Gear Nerd: How Does MIPS Save Your Noggin?

You’re cruising along sweet deep powder carving down the slope with the wind whipping on by and a giant grin on your face. And then suddenly…the slope isn’t where it should be and you’re about to experience what it’s like to be a snowball. Lovely.

Fortunately for you, you’re smart and you’re wearing a helmet. Because you’re wicked smart you picked a helmet with MIPS. Maybe this won’t hurt so bad?

As you’re lying in a snowbank catching your breath and checking to make sure everything still feels intact, you might be wondering just exactly how your helmet and the MIPS technology works.

Courtesy: MIPS

What is MIPS?

Identifying a MIPS helmet (whether it’s a ski helmet, a bike helmet, or something else) is pretty easy. From the outside, it looks pretty standard, but flipping it over puts the business end in full view.

All helmets have at least 2 layers: the hard outer shell and a thick inner foam layer. If something falls straight onto the top of your head, or you make a perfectly head-on (pun intended) impact with a tree, these two layers crush and absorb a lot that impact before it can get to your skull and brain.

But that’s not how most accidents work. More likely, you fall off your bike and your helmet hits the pavement at an angle, or you side swipe a branch after losing control on your skis. It’s those indirect impacts where the MIPS layer really comes in.

Taking a look at the inside of your helmet and you’ll find a thin piece of yellow plastic inside the foam layer. The pads sit on this one so it’s what comes in contact with your head. But it also moves in relation to the rest of the helmet thanks to some elastic. The result is a helmet that can “slip” back and forth, or side to side, when it’s on your head.

But how does that help you in a crash?

With a non-MIPS helmet, your brain and skull would have played a wild game of ping pong: As the helmet hit the ground, it would force your entire head to rotate violently, sloshing your brain inside your skull. But the MIPS layer let the helmet slip without your head, redirecting the energy by allowing the low friction layer to move 10 to 15 millimeters. When your helmet hits the snow, the outer two layers slide along the MIPS layer and your head, absorbing more impact and redirecting it away from your brain.

So where can I find it?

MIPS helmets are becoming more and more popular every year, making their way into ski, bike, climbing helmets and more. Look for the little yellow circular “MIPS” logo to know that the helmet features the technology.


10 Tips to Get Ready for a Big Bike Ride

While the experiences of cruising the Kancamagus Highway on your road bike and getting down and dirty covering all 35 miles of machine-made singletrack at Green Woodlands on your mountain bike are vastly different, preparing for long rides is remarkably similar. Whether you’re going the distance on a road bike or planning to go big on a mountain bike, here are some secrets for a successful big bike ride.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

1. Log Miles 

The success and enjoyment of your ride depends on what is done in the weeks and months leading up to it. Everyone has different training needs, but in general, the more time you put in the saddle, the better the big day is going to feel. Don’t wait until the last minute to train; Ideally, the week prior to the ride is reserved for gentle sessions that leave you feeling fresh and ready for your big ride.

2. Reconnoiter the Ride

Before hitting the road or trail, it’s important to know what you’re getting yourself into. Studying the route to get a clear understanding of the terrain (hilly, rolling, flat), infrastructure (are there places to get food or refill water?), and key intersections (trail or road) is a good way to ease stress and set yourself up for success. Nothing beats tires on the ground—try riding a smaller section (or sections) of your planned ride to get a feel for what you’re up against. Riding a few sections in advance also reduces the likelihood of you getting lost on your big ride, which is likely to be very important as fatigue sets in.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

3. Small-Sized Segments 

Whether tackling massive mileage, vast vertical, or just pushing a personal best, a big bike ride can seem daunting. A smart strategy is to break the ride into smaller, more easily-accomplished segments. Plan ahead and have rewards waiting—riding the first 50 miles of a century is less unnerving when there’s a piece of pizza (or two) waiting.

