gear. The route follows an obvious system of cracks, corners, and ledges up a nearly vertical face—made passable by the placement of several iron rungs, railings, and ladders. Continue southeast, using the rungs and railings to take on short (but tricky) scrambles. As you get higher, these sections become more frequent until at mile 0.6 they blend together into one long mountainside jungle gym.

The going will likely be slow—this is a popular hike and it can be difficult (if not impossible) to pass slower parties. Take in the view, catch your breath, and enjoy it.

Eventually, the mountain will run out of curveballs to throw at you and at 0.8 miles, the trail levels out and opens up with panoramic easterly views. Keep following the blue blazes to one final ladder–scramble combo and gain the summit of Champlain Mountain at mile 0.9 (44.35083, -68.19401).

A view of Frenchman Bay and the Porcupine Islands while descending Champlain’s North Ridge. | Credit: John Lepak
A view of Frenchman Bay and the Porcupine Islands while descending Champlain’s North Ridge. | Credit: John Lepak

Champlain North Ridge Trail

In addition to marking the high point of the mountain, Champlain’s summit marker also marks the confluence of four trails: the Precipice Trail to the east, the Champlain South Ridge Trail to the south, the Beachcroft Path to the northwest, and the Champlain North Ridge Trail to the north. Each trail terminates at a different trailhead on opposite sides of the mountain, so find the Champlain North Ridge Trail and proceed carefully.

Descending this trail is incredibly pleasant: wide open views, massive granite slabs, and the occasional stand of pitch pines—a characteristically Acadian summit scene. Bar Harbor, Frenchman Bay, and the Porcupine Islands set the scene as you follow the cairns down, and the trees close in again. After the Precipice Trail, the Champlain North Ridge is downright leisurely. Enjoy it while it lasts—at 1.5 miles, when the trail meets up with the Orange and Black Path (44.35779, -68.19184), the work resumes.

Narrow stone steps and some scrambling are a reminder that you’re not out of the woods yet on the Orange and Black Path. | Credit: John Lepak
Narrow stone steps and some scrambling are a reminder that you’re not out of the woods yet on the Orange and Black Path. | Credit: John Lepak

Orange and Black Path

From its junction with the Champlain North Ridge Trail, the Orange and Black Path reverses course and heads south along Champlain’s steep eastern slopes. Though not as aesthetic as the Precipice Trail, the Orange and Black Path also packs a lot of value into a short distance, with plenty of elevation left to gain.

At 1.7 miles (44.35662, -68.19098) the trail splits: to the left (east), it descends to the Park Loop Road; to the right, it continues south, around the mountain, to its junction with the Precipice Trail. Should you not feel up to taking the first half of the Precipice Trail back down, here’s your bailout point. Head left for 0.1 miles to the Park Loop Road, turn right, and walk 0.6 miles back to the Precipice Trail parking area.

Proceeding to the right, though a bit more of a challenge, will avoid the roadwalk and will take you down a lovely bit of trail, replete with tricky scrambles and cool stone staircases, some cut into the rock, just wide enough to squeeze through. There’s what feels like a whole lot of up and down, but you’re essentially following a contour line back to the Precipice Trail, which you’ll hit at 2.1 miles.

The boulder field marks the beginning (and the end) of the Precipice Trail’s more challenging terrain. | Credit: John Lepak
The boulder field marks the beginning (and the end) of the Precipice Trail’s more challenging terrain. | Credit: John Lepak

Precipice Trail (Reprise)

Head left from the trail junction and retrace your steps back to the parking area. The terrain is familiar, but you’ll be hiking against the tide, so be prepared to wait for uphill traffic where the trail bottlenecks. Take the time to enjoy the views and catch your breath because, at 2.5 miles, it’s over before you know it and you’re back in the parking area.


