6 Long Adirondack Day Hikes for the Solstice

The weeks surrounding the summer solstice, which starts on June 21st, let you take advantage of extended daylight hours to tackle a challenging hike. And, for people looking to get the most out of the longest days of the year, the Adirondacks are chock-full of demanding, full-day treks.

Getting any of these long hikes done in a single day is no small feat, so preparation is key. Train your body to be in good hiking condition, pack a headlamp just in case, and become extra familiar with your route. Also, most of these recommended hikes have a “bail out” option, in case you’re losing light or energy.

The hikes listed below all begin from different trailheads. So, if you’re feeling ambitious and complete a few of these, you’ll be covering new territory with each trek.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

Gray Peak, Mount Skylight, and Mount Marcy

Distance: 17 miles
Elevation Gain: 5,200 feet
Trail Head: Adirondack Loj / Heart Lake
Route Type: Loop (recommended counterclockwise).

Aim for good weather during this hike. On a clear day, you’ll have plenty of opportunities for expansive views on Marcy’s and Skylight’s mighty bald summits. And, despite Gray having a wooded peak, a few lookouts offer good views of both Skylight and Marcy. To prepare, be sure to bring an extra pair of socks, because you’ll cross the infamous floating boards relatively early on. These are nearly impossible to walk over without soaking a boot.

From the Adirondack Loj, head south past Lake Arnold to Feldspar Brook, and then, climb to the three peaks. Perhaps the loop’s best part is the pleasure of hiking Marcy, New York’s highest point, via the southwestern approach. This breathtaking route is almost entirely above the treeline and is much less crowded than the northern approach on which you’ll descend. Other notable sights include the picturesque Lake Tear of the Clouds, which is the state’s highest pond and the Hudson River’s source.

As you return, follow the Van Hoevenberg Trail back to your car from Marcy and past Indian Falls, where the late-afternoon sunlight looks marvelous bouncing off the flowing water.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

Mount Haystack, Basin Mountain, and Saddleback Mountain

Distance: 17.5 miles
Elevation Gain: 5,600 feet
Trail Head: Garden Parking Lot (Marcy Field when lot is full, serviced by shuttle)
Route Type: Loop (recommended counterclockwise).

Also known as the Upper Great Range and often shortened to “HaBaSa,” this hike bags three High Peaks, which of course means lots of climbing.

First, climb through the Johns Brook Valley to Haystack. As the trek’s most memorable part, the outstanding views of the surrounding mountains rival the notorious cliffs leading up to Saddleback. As you head north from Haystack, you’ll pass over Basin before summiting Saddleback via the cliffs. These have a reputation for being the High Peaks’ most difficult terrain, although much of it is a mental test. Hikers generally prefer ascending to descending them. After Saddleback, follow Ore Bed Brook back down to Johns Brook via a seemingly endless sets of stairs, which follow a striking slide formed by Hurricane Irene.

A perk of this hike is the availability of water via a spigot at Johns Brook Lodge, which is located 3.5 miles from the parking lot and gets passed both on your way in and out. It’s also a great place to rest your feet, relax on the deck, and make a few new friends.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

Sawteeth Mountain, Gothics Mountain, Armstrong Mountain, Upper Wolfjaw Mountain, and Lower Wolfjaw Mountain

Distance: 17 miles
Elevation Gain: 6,500 feet
Trailhead: Adirondack Mountain Club at Ausable Club
Route Type: Loop (recommended clockwise).

You’ll definitely be earning your summit time with some serious climbing. But, if you end up feeling like you’ve taken on too much, a few trails along the way lead down from the range. Hike up the Lake Road and climb the Weld Trail to Sawteeth, the peak farthest out, to assess the day’s itinerary, as it affords an excellent view of the range you’ll be climbing. Beginning with the most remote peak also provides the mental boost of knowing you’re working your way back towards the trailhead for the rest of the day. Then, continue north to the remaining mountains before doubling back briefly on Lower Wolfjaw and descending along Wedge Brook to Lake Road.

As a tip, try to pick a day with clear skies, as you’ll be treated to panoramic views of adjacent peaks and spectacular slides. Be sure to carry enough water, too. Once you’re on the range, you’ll find few places to refill, and the continuous climbing and exposure can easily dehydrate you.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

Macomb Mountain, South Dix, East Dix, Hough, and Dix Mountain

Distance: 16 miles
Elevation Gain: 5,700 feet
Trailhead: Elk Lake
Route: Loop (recommended counterclockwise).

The Dix Range is another loop that will bag you five High Peaks and set your quads on fire. Most of the trails are unmarked, so be sure to bring a map that shows all of the herd paths and to reference it at all intersections you encounter. Also, be sure to get to the trailhead early. If the parking lot is full, you’ll have to park back near Clear Pond, which will add 3.5 miles round-trip to an already-strenuous hike.

From Elk Lake, head north to climb the Macomb slide. Unlike most of the other Adirondack slides, which are hard rock slab, Macomb is loose rock and gravel. So, keep a safe distance between people in your group, and look up for falling debris. From there, keep climbing north, ticking off individual peaks in whichever order makes sense to you.

You’ll end the day on the range’s highest peak, Dix, which offers sweeping views of the rest of the range, other High Peaks to the north and west, and the serene Elk Lake. To return, descend over The Beckhorn back to the Elk Lake Trail.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

Cliff Mountain and Mount Redfield 

Distance: 18.5 miles
Elevation Gain: 4,400 feet
Trailhead: Upper Works Trailhead
Route: Out and back.

Cliff and Redfield are relatively remote High Peaks. Thus, the hike is essentially a long walk to get to the base of the two mountains. If you’re an aspiring 46er, it’s strongly recommended to hike these peaks together.

From Upper Works, you’ll hike past the beautiful Flowed Lands and cross the Opalescent River via a suspension bridge—both peaceful places to rest or have a snack. The trails for each mountain begin close to the Uphill Lean-To. By foot, these are just a few seconds from one another, so hike them in whichever order you like. Redfield has a marked trail, which is longer and gains more elevation than Cliff. Living up to its name, Cliff has a few areas of rock scrambling, although nothing too technical, and can be quite fun after the uncomplicated walk-in.

On the hike out, pause at the Flowed Lands to refuel and rehydrate for the last leg, which can feel monotonous when you do it a second time after the long way up.

Credit: Ryan Wichelns
Credit: Ryan Wichelns

Santanoni Peak, Couchsachraga Peak, and Panther Peak 

Distance: 15.5 miles
Elevation Gain: 5,000 feet
Trailhead: Tahawus/Upper Works Road
Route: Part out-and-back, and part loop.

Although not quite as long in distance as the other hikes, the Santanoni Range takes some time due to unmarked and unmaintained trails, which can be rugged and rocky. This hike is a good alternative if the weather is going to be gloomy, because, although the various lookouts offer great views, all three summits are mostly wooded. But, as a perk of being in the woods for most of the day, your exposure will be limited.

Couchsachraga (or “Couchie”) is usually climbed only on the pursuit to become a 46er. So you’re aware, you’ll encounter a sizable bog on the way to the summit. And, due to the peak being initially surveyed incorrectly at over 4,000 feet, anyone wanting to become a 46er must hike through it.

Overall, the range is fairly remote, and with less-crowded trails than those in the more popular High Peak areas, it makes a good option for those busy holiday weekends. And, since the first 1.75 miles is an easy trek on a dirt and gravel road, starting or finishing in the dark isn’t a major concern.