4. Get in Tune with Your Bike 

An underperforming, malfunctioning, or broken-down bike will suck the enjoyment from your ride and may even end it early. Before heading out, make sure your bike is in top mechanical condition. Here are a few things to confirm before the big day:

  • All bolts are tight
  • Brake pads aren’t worn
  • Shifting is smooth—there is no skipping
  • Wheels are true and there no loose spokes
  • Tires have tread and aren’t damaged—for example, there are no glass shards in tread or excessive wear in the sidewalls
  • Tire pressure is set correctly

And if you ride a mountain bike, you’ll also want to make sure:

  • Your suspension is set up correctly
  • The dropper post (if you have one) is functioning properly
  • There is sealant in tubeless tires (if you have them)

If you don’t feel confident tuning your bike, bring it to a professional. Just make sure to leave them plenty of time to go through it.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

5. What Can Go Wrong, Will Go Wrong 

No matter how well you train or prepare, something inevitably will go wrong. Luckily, unforeseen events don’t have to mean an end to your ride. Pack a small repair kit and practice making common fixes such as changing a flat tire. A good basic repair kit includes:

  • A multitool
  • Two tubes
  • Tire levers
  • Tire repair tool and plugs
  • A pump or CO2 inflator and cartridges
  • Chain breaker and master link
  • A spare derailleur hanger (for mountain bikes)
  • A couple of zip ties
  • Duct tape

6. Other Essential Items 

In addition to mechanical problems, it’s important to prepare for other eventualities. A fully charged cell phone can help you summon a ride in the event of a blowout (either your bike or you), and a $20 bill or a credit/debit card is a blessing if you need to procure a much-needed snack. Lastly, carrying an ID or wearing an identification band is essential in the event of an accident.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

7. Correct Clothes

Like any outdoor activity, you’ll want to have the proper layers on hand for your long ride. While the exact layers will depend on when and where you’re riding—and the amount of space you have available to carry them—one item stands apart from the rest: padded bike shorts. Padded bike shorts cushion your sit bones and protect your most delicate parts, ultimately making cycling more enjoyable. The longer your ride, the more valuable a good pair of bike shorts becomes.

8. Food and Drink

A long ride is no time to count calories or worry about your diet. A good rule of thumb is to eat before you’re hungry and drink before you’re thirsty. A big ride is also no time to mess around with new foods. Use your training miles to figure out what works for you—some riders prefer gels and bars while others prefer real food like wraps or PB&J sandwiches cut into small squares.

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9. Move Around 

Even the most seasoned cyclists cramp up and get stiff when stuck in one position for too long. During your ride, move your hands around the bars, shift back and forth on the saddle, and stand up from time to time to keep from placing too much strain on one body part.

10. Power of Positive Thinking 

The fact is most long bike rides fall into the second category of fun—that is, the experience is blissful in hindsight, but feels a lot like suffering in the moment. It’s okay to feel tired and it’s normal to get sore, but don’t let those physical ailments turn into negative thoughts. Think in positives—for example, at the 50-mile mark of a century, you don’t have half the ride left to finish, rather, you’ve already completed half the ride.

The old saying, “If you fail to plan, you are planning to fail” often holds true. Since a big bike ride is challenging enough, don’t make it harder by failing to show up properly prepared. If you have any more tips for riders looking to tackle a big ride this year or any favorite long rides that others should check out, let us know in the comments!


Are the Green Woodlands New England’s New Mountain Bike Hot Spot?

More and more mountain bike trails are springing up around New England every season. In most cases, these trail systems start with a few miles and grow slowly over the years; Rarely does a full-blown trail system spring up overnight. One place breaking the mold and blowing up the mileage is Green Woodlands in Dorchester, New Hampshire, which has opened up 70 miles of mountain bike trails—35 miles of which are machine built—in just a few years.

Green Woodlands’ mountain bike trails come thanks to the Green Woodlands Foundation, a private (multi-generational family) operating foundation that has 23,000 acres of land in the New Hampshire towns of Lyme, Dorchester, Orford, and Wentworth. The foundation’s focus is wildlife management, environmental research and education, historical preservation, and activities that get people outside, such as cross-country skiing and mountain biking.

The area has one of the easiest trail systems to navigate in the Northeast. In addition to having printed maps and brochures in most parking lots and maps at prominent trail junctions, there’s also a digital map on the Trailforks app and a free, downloadable geo-referenced PDF that is compatible with apps like Avenza. Be sure to arrive prepared—Green Woodlands’s goal was to create a backcountry “wilderness” mountain bike experience, which is what you get (to say cell-phone service is spotty is an understatement). There’s also no end-of-day trail sweep, so ride with a buddy.