Credit: John Lepak
Credit: John Lepak

The Kit

  • The Precipice Trail is not officially listed as a hiking trail, but rather as a “non-technical climbing route,” and while trail runners or hiking boots will do the trick, a good pair of approach shoes, like the Scarpa Crux (men/women) will have you stepping with confidence on iron rung and granite slab alike.
  • This hike is a bit like a European via ferrata route and, like a via ferrata, it’s not a bad idea to use a pair of gloves. Try the Petzl Cordex Belay Gloves—they’re comfortable, dextrous, and will keep your hands from getting shredded.
  • At 2.5 miles, this isn’t the longest hike, but it is on an easterly face and can get hot on a sunny day. Make sure you have water—if it comes in the form of a hands-free hydration pack like the Salomon Agile 6 Set Hydration Pack, even better.
  • There are narrow ledges and scrambles on this trail where social distancing is simply not possible, so bring a face covering, like the Buff Original Neck Gaiter, the EMS Heritage Bandana, or the Hanes Face Mask.
  • Acadia has miles and miles of trails, and even though the Precipice is a shorty, getting lost is still possible and would be a real bummer. Bring the National Geographic Acadia National Park Map and make sure you’re going where you want to be going.

Credit: John Lepak
Credit: John Lepak

Keys to the Trip

  • The National Park Service regularly closes the Precipice Trail to protect resident peregrine falcons, a Maine endangered species, during their mating and nesting seasons. This typically lasts from March to mid-August and the fines—and incredibly bad karma—for violating the closure are steep. Be sure to check the NPS website for up-to-date information.
  • Acadia is regularly one of the most visited parks in the National Park system and the Precipice Trail is one of its main attractions—it draws a crowd. Go early, go late, or go prepared for company.
  • Bar Harbor is just a hop, skip, and a jump away and the Lompoc Café is a fine place to kick back for a post hike beer and banh mi in the shade.

CreditL John Lepak
CreditL John Lepak

Current Conditions

Have you hiked the Precipice Trail recently? Post your experience and the trail conditions (with the date of your hike) in the comments for others!


How to Restock Your First Aid Kit

Venturing out into the backcountry, in any form, is a serious undertaking. Whether you’re ski touring deep in the mountains in the middle of January or doing laps at your local crag on the hottest day in July, our collective pursuit of happiness in the outdoors carries with it some inherent risk—and locales remote enough to require a degree of self-reliance should things go sideways. This is why a first aid kit is absolutely essential on a wilderness sojourn of any scale. Should you really need it—and that occasion may never come—it’ll be the ounce-for-ounce most valuable thing you packed in that day.

A likely—and far less grave—scenario is that your first aid kit is used in increments, for small concerns. A bandage here for a nagging blister, an ibuprofen there for a morning after too many camp beers—that kind of thing. Not a big deal, but over the course of a season or two, you may find that these benign applications have slowly eroded the contents of your first aid kit since you first purchased, adding up to a severely depleted stock.

Fortunately, reupping a first aid kit is a simple task that’ll have you thinking about what you’re carrying while affording you the option to customize your kit based on the activity you’re after, and spring training season is the perfect time to give your kit a look-over and make sure its ready for a summer of adventuring.

The severely depleted contents of an AMK Ultralight/Watertight .5 Medical Kit after a few seasons of light use. | Credit: John Lepak
The severely depleted contents of an AMK Ultralight/Watertight .5 Medical Kit after a few seasons of light use. | Credit: John Lepak

Where to Begin

Odds are your starting point for a first aid kit is of one of the pre-packaged variety. These come in all shapes and sizes and are designed for myriad uses. Adventure Medical Kits makes it easy on us though by specifying how many days and how many people each of their kits can service. Products like the .7 Ultralight/Watertight Medical Kit, for example, are designed specifically for up to two users on trips up to four days while heavier duty options, like the Mountain Explorer First Aid Kit, are stocked for four people for up to a week.

Generally speaking, the lightest of these kits include:

  • Bandage materials, such as gauze, sterile dressings, adhesive bandages, and medical tape;
  • Antibacterial wipes, ointments and other topical applications to clean and treat wounds;
  • Medication, including ibuprofen, aspirin, and antihistamines;
  • Moleskin for blister care, and;
  • Tweezers, which are wicked handy for splinters and ticks.

