Go Big at Boston’s Local Ski Area: Blue Hills

Straddling the Milton-Canton town line, the Blue Hills Ski Area in Greater Boston’s Blue Hills Reservation is one of many local ski hills that are the lifeblood of the ski industry in the Northeast. Sure it’s small—just a handful of trails, one chairlift, a few magic carpets, and a vertical drop of just 309 feet—but between its storied history, geographic proximity to Boston, and skier-friendly hours, this family-focused area has served as a developing ground for skiers and riders across the region.

Credit: Tim Peck

A Ski Hill in Boston’s Backyard

Like so many ski trails in the Northeast, the first runs on Great Blue Hill were cut by the Civilian Conservation Corps in the 1930s. Charlie Proctor—winner of the first US downhill race in 1927 on Mount Moosilauke’s Carriage Road, member of the 1928 Olympic Ski Team, and the first (with John Carleton) to ski the Tuckerman Ravine Headwall in 1931—was among the designers. Alpine in nature, the narrow “Number 1” trail was later widened to become Big Blue, the backbone of the lift-serviced resort developed in 1949 and opened in February 1950 by the Metropolitan District Commission.

Big Blue remains Blue Hills’ preeminent ski trail to this day. It’s the most prominent, too—the large, wide slope is visible for miles around, especially at night when lights illuminate the snow-covered steep for night skiing. But it’s not the only reason to visit Blue Hills. The area has a stellar learning area where generations of skiers have learned to ski, as well as several other trails like Patriots Path, Chute, and Sonya that are great for novices and intermediates alike.

These days, Blue Hills is best known as a family-friendly resort. With learn-to-ski programs for all ages and a deep rental fleet, there are lots of opportunities for first-timers at Blue Hills. The beginner area, with several magic carpets and trails, is located just steps from the area’s rental building, so getting on the slopes for a lesson couldn’t be easier. For parents putting children in lessons, there are ample vantage points both on and off the slopes to observe and take pictures. And when they—like so many other skiers and riders have over the generations—graduate from the beginner area to making runs down Big Blue, it’s easy to watch them carve turns from the front of the lodge.

Credit: Tim Peck

When to Visit

For the most reliable conditions, visit Blue Hills on weekdays before school gets out or just after opening on a weekend morning. Arrive then and you’ll likely find a handful of retirees plus a patroller and/or ski instructor, all with huge grins on their faces from arcing large-radius turns down a freshly groomed Big Blue. For those working a more traditional schedule, the chair spins until 9 pm on weeknights and 8 pm on weekends and holidays. Clear goggles are a huge plus for night skiers.

Larger storms help bolster the snowmaking efforts at Blue Hills. If conditions allow, Sonya is a pleasant run with excellent views of the Boston skyline. Don’t miss Beer’s Bluff either, a  steeper-than-you’d-expect run under the lift that’s named for the ski area’s former operators.

Many high schools and area ski teams call Blue Hills home and Big Blue has been the home of many ski races over the years. Skiers or riders looking to ski chair-to-chair should check the race schedule before visiting.

Credit: Tim Peck

Getting There

Nestled in the Blue Hills Reservation, Blue Hills is located near the junction of Interstates 93 and 95. Just minutes from Boston, the ski area is convenient for those living south and west of the city. Given its location and large surrounding population, it’s no surprise that so many people have learned to ski or ride there.

Post-skiing, the popular après hangout is the nearby Hillside Pub. The food is good, the beer is cold, and you’ll likely find a few ski patrollers and lifties mixed in amongst the crowd. If you’re catching the last chair on a weeknight, call ahead with your order and it’ll be ready when you get there.

If you’re interested in learning to ski or ride or just looking to cold-down with a few post-work groomers, put a visit to Blue Hills on your winter to-do list.

Credit: Tim Peck