The only charge for riding Green Woodlands is a smile, which isn’t hard to produce after a day riding their trails. It’s worth noting that the new nature of the trails and the fact that they’re machine built makes them particularly sensitive—avoid riding them in the rain and when they’re muddy to ensure they remain rideable and open. If the weather is questionable, check their Facebook page for conditions and updates. The mountain bike season at Green Woodlands runs from June 1st to November 5th.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Smooth and Clean 

What differentiates the Green Woodlands trails from the rake-and-ride trails that dominate other New England destinations is that they are primarily machine built. This means that the trails are smoother with fewer rocks, roots, and natural obstacles in them. It also makes these trails accessible to a wider range of riders—beginners will love the relative lack of obstacles and that the most challenging sections almost always have b-line or are easily rolled. Alternatively, more seasoned riders will find plenty of berms on trails such as Cellar Hole, tables on trails like Moose Tracks, and side hits including those on Brook Trail to play on.

While the trails themselves are very beginner-friendly, most will want to make sure they’re feeling pretty fit when visiting Green Woodlands, as there’s a significant lack of flat and rolling terrain; long climbs are rewarded with long descents and vice versa. However, thanks to an abundance of parking lots on North Dorchester Road, shuttling is a straightforward (and popular) activity, provided you have two cars.

Upper Norris. | Credit: TIm Peck
Upper Norris. | Credit: TIm Peck

The Must-Rides 

All the trails at Green Woodlands are worth exploring, but the Norris Trail should be on every Northeast mountain biker’s must-ride list. Accessed by a long, gradual climb up the Quimby Bike Trail—or a more direct grind up the double track of the Six Mile Trail—the Norris Trail is worth the effort. Delivering three-ish miles of pure downhill bliss, the Norris Trails descends approximately 1,000 feet, making it one of the longest continuous descents you’ll find in New England.

It’s not merely the length of the Norris Trail that makes it a must ride, it’s the quality. The trail begins with a sneaky (and uncharacteristic for Green Woodlands) steep, rocky chute before giving way to smooth, swoopy machine-built berms, boostable tables, and the odd side hit that will quickly have you forgetting about the searing in your lungs and wondering if it’s normal to smile so big.

Brook-trail

Beyond the Favorites 

Ledges was the first mountain bike-specific trail built at Green Woodlands—before biking, the area was known for its extensive network of XC ski trails. Different in character from many of the network’s other trails, Ledges starts with a climb up smooth singletrack which leads to some uncharacteristically techy granite ledges (hence the name) and eventually leading to a swoopy, machine-made descent.

Riders looking for a tamer trail will want to seek out the Brook Trail. Ebbing and flowing between short climbs and gradual descents, the wide, smooth singletrack culminates in a series of grin-inducing berms. Notable for the numerous giant stone cairns guarding the sides of the trail, the Brook Trail is great for beginners looking to gain confidence as well as seasoned riders wanting a fun, fast, trail that requires some pedaling.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

The Fine Print

At the moment, Green Woodlands is only open to residents of New Hampshire and Vermont, but the trails were built to draw visitors to this off-the-beaten-path part of the state. While you wait for Green Woodlands to expand their opening, spend some time riding hills to ensure maximum mileage when you visit and follow their Facebook account for updates.

Have you visited Green Woodlands? If so, let us know if you have any tips for first-time riders in the comments below. And, if you just visited Green Woodlands for the first time, let us know what you think!


Video: How to Make a Sick Edit

“Give your rider an on-air high five and tell him ‘that was so sick bro.'”


Stop Doing These 10 Things While Mountain Biking

With everything from gyms to movie theatres closed in the wake of COVID-19, many people have turned to the outdoors for both fitness and entertainment. The renewed interest in the outdoors has led to a renaissance in numerous sports, one of which is mountain biking. Whether you’re new to the sport or just getting back into it after a long hiatus, make it look like you’ve been riding all along by avoiding these ten mountain biking mistakes.