Your first step is to take an inventory. What do you have? Next, take a look at what the kit’s manufacturer lists on their site for the kit’s contents, note what’s missing, and make a list. If you’re empty in any specific area it may be worth doubling up on those items for the future.

Buying larger quantities cuts down on nasty excess packaging. | Credit: John Lepak
Buying larger quantities cuts down on nasty excess packaging. | Credit: John Lepak

The Resupply

Actually restocking these items is as simple as raiding the medicine cabinet or popping by the drug store, but there are some things to consider while you do so. Medical products are very heavily packaged, for good reason—maintaining sterile dressings and uncontaminated medication is incredibly important. It does, however, result in a substantial amount of single-use plastics, foils, and other non-recyclable materials that amount to tons and tons of waste. Buying items in larger quantities and divvying them up between reusable containers reduces the impact significantly. It also ensures the home medicine cabinet will survive the resupplying of your backcountry first aid kit. Larger bottles of commonly-used medication—like pain relievers or antihistamines—are the way to go. As for bandages, products that have a variety of types, all in the same box, are a good bet.

Consider supplementing your kit based on where you’re planning to go and what you’re planning to do. | Credit: John Lepak
Consider supplementing your kit based on where you’re planning to go and what you’re planning to do. | Credit: John Lepak

Addition by Addition

Following a manufacturer’s template is a great starting point but how we get outdoors isn’t one-size-fits all. Personal experience, knowledge of the terrain, and the nuances of the activity will also dictate just what you need when you go out. Here are some additional things to consider adding to your kit while you’re at it.

Splint

It’ll add a bit of bulk and a minor amount of weight to your pack, but consider adding a splint like the AMK C-Splint to your kit. A broken bone is a serious issue if you’re really out in the backcountry, and immobilizing any such injury shouldn’t need to be a MacGuyver-esque exercise in bushcraft—besides, would you rather be limping down the trail with a well-dressed splint or a twig affixed to your leg with a length of prusik cord and some climbers’ tape?

Emergency Blanket

A severe enough injury may pin your party down in a single location for awhile so ensuring the patient is warm is critical, especially in winter, when hypothermia is a real concern. An emergency blanket like the Karrimor Survival Blanket is a handy addition to any first aid kit. They’re lightweight and useful beyond an injury situation.

Snake Bite Kit

It’s not so much an issue up north, but venomous snakes are a real thing while hiking and climbing in southern New England and New York. There is a reasonably healthy timber rattlesnake population in both the Catskills and the Taconics and Copperheads are extremely common on the traprock ridges of Connecticut. Though sightings still are rare—and incidents even rarer—all it takes is bumping into one on the trail before you’re carrying a kit like this when venturing into these areas.

Packing smart ensures that you can get to what you need quickly. | Credit: John Lepak
Packing smart ensures that you can get to what you need quickly. | Credit: John Lepak

Put it Together

Stuffing everything back into your first aid kit can be a pain, especially with the super-compact prepackaged ones that are designed to prioritize efficiency of weight and space. Try to keep the different items separated from one another—group bandaged with an elastic band or sort pills with reusable plastic baggies. Keep in mind how quickly you may need to access something and organize accordingly.

A first aid kit should go into your pack as a single unit, stowed away somewhere that’s easy to get to. It doesn’t need to be at the top—you shouldn’t be digging past it to get to your water or an extra layer or anything—but it should be accessible. Keeping it in the same place every time you go out is a good practice too, so that you’re always going to know where it is.


Start Planning Your Summer Trips Now: 10 Tips

If you’re contemplating a big adventure this summer, now is the time to start planning. Mark it on your calendar, request work off, and find the team you need to tackle it. Here are 10 things you can do to ensure your trip will be a success.

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1. Find Some Partners

Unless you’re going solo, having the right partners is a critical part of any trip. Late winter is the perfect time to start chatting with friends about summer objectives and building a consensus about what to do, whether you like to climb, backpack, or paddle.

