Video: Powering a Home with BioLite

Traveling to the US for a race was a lot harder before her family could charge their phones.


Video: Trail Running in Chamonix

“Chamonix is the epicenter of some of the most extreme outdoor sports in the world, and with that comes…a lot of dudes.”


Video: Discomfort in Antarctica

“I think I’m still figuring out where my line of comfort and discomfort is with climbing.”


Video: Making Music in Indian Creek

Nothing beats the quiet sounds of the desert.


Video: Rope-Soloing El Cap in 24 Hours

Rope-soloing is one of the most misunderstood climbing disciplines out there, but it might also be one of the most exhausting. Doing 3000 feet of it in 24 hours on one of the world’s more famous big walls? That’s an accomplishment worthy of a video.


Video: 10 Steps to Build Your Adventure Van

Only 10 steps? Sounds easy! Ok, so maybe it’s a little bit harder than that makes it sound but with enough planning and preparation, your dream van build can be broken down into just a couple easy parts. Keep it simple, stupid!


5 Tips for Traveling Stress-Free With Your Outdoor Gear

When traveling abroad in search of adventure, packing duffel bags of gear to put on a plane can be one of the most stressful parts. Between over-packing, losing bags, breaking gear, or just not getting to your destination with everything you thought you needed, a lot can happen between point A and point B. But, there are ways to eliminate many of these issues. So, follow these tips to keep things as simple and stress free as possible.

Courtesy: Holidayextras
Courtesy: Holidayextras

Watch for Extra Fees

You have to consider a few factors when you’re flying with a lot of gear. First, make sure you are thorough in the flight planning process, so nothing gets damaged and you don’t end up needing to pay more than you had anticipated.

Specifically, pay close attention to baggage policies. Is a checked bag included in the price of your super-cheap ticket to Iceland, or is the add-on charge going to run you another $100? Many airlines also don’t include carry-on bags. If you plan on needing one, check the airline’s policy before you book.

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Protect the Pointy Objects

Climbing gear can be notoriously heavy and sharp—two characteristics that aren’t the best for airline travel. But, with a little thought and planning, traveling with climbing gear can be a breeze.

Pack ice axes, crampons, ice-screws, and any other sharp gear in your checked bag, because you won’t be able to carry it on the plane. Keep these items in stuff sacks or separate compartments away from clothing, climbing ropes, tents, and other soft materials to avoid any unwanted tears or core shots.

Check the Scale

Nobody likes showing up to the airport with an overweight bag. The fees are a pain, and re-sorting your gear in front of the check-in scale is an embarrassing waste of time when you’re in a rush.

For starters, make sure your luggage stands up to the size requirements for both checked and carry-on baggage. Don’t be the person trying to shove a full-size backpack into the overhead compartment.

At home, be sure you know the weight limit for your checked and carry-on baggage. Then, pick up a cheap baggage scale, or throw your bags onto the bathroom scale. As a tried-and-true technique, weight yourself first, and then, weight yourself again while holding your bags and wearing your backpack. Simply subtract your body weight to determine the weight of your baggage. Overall, it’s a bit easier than trying to balance anything on a small bathroom scale.

Still overweight? When packing heavy gear, ask yourself, “Do I really need this?” Ahead of time, plan out climbing gear with your partners, so you don’t bring more than necessary. Sharing a trad rack and distributing the group gear to even out the load can save a lot of weight.

As another option to offset the weight of a checked bag, put small but heavy items like cams and carabiners into a carry-on bag. And, if you are on a winter trip with lots of outerwear, try wearing some of your bulkier, heavy clothing in the airport to save space.

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Follow the Rules

The TSA discourages camp fuel, and in taking it along, you could lose your stove for good. So, empty and thoroughly clean out your fuel bottles before flying. Giving your stove a cleaning isn’t a bad idea, either.

Make sure to pack your pocket knife or multi-tool in your checked baggage, as knives are not allowed in carry-on luggage. When packing your camp lighters, however, put them in your carry-on. Interestingly enough, they are prohibited in checked baggage, unless they are in a DOT-approved container. Additionally, leave any aerosols at home, including bug spray in a can and bear spray. These cannot be brought along in your baggage.

When you’re traveling internationally, you’ll find that some countries take serious measures to keep out invasive plant species, as they can negatively affect the local ecosystems. New Zealand, for example, screens incoming travelers’ luggage as they go through the customs process. If travelers failed to clean their gear, customs confiscates it upon your arrival at the airport.

To avoid losing all of your camping gear, clean everything thoroughly before packing it:

  • Remove the dried soil from your boots.
  • Hose-off all parts of your tent, including the stakes, which often hold a lot of soil.
  • Check your pole baskets for any caked-on dirt.
  • Then, let everything dry completely before you pack it up.
Courtesy: Doug Letterman
Courtesy: Doug Letterman

Keep It Safe

It’s not uncommon to sweat bullets as you wait for your bags to come off the carousel. But, broken or missing gear is only one expensive problem. It’s a far bigger issue to get to a distant location just in time for a trip, only to realize you’re missing the essentials.