1. Skipping Maintenance 

Neglecting your bike is no joke. Avoid going from shredder to schmuck by cleaning your bike when it’s dirty (here’s how), lubing your chain regularly, and checking the air pressure in your tires before every ride. If you’re riding tubeless tires, refresh the sealant every few months. For bikes with suspension, wipe down stanchions and check the pressure of the shocks frequently.

2. Not Knowing How to Make Easy Fixes 

Walking your bike out of the woods because you don’t know how (or weren’t prepared) to make an easy fix is no laughing matter. Know how to make simple repairs, such as fixing a flat, and carry the tools needed to make them: a multi-tool with a chain breaker, a master link, a few zip ties, a pump (or CO2 inflator and cartridges), and a spare tube (or tubeless repair kit). Another trick is to practice making repairs in a consequence-free environment so that you’ll know what to do if mishap strikes on the trail.

Credit: TIm Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

3. Not Wearing a Helmet

Always hit the trail wearing a helmet, as even the most experienced riders have unexpectedly crashed their bikes. Helmets protect your most valuable asset—your brain—and have gotten progressively more comfortable and lightweight over the years. Think they look dorky? Better to look like a numbskull than have a cracked skull.

4. Leaving Trash Behind

These days, it seems like every trail junction has a small collection of water bottle caps, energy gel tops, and bar wrappers—not to mention valve covers and cam nuts. Pick up your trash and take it with you. Better yet, clean up rogue litter and leave the trail in better condition than you found it.

5. Riding Muddy Trails 

Riding your favorite trail while it’s wet and muddy is one of the most foolish things you can do. It leaves ruts, creates erosion, and widens the trail. The damage you’re doing makes mountain bikers look bad to landowners and managers, and threatens the future access.

6. Strava-ing 

In the hands of the right person, Strava is a wonderful tool for tracking rides, logging miles, and gauging improvement. In the wrong hands, it turns even the best-intentioned bikers into monsters. KOMs and QOMs are nice achievements, and medaling on a segment boosts confidence, but if you really want to race…enter a real one.

Credit: TIm Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

7. Acting Like a Jerk

There’s nothing funny about a lack of trail etiquette. If you’re a slower rider, move over and let faster riders pass you. If you’re a faster rider, give slower riders a chance to let you pass and resist tailgating. If you need to make a repair, stay clear of the trail when doing it. In general, act friendly to other riders and trail users—ride in control, smile, and say hello.

8. Being Elitist 

27.5-inch or 29-inch tire? Aluminum or carbon? Fully rigid or full-suspension? Flat pedals or clipless? The fact is that the trails are filled with many different types of bikes and riders. So long as everyone is acting appropriately and having a good time, the sport is healthy. Thinking you’re better than everybody else on the trail ensures you’re the butt of the joke.

9. Making Excuses

It’s too hot. It’s too cold. The trail is too far away. Stop making excuses and start riding your bike! The trick to an awesome riding season is to get out in all conditions, on all types of trails, with lots of different riders, and to simply spend as much time on your bike as you can. Here are some great rides around Boston’s south shore and a favorite spot to stop for a ride and a pint (or two) in New Hampshire’s Lakes Region to get you going.

10. Thinking About Mountain Biking (Instead of Actually Riding)

The world is filled with distractions: Danny MacAskill videos on YouTube, your riding buddy’s latest GoPro shreddit, magazines like Bike and Freehub, glossy manufacturer catalogs, and Pinkbike to name a few. While those are all great for getting psyched, they also dupe you into wasting time that would be better spent actually riding your bike.

Do you have a tip for new riders or see something you’d love more experienced riders to stop doing? If so, we want to hear it! Leave it in the comments below.

Credit: TIm Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

FAQ: How You Can Enjoy the Trails While Social Distancing

We get it. Shelter in place orders, quarantines, and social distancing are complicated. Different municipalities and states have slightly different rules, so it can be hard to know what you can and can’t do. And especially for those of us who like to get outdoors, the instinct to “get away” and head off the grid might be at odds with some of the directions we’re hearing these days. The simple answer—just stay home—frankly may be the best thing we can do to slow the spread of this virus, and the easiest way to ensure we’re not doing anything that could cause problems for ourselves and other people. But at the same time, we need fresh air to maintain our own health and sanity. So how do you balance those two competing needs?