2. Pick a Destination

If you’re anything like us, there are probably so many places on your “must visit” list that it can feel overwhelming to pick one. The process gets even more complex when group dynamics are involved. Start having these discussions now to help narrow the options. As you pare down the list, consider which trips have nearby alternatives in case your desired route isn’t “in condition,” the weather doesn’t cooperate, or it proves too challenging, especially when you start planning it this far out.

3. Research

Pick up the guidebook and search the internet for first-hand accounts to get a more complete picture of what to expect. Learning as much as possible about a trip early in the process is important and will influence everything from your training to your planning to your gear choices.

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4. Pick a Date

Summer schedules fill up fast. Get your group’s trip on the books so that you’re not left sitting at home wondering what might have been. An added bonus—booking flights, reserving hotel rooms, and renting cars are all way less expensive when done far in advance.

5. Reserve a Site/Permit

Whether you’re hiking, climbing, or paddling, many areas require advanced reservations, many of them in the most popular areas require you put in a request or enter a raffle months early. Since the best zones can get filled up quickly, making all campsite reservations and/or obtaining any required permits now is essential.

6. Start Training

There’s nothing worse than showing up for the trip of your life out of shape. While you still have months to train, develop a plan that will put your fitness on the path to success. Not sure where to start? Between them, Uphill Athlete and the Mountain Tactical Institute have training plans for just about every type of outdoor activity.

7. Don’t Forget About Developing Group Skills, Too

Focusing on individual fitness is important, but don’t forget to practice group-specific skills as well. For example, if you’re going to Mount Rainier, make sure your entire group devotes time to developing critical mountaineering skills like crevasse rescue, avalanche rescue, and self arrest.

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8. Do Some Training Climbs

Logging time in terrain is just as important as general fitness training. So if you’re planning a trip to climb something like the Grand Teton, consider tackling some local alpine climbs such as the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle or, as an easier option, Henderson Ridge, both in Huntington Ravine. If you’re planning a mountaineering trip to the Cascade’s volcanoes, think about doing the Lion Head Winter Route while it’s still in condition. Similarly, if you’re going to mountain bike the Monarch Crest Trail, you’ll want to start logging miles ASAP.

9. Buy Trip-Specific Gear

Waiting until a couple of weeks before a trip to purchase trip-specific gear is a recipe for disaster. In such a compressed time period, it might be hard to find what you’re looking for, especially if it’s a niche piece of gear not stocked at your local shop. More importantly, you won’t have much time to learn the ins and outs of that new piece of gear or to break in that new pair of boots.

10. Get Psyched 

It’s easier to train when there’s a goal, it’s easier to justify buying a shiny new piece of gear when it’s for a reason, and work is more bearable when an epic trip is around the corner. Get stoked to get ready for the best trip ever!

Have another trip planning tip that travelers should be doing now? Tell us in the comments!


Tradition or Truth in New Hampshire’s White Mountains

The goal of climbing New Hampshire’s 48 mountains over 4,000 feet in elevation and joining the Four Thousand Footer Club has a 60+ year history dating back to 1957. However, over the past few years, the United States Geographical Survey (USGS) has been re-examining the topography of the White Mountains using Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR), and has made a shocking discovery: at least one of the 48–Mount Tecumseh, the shortest of the 48 4,000-footers—is actually 8 feet shorter than previously thought, putting this now-3,995 foot peak in jeopardy of being excluded from the AMC’s list of recognized 4,000-footers. And while 8 feet is small potatoes in most contexts, for the list-conscious hikers among us, it’s a huge deal.

But, the potential “losers” list may be broader than just Tecumseh. To date, the USGS hasn’t yet made all of the survey data collected public and the AMC has only evaluated the new information pertaining to 26 of the 48 4,000-footers. Still, with more accurate mapping technology available and more survey data to be reviewed, it’s safe to assume that low-lying 4,000-footers besides Mount Tecumseh could be in jeopardy of losing their status as 4,000-footers. Mount Isolation (4,004 feet) and Mount Waumbek (4,006 feet) are two candidates that come to mind. “The NH45” doesn’t have the same ring.

Of course, during the new survey, some mountains could find themselves picking up elevation. For example, at 3,993 feet, Sandwich Dome is just 7 feet shy of the magical mark under the old standards—is it possible it’s “grown”?