Step one: Know the rules in your local area. Read and understand the recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, then study up on any regulations and guidelines that have been put in place by your state, county, or municipality, as well as any closures of local parks, trailheads, and facilities. Whether you’re under a full shelter in place order or not, it’s good practice for us all to be following the same general guidelines to help slow down this virus. These answers have been written to apply to the vast majority of people—most orders allow for some level of physical exercise—but be sure you understand what your local recommendations and requirements are.

20190726_EMS_Conway-4425_Backpack_Hike_Scene

If I was told to shelter in place, can I still go for a hike/bike ride/climb?

Yes! Getting exercise is not only important for your sanity, but it’s also a vital part of keeping your immune system up and running. But while at this time of year we might normally be thinking about driving to the next state over to climb a 4000-footer or dusting off our climbing shoes, we need to scale back quite a bit during this crisis. For starters, staying close to home to avoid being a part of the virus’s spread, keeping 6 feet of distance between yourself and any other people, and staying home entirely if you’re sick at all, are critical. And as you would anywhere else, practice good hygiene by washing your hands and using hand sanitizer, coughing into your elbow, and drinking enough fluids to keep your immune system healthy.

How far away from home can I go for a hike?

The simple answer is that this might be a great time to get reacquainted with your local neighborhood park and staying on the trails nearest to home. If you need to do much driving to get there, consider finding someplace closer. Stopping for gas (inevitable at some point, even if it’s not on this particular trip), or to get snacks, or use the bathroom increases your interaction with public spaces and the chance that you could pick up or spread the disease. While most parks and public lands are still open, check before you head out, just to be sure.

20190726_EMS_Conway-7197_Kayak_Scene

Should someone from an at-risk group do things differently than someone who is less at-risk?

Let’s get one thing straight: Everyone is at risk. While younger, active people have definitely been impacted less by the virus, they have been shown to be the biggest transmitters of it. Without any symptoms, it’s easy to assume you’re safe and continue on your day-to-day, but if you are carrying the virus, you could be spreading it without even knowing.

That being said, older people and those with underlying health conditions should be extra precautious to avoid picking up the virus themselves, and should consider staying even closer to home.

What if I’m not going to a populated area, and just headed to a quiet little mountain town instead?

Bad idea. While heading up to isolated North Conway, Keene Valley, or Millinocket might seem like a good way to escape the virus, each visitor to those towns increases the risk that the virus will appear there. And more than most places, the virus is something that those towns simply can not handle, thanks to smaller hospitals, fewer medical professionals, and less equipment. Steer clear of these places to avoid putting the local residents at risk. Once again, it’s best to stick close to home.

20190724_EMS_Conway-0168-2_Hike_FW_Merrell_Compass4PointShort_Socks

Can I go with friends or should I go solo? What about my dog?

Avoid large groups and keep a healthy distance from everyone—6 feet is recommended. If you want to get out with a buddy rather than going solo, that will always increase your safety on the trail, but consider doing some things a little differently. Maybe now isn’t the best time to be meeting new hiking buddies on Facebook or elsewhere. Stick to friends who you know and trust to vouch for their health and sanitation. Also consider driving separately to trailheads. It’s difficult to maintain 6 feet of separation with a buddy if you’re in the same car. Sharing a tent with a friend might also be out, for now.

Experts don’t believe your pup can get this particular strain of coronavirus, so get them some fresh air, too! Just be wary of strangers petting your dog and potentially transmitting the virus to its fur, before snuggling up with the pup at home at night.

Am I allowed to get sendy?

With emergency workers and medical professionals a little preoccupied by the virus, now might not be the best time to go particularly hard and put yourself at risk of injury. Dial it back, make conservative decisions, and stay safe to avoid needing to take a doctor away from someone who is really sick. Carry a first aid kit, stick to trails you know, and don’t do anything particularly risky or challenging, right now. On a similar note, while getting exercise can boots your immune system, overexercising and pushing yourself physically can take a toll.

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What if I see other people on the trail?

Again: 6 feet of distance. Say “hi” and be your friendly self, but give others as wide a berth as possible. If that not possible, either because of the trail or the number of people on it, consider choosing a different place to go that day. Think about your objective when you pull into the trailhead. If it’s too crowded, you could be putting yourself or the others on the trail at-risk.

Is it safe to go skiing even if all the resorts are shut down?

Earning your turns can be one of the best ways to milk every last day out of your ski season if the resorts are shut down, and skinning at the resort is one of the best ways to be introduced to ski touring generally. But keep in mind: Uphilling during the open season includes the promise of groomed trails, marked obstacles, ski patrol assistance, and avalanche mitigation. With the resorts closed, it might as well be a day in the backcountry. Be prepared for that. If you don’t have ski touring experience, consider going with a friend who does (staying 6 feet away from them, of course), carrying all the gear you would have for a day in the backcountry, and having avalanche safety knowledge. And again—Keep it mellow.

Have another questions? Leave it in the comments!


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Bet you didn’t think to ride here.


Tired of the Winter? These 7 Southeast Adventures Will Warm You Up

If you’ve had enough cold and snow for the season, why not plan a late-winter/early-spring vacation in the Southeast? In just a few hours you can fly into Atlanta, Georgia, or Jacksonville, and feel the sun on your face! Whether you’re a hiker, paddler, cyclist, or camper, you’ll want to check out these seven Southeast activities that are sure to warm your spirit for adventure during the Northeast’s coldest part of the year. 

Joe King gets his feet wet on the Florida National Scenic Trail. This 30-mile section of Big Cyprus is located at the southern terminus, and borders the Everglades. | Courtesy: Aaron Landon
Joe King gets his feet wet on the Florida National Scenic Trail. This 30-mile section of Big Cyprus is located at the southern terminus, and borders the Everglades. | Courtesy: Aaron Landon

Get Your Feet Wet at Big Cypress National Preserve

Big Cypress, bordering Everglades National Park, is the southern terminus of the Florida National Scenic Trail and offers a very challenging 3-day, 30 mile hike through an otherworldly wet cypress forest. This is considered the toughest backpacking trip in Florida, but if you can handle being wet most of the time, and don’t get too freaked out by the vast loneliness of hiking through a swamp, you’ll come away from this experience a changed person. If you want to continue north on the Florida Trail, keep going and you’ll reach Billie Swamp Safari within the Seminole Indian Reservation where you can sleep in a real Seminole Chickee hut.

Cumberland Island’s 50 miles of trails meander through pristine maritime forests under live oak canopies. Courtesy: Troy Allen Lair
Cumberland Island’s 50 miles of trails meander through pristine maritime forests under live oak canopies. | Courtesy: Troy Allen Lair

Cumberland Island National Seashore

Cumberland Island is Georgia’s largest and southernmost barrier island, featuring pristine maritime forests, undeveloped beaches, and wide marsh views. There are many miles of rustic hiking trails, backcountry campsites, historic sites, and lots of wildlife, including sea turtles, turkeys, wild hogs and horses, armadillos, and abundant shore birds. To make the most of your time on the island, set up camp at Yankee Paradise, a primitive campsite located in the middle of the island. From there you can explore Cumberland’s breathtaking seashore, Plum Orchard Mansion, Dungeness Ruins, and the Settlement, an area located in the north end of the island that was settled by former slaves in the 1890s. Make your camping and ferry reservations in advance because the number of visitors to the island are limited.

The Dirty Pecan ride and Thomasville Clay Classic are two gravel rides featuring stunning scenery beneath live oak canopies. | Courtesy: Phillip Bowen
The Dirty Pecan ride and Thomasville Clay Classic are two gravel rides featuring stunning scenery beneath live oak canopies. | Courtesy: Phillip Bowen

Cycle Through the South

The 40th Annual Florida Bicycle Safari will be held April 18-23 this year, and includes six days of riding in North Florida and South Georgia. “The Florida Bicycle Safari is much more than just a ride,” says Louis McDonald, Safari Director. “We’ve planned six days of cycling, food, games, live entertainment, and plenty of Southern hospitality at Live Oak and Cherry Lake. Our riders are from all over the country. Different routes are offered each day, including two century rides. Being the 40th anniversary, this year’s event is going to be our biggest yet!” 