Likewise, some peaks could see their prominence (to qualify as a 4,000-footer, a peak must have a minimum rise of 200 feet from all surrounding peaks) increase, thus making them new additions for the 4,000-footer list. Indeed, according to the new data, Guyot now has sufficient prominence on the side facing South Twin. However, the data from Guyot’s other side has either yet to be released or analyzed. But if substantiated, it would mean that a full Pemi-Loop would net a peak-bagger 13—not 12—4,000-footers in one trip.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

How Will This Affect List-Conscious Hikers?

Revising the list of 4,000-footers in New Hampshire is certain to send shockwaves through the peak-bagging community. For many pursuing the NH48, this will surely alter their plans—possibly adding new peaks to their lists while subtracting others. For those with more committed projects—like gridding—changes to the list could significantly complicate their quests. Meanwhile, for those competing for a fastest known time (FKT) for completing New Hampshire’s 48 4,000-footers, subtracting Tecumseh could save a speed-hiker a couple of hours (including drive time, of course).

The flux in elevations of the New Hampshire 48 thus begs the question: How, if at all, will the AMC adjust the list? Will it just change the list to reflect the mountains’ true elevations? Or will it continue to include some of these now-“lesser” peaks on the list even though they no longer technically qualify? Believe it or not, this isn’t the first time the list keepers in the Northeast have faced the question.

History of AMC Changes

In the past, the AMC has adjusted the list according to a peak’s true elevation. In fact, the story of the New Hampshire 4,000-footers begins with just 46 peaks, ironically mirroring what was thought to be the number of Adirondack peaks over 4,000 feet in elevation. It wasn’t until the USGS published a new South Twin Mountain quadrangle that the New Hampshire 4,000-footers became 48 with the addition of Galehead Mountain in 1975, followed by Bondcliff in 1980. The most recent change came in 1998, when new survey data lead to Wildcat D replacing Wildcat E on the list of 4,000-footers.

Despite these changes, the AMC has not, to our knowledge anyway, ever just subtracted a 4,000-footer from the list. Indeed, even when they swapped the Wildcats, they made clear that ascents under the old standard would still “count.”

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

An Adirondack Tradition

With a tradition dating further back than New Hampshire’s (Robert Marshall, George Marshall, and Herbert Clark first completed the Adirondack 46 in 1925) more than 10,000 hikers have followed in their footsteps since, according to the ADK46ers—the ADK46 list is more steeped in tradition than true elevation, as more recent USGS surveys have shown 4 peaks to fall short of 4,000 feet, while one peak found to meet the essential elevation has been omitted (MacNaughton Mountain). Despite the updated information, the ADK46ers continue using the same list of 46 peaks that was used back in 1925. And, as two Tecumseh traditionalists—to be clear, we’ve hiked the mountain a lot—this could be a great solution in New Hampshire as well.

 

Given all this, what do you think the AMC should do? Would you be excited to see a new list and a new challenge? Or, would you prefer the AMC keep the tradition of the 48 alive? We want to hear! Let us know your thoughts in the comments below.


Video: How to Adjust Your Petzl Helmet

If it doesn’t fit right, are you even wearing it?


How to Choose Hiking Footwear

Your footwear might be the single most crucial piece of gear that comes with you on a hike. The interface between you and the trail, your sneakers, boots, sandals, or other shoes (alongside your socks) protect you from whatever’s on the ground, keep you comfortable as you move across it, help support your load, make it easier to move across the terrain, and more. So, naturally, there are tons of footwear options out there for hikers. Finding the right one for you is a little bit like dating: Choosing the right features, components, and fit is a time-consuming and research-intensive process. But if you do a lot of hiking, having your dream shoes will keep you moving farther, faster, more comfortably, and safer. So where should you begin?

READ MORE: How to Choose Socks

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What to Look For in Hiking Footwear

The “boot wall” at your local EMS can be an intimidating thing—shoes of all different shapes and sizes, colors and materials, weird “GTX” letters in the name, and more. Knowing your way around some of these different features and characteristics will help you narrow down your options and pick the right boot for what you want to do.

Height

Each type of hiking footwear hits at a slightly different place on your ankle, and even a few inches can make a big difference in your comfort and ease of movement, but the best height for you depends heavily on the terrain you plan on hiking, how much weight you plan to carry, and your personal preference.

High-cut boots extend well above your ankles and do a good job of supporting them, preventing injury. Especially if you’re carrying a heavy load (like when you’re backpacking), or on a rougher trail, they help avoid rolling ankles, and other strains to those joints. They also help stop dirt from getting into your shoes.

Low-cut shoes—which don’t extend very high at all and fit like sneakers—are lightweight and easy to pack. They’re good for well-maintained trails where you won’t be carrying much weight and want to move quickly with as little weight on your shoes as possible.

Mid-cut boots are the best of both worlds: ideal for when you’ll be carrying a some weight in your backpack, and/or when you need a little more ankle support to hike in dubious conditions.

Waterproofing

The difference between waterproof and non-waterproof boots is pretty self-explanatory: Waterproof boots will help keep your feet dry splashing through puddles and mud, or skipping across streams. However, when wearing a waterproof boot, you will sacrifice some breathability, so on a hot dry day, your feel are more likely to feel damp from sweat in a waterproof shoe than they would in a non-waterproof shoe. Also keep in mind that the waterproof membrane in footwear can’t keep you dry if you step in water that “overtops” the boot, and if that happens, a waterproof membrane could make it harder for your shoes to drain that water than they would without a membrane.

GO: Waterproof Shoes | Non-Waterproof Shoes

READ MORE: Maintaining Your Waterproof Shoes and Boots

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Materials

Most hiking shoes and boots are made with a combination of nylon and split-grain leather or suede. These boots are lightweight and consequently less expensive, and they also are easy to break-in. Other hiking boots are made of full-grain leather. These are durable, heavy, and sturdy, but take longer to break-in and will feel a little stiffer on your feet (at least at first).

Outsole and Midsole

The outsole of a shoe or boot is the bottom of the boot—the part that touches the ground. Outsoles have different types of lugs or grooves to help you grip the terrain. A shoe or boot’s midsole is in the middle of the shoe and affects flexibility or stiffness and cushion. Most lightweight hiking shoes have a soft sole that lets your foot wrap around uneven terrain on easy, short hikes, but soft-sole boots won’t be comfortable if you’re carrying a lot of weight. Hard-sole backpacking and mountaineering boots are the way to go for any trip that’s more intense. Because the soles are stiff and strong, these boots can handle extreme terrain and help you carry lots of weight — but as a trade-off, the lack of flexibility might hurt your feet.

Also pay attention to the material that makes up the outsole. Firmer, more durable rubbers will last longer in all sorts of terrain, but softer, stickier rubber will grip rock and other surfaces better, giving you greater traction.

Upper and Lacing

The upper of a hiking shoe or boot is the part that covers your toes, the top of your foot, the sides of your foot, and the back of your heel. As you consider which hiking shoe to purchase, you’ll want to make sure the upper is very durable and is also breathable—check to see whether it’s made of a lightweight (but still sturdy) material that will let air circulate around your foot. The upper of a hiking boot is also the part with the laces. Look for locking eyelets and sturdy laces to get a precise fit, especially on taller, stiffer boots.

Crampon-compatibility

Most mountaineering boots are crampon compatible. If you’ll be hiking and climbing in snow or ice, you may want to purchase a pair of crampons to attach to your boots. Crampons with a semi-rigid construction and horizontal frames are the best choice to attach to leather hiking boots. For simply walking in the snow, lightweight crampons will work fine. More strenuous activities such as waterfall ice climbing call for steel crampons that can handle tough terrain.

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Types of Hiking Footwear

There are a handful of broad categories for hiking footwear, all of which feature a specific combination of the features above which make them well-suited for a specific activity. Keep in mind: None of these options are only good for a single activity. While some may be better-suited for a specific type of hiking, you’re not locked-in.