And if gravel riding is your thing, the Dirty Pecan ride will be held on March 7 in Monticello, Florida, followed by the Thomasville Clay Classic on April 13 in Thomasville, Georgia. “I really love being off paved roads where there is little to no traffic,” says cyclist Cheryl Richardson, a member of the North Florida Bicycle Club. “Both of these rides feature beautiful tree canopies and spectacular scenery the entire route.”

The Okefenokee Wilderness Area offers over 400,000 acres of wetlands and swamps to explore with seven overnight shelters. | Courtesy: Troy Allen Lair
The Okefenokee Wilderness Area offers over 400,000 acres of wetlands and swamps to explore with seven overnight shelters. | Courtesy: Troy Allen Lair

Paddle the Okefenokee Swamp

A multi-day paddling trip though Georgia’s Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge is a bucket list must do. There are wooden platforms throughout the swamp where you can pitch a tent at the end of each day of paddling. You’ll see lots of alligators, birds, and rare plants—The swamp is a photographer’s dream come true. You can bring your own canoe or kayak, or rent them at the park’s concessioner. They also offer guided paddling trips to suit your needs. Other activities include fishing and hiking. The Okefenokee will leave you spellbound.

The Pinhoti Trail’s Cheaha and Dugger Mountain Wilderness areas offer an otherworldly hiking experience. | Courtesy: Troy Allen Lair
The Pinhoti Trail’s Cheaha and Dugger Mountain Wilderness areas offer an otherworldly hiking experience. | Courtesy: Troy Allen Lair

Hike Alabama’s Pinhoti Trail

Start your 335-mile hike at the southern terminus, Flagg Mountain, and meet famous hiker and author, Nimblewill Nomad, who is now the caretaker there. The Pinhoti traverses through Talladega National Forest, Cheaha Wilderness, and Dugger Mountain Wilderness before entering Georgia, where it eventually meets up with the Benton MacKaye Trail, and onto Springer Mountain. Appalachian Trail hikers consider the Pinhoti a great practice hike before attempting the AT.

Providence Canyon is a hidden gem in the state of Georgia, with just enough elevation changes and glorious scenery to make it fun for all ages.
Providence Canyon is a hidden gem in the state of Georgia, with just enough elevation changes and glorious scenery to make it fun for all ages.

Visit Georgia’s Providence Canyon State Park 

Called Georgia’s Little Grand Canyon, Providence Canyon is a hidden gem. Massive gullies as deep as 150 feet were caused by poor farming practices during the 1800s, yet today they make some of the prettiest photographs within the state. Hikers who explore the deepest canyons will usually find a thin layer of water along the trail, indication of the water table below. The hike is not strenuous but has enough elevation changes to make it fun! Guests who hike to canyons 4 and 5 may want to join the Canyon Climbers Club. Backpackers can stay overnight along the backcountry trail which highlights portions of the canyon and winds through a mixed forest. This is a great trip for families who may prefer to stay in the developed campground and take day hikes. 

South Carolina’s Palmetto Trail includes the mysterious Swamp Fox Passage, where you can expect to do a little wading through Wadboo and Dog Swamps. | Courtesy: Troy Allen Lair
South Carolina’s Palmetto Trail includes the mysterious Swamp Fox Passage, where you can expect to do a little wading through Wadboo and Dog Swamps. | Courtesy: Troy Allen Lair

Hike South Carolina’s Palmetto Trail

South Carolina’s Palmetto Trail is a new trail, and still in progress (350 miles of the trail are completed; the entire trail will be 500 miles long). Swamp Fox Passage is the longest section of the cross-state Palmetto Trail at 47 miles, and traverses four distinct ecosystems through Francis Marion National Forest, including swamps made famous as hideouts of Revolutionary War hero, Francis Marion. This trail is both dry and wet, and hikers will enjoy wading through Wadboo and Dog Swamps, along with Turkey Creek. Swamp Fox Passage is close to Charleston, so be sure to give yourself an extra day or two to explore the city.