Trail Running Shoes

Trail running shoes are actually a type of running shoe—they look more like sneakers than hiking boots—but they work just as well for short hikes, too. They typically have a very grippy outsole and are a durable shoe, making them ideal for any type of hike, even terrain that’s more technical. Trail running shoes are reinforced for extra protection, especially around the toe area. And like many types of shoe, you can choose a pair that has extra cushioning or one that’s more minimalist. Compared to other boot types, these are super light, making them as popular for short hikes as they are with long-distance hikers.

Light Hiking Shoes

Low-cut, lightweight hiking shoes are excellent for novice hikers not carrying a lot of weight or for anyone who’s planning a short day hike on flat terrain. Most hiking shoes are lightweight and flexible. However, they’re more durable and sturdy than trail running shoes. Some are waterproof with an extra lining while others focus on breathability, circulating air around your foot through a mesh upper. Hiking shoes are generally fairly painless to break in.

Day Hiking Boots

Hiking boots are different from hiking shoes in two big ways: They hit higher on the ankle and they have a stiffer construction, offering more protection. Hiking boots are more protective and supportive, but they’re also heavier than hiking shoes. Wear them when you’re heading out on a hike with lots of weight on your back. Hiking shoes are durable, but not quite as sturdy as backpacking boots.

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Backpacking Boots

Backpacking boots have a high ankle cut and are durable, stiff, and supportive, which makes they great for the hikes when you have a long way to go and a lot to carry. Good for just about any kind of terrain and any kind of weather, backpacking boots have aggressive outsoles (sometimes with a place for snowshoes or crampons to attach) and need to be purchased well before your hiking trip so you can break them in.

Mountaineering Boots

Planning to hit the outdoors and do some ice climbing or snowshoeing? Mountaineering boots are the best choice for you. Tall, stiff, and insulated, mountaineering boots are designed for extreme conditions and extreme activities in ice and snow. Most mountaineering boots are meant to be used with crampons.

Performance Sandals

Performance sandals are made for rafting and other summertime adventures. Their textured no-slip sole grips the ground, allowing you to take short hikes with no problem. Make sure you find a pair of sandals that has good toe protection and that are easily drainable.

Approach Shoes

Approach shoes are almost like a cross between hiking boots, climbing shoes, and trail running shoes. Their sticky rubber sole means they’re best used for anything “approaching” rock climbing destinations, so if you anticipate doing some bouldering or rappelling on your hike, wear some approach shoes to help you tackle the terrain leading up to the bouldering problems. Approach shoes are comfortable and okay for long distances, but not good for rough terrain or when carrying lots of weight.

GO: Trail Running Shoes | Light Hiking Boots | Backpacking Boots | Mountaineering Boots | Multi-Sport Sandals

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Trying Hiking Footwear On

It can be hard to truly get a feel for a pair of shoes if you’re trying them on in-store, but there are still some things you can do to see how they’ll perform on the trails.

First, come prepared. When you go shopping, wear or bring the socks you’re planning to hike in, and also bring along any insole or footbed inserts you might use. Second, walk or even jog around the store. Walk up and down a set of stairs or a ramp if you can. Finally, make sure the shoes have enough space for your toes, that they provide good arch support, and that your heel doesn’t lift or move (if it does, you’ll get painful blisters). Try different lacing techniques to dial in the perfect fit for your foot shape.

After purchasing the shoes, wear them around your house or try taking them on a short, easy test hike so you can be absolutely sure they’ll work for what you need.

Be prepared to break in your new shoes or boots — this is another good reason to take a test hike before the big day. Listen to your feet and put in the time: A quick fix—such as soaking your boots—probably won’t be a lasting one.


52 (More) goEast New Year's Resolutions

As we approach the New Year, it’s natural to look back and reflect on the 12 months that just passed. And, while it’s fun to think about our favorite summits, trips, and trails from that period, it’s equally exciting to look ahead and plan what’s next. With that in mind, we’ve gathered some more of our favorite articles from the past year to put together the ultimate outdoor-focused list of New Year’s resolutions. Make these ideas part of your bucket list for 2019.

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Winter

  1. A few of the Unbeatable Speed Records in the Northeast were broken last year. Start training now to find out how fast you can go.
  2. Go winter camping in comfort.
  3. Hike the Adirondacks’ MacIntyre Range and summit three of the High Peaks.
  4. Visit one of these unique ice climbing crags.
  5. Start working on New Hampshire’s other list, the 52 With a View. They’re awesome in the winter, and you won’t encounter the masses found on some of the Whites’ most popular 4,000-footers.
  6. Hike the Lion Head, one of Mount Washington’s iconic winter routes.
  7. Pray for weekend pow, and ski the Whiteface Auto Road.
  8. Ice climb Shoestring Gully.
  9. Learn the dos and don’ts of climbing in the gym.
  10. Celebrate Presidents’ Day by getting presidential in the White Mountains.
  11. Take your skis or snowboard on a trip.
  12. Lighten up the dark days of winter by brightening up your wardrobe.
  13. You’re not going to send your project by sitting on the couch—start training at home and crush it at the crag this year.

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Spring

  1. Don’t stop skiing just yet.
  2. Give your gear room a spring cleaning.
  3. Hike Mount Monadnock, the world’s second-most popular mountain.
  4. Ski Tuckerman Ravine, the epicenter of backcountry skiing in the Northeast.
  5. Break out your mountain bike early.
  6. No need to wait for Rocktober—send something this spring.
  7. Tackle one of Connecticut’s top-notch trails.
  8. Leave the tent behind and camp in a hammock.
  9. Find out if your pup is man’s best friend or man’s best hiking partner.
  10. Vow to keep your mountain bike clean through mud season.
  11. Get outside: Take your climbing from the gym to the crag.
  12. See how it feels to use trekking poles on your next hike.
  13. Take your road bike for a century ride—that’s one hundred(!) miles.

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Summer

  1. Summit the Catskills’ two 4,000 footers—even better, do it in a day.
  2. Hike Mount Washington, the tallest peak in the Northeast.
  3. Paddle the Adirondacks’ Seven Carries Route.
  4. Be a better (nicer) hiker.
  5. Hike the Thunderbolt Trail to the top of the tallest peak in Massachusetts.
  6. Go alpine climbing on the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle.
  7. Kick back with a cold one, and enjoy one of these top brews.
  8. Tick five High Peaks off your list by traversing the Dix Range.
  9. Take the kids for a hike in the ‘Daks this summer.
  10. Prove that big views don’t require big elevations.
  11. Avoid these backpacking no-nos on your next multi-day trip. (Did somebody say Pemi Loop?)
  12. Stretch out your paddling season.
  13. New York City might be so nice they named it twice, but every now and then, you need to escape the Empire City.

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Fall

  1. See great foliage without ever leaving Boston.
  2. Layer up for cool fall temps and go climb High E in the Gunks.
  3. Take a backpacking trip to New Hampshire’s Carter Range.
  4. Get out of Gotham, and get to these fantastic fall hikes.
  5. Peep leaves at these Adirondack hotspots.
  6. Ditch the single-pitch crowds at Rumney, and explore the area’s multi-pitch moderates.
  7. Make stretching after a run your new mantra.
  8. Stop avoiding these New Hampshire 4,000-footers.
  9. Hike Vermont’s tallest peak, Mount Mansfield.
  10. Celebrate the season—vest weather is the best weather!
  11. Do it the old-fashioned way by ditching the digital camera and try taking photos with film.
  12. Take your running off road.
  13. Donate on Giving Tuesday to one of these great Northeast organizations.

Of course, these are just a few outdoor-oriented New Year’s resolutions. We want to hear about what’s in store for 2019, so leave your plans in the comments!


Video: Attach a Fin to an SUP

It’s paddle season! And if you’ve been thinking about picking up a new Stand-Up Paddleboard, now might be the time to do it. But before you dive into the local pond with your new toy, make sure you put it together fully. Having the fin on right can go a long way toward the board’s speed and control on the water. Here’s how to put it on.