So, label all of your gear in a unique way, in a place where it can be read and where it won’t be rubbed or broken off. As a tip, use something like Eagle Creek’s Reflective Luggage ID Set. Paper gear tags, however, are not strong enough. Don’t be afraid to use a permanent marker to put your contact information directly onto your bags.

If you paid for a budget flight, especially an international one, several airlines won’t insure your bags. As a note, most non-budget American airlines usually include it. Gear is expensive, so it might be worth picking up temporary travel insurance, if you don’t have it already.

In travel, hold onto your luggage tags and receipts. Have proof that you handed over your bags to an airline, especially when traveling with expensive items.

It’s also not a bad idea, depending on where you’re traveling, to use a TSA-safe luggage lock. Don’t use a regular lock, however. It’s almost guaranteed to be cut off during an inspection. TSA locks, instead, can be opened by officials and then placed back on once you leave the airport.


Video: El Cap Speed Record Time Lapse

It feels like there’s a new speed record on The Nose every year, but this video makes the latest one feel different. When Brad Gobright and Jim Reynolds made the send in October 2017, they had one team time-lapsing the whole 2-hour, 19-minute, 44-second endeavor (!!). This unique climbing video will make you want to practice your jumaring.


Video: Traveling the Greater Patagonian Trail

For four months, a team of travellers in their early twenties set out to hike along the unrelenting Greater Patagonian Trail. Engaging with locals along the way, the volunteers are reminded of the stark discrepancy between their ways of life, and are made aware of the looming developmental projects that threaten the previously untouched and untainted areas across Patagonia. In a moving display of companionship, ‘Unbounded’ illustrates that the future of the country rests on the preservation and protection of its breath-taking natural spaces. Watch the full film here.


Ditch the Cold: 8 Wintertime Rock Climbing Escapes in North America

The bliss of cool Sendtember and Rocktober days has finally given way to downright cold, snow-, and ice-covered rock and perpetually numb fingertips. To us climbers, that usually means we either give in to the sterile siren song of the climbing gym, turn in our rock shoes for ski boots, or go full masochist and pick up ice tools to tide us over until our screaming barfies resign and our frozen fingers thaw. But, fear not. While your Rumney project is snowed-in, other climbing areas are coming into their prime, if you can escape the Northeast to check them out. So, take a winter vacation, dig your rock shoes back out, and sample some of the best winter climbing destinations in North America.

Credit: Ted Schiele
Credit: Ted Schiele

The American Southwest & Mexico

The American Southwest is undoubtedly the best place to go. Plentiful sun and mild temperatures will melt away your icy Northeastern core. Whether you’re a new boulderer just getting your feet wet or a hardened tradster who isn’t ready to sacrifice your fingers and toes to the ice climbing gods, the Southwest is open to a lifetime of trips.

Credit: Ted Schiele
Credit: Ted Schiele

Joshua Tree National Park, CA

The former stomping grounds of climbing legends like John Bachar and John Long, Joshua Tree’s rock formations beg to be climbed. The park is home to roughly 5,000 routes, so its variety really shines. Bring your crack skills and your rack, because you’re inside a wonderland of rocks. World-class bouldering also intermingles with trad climbing here, for those who want to stay closer to the ground.

Lodging can be had in the town of Joshua Tree, but if you really want to immerse yourself in the rock, get a spot at either Ryan or Hidden Valley Campground and walk to these world-class climbs. On rest days, go exploring the labyrinths of rock, or check out the multitude of day hikes and short loops. Don’t miss the Cholla Cactus Garden at sundown or the views of the Colorado and Mojave Deserts from atop Ryan Mountain.

Classics:

  • Double Cross (5.7+, trad)
  • Sail Away (5.8, trad)
  • White Rastafarian (V2 R)
Credit: Hayden Bove
Credit: Hayden Bove

Red Rock Canyon, NV

Its placement right outside Las Vegas makes Red Rocks a perfect winter getaway. The beautiful sandstone peaks provide ample opportunities for every sort of climber. If you’re a boulderer, check out the Kraft Boulders for concentrated bouldering, or venture deep into the canyons for a solitary experience. Sport routes are ample throughout the area, especially in Calico Basin and The Black Corridor, where great lines are just an arm’s length apart.

For the adventure climber, Red Rocks is a no-brainer, as it offers routes over 1,000 feet tall for full-day outings on bomber, well-protected rock. Stay at the nearby campground, snag a local Airbnb, or go all-out and hit the Strip to try to make back that money you spent on new cams. Rain is infrequent in this area, especially compared to the East, but if there is precipitation, be sure not to climb until the rock has fully dried to preserve the routes.

Classics:

  • Solar Slab (9 pitches, 5.6, trad)
  • Epinephrine (13 pitches, 5.9, trad)
  • Levitation 29 (9 pitches, 5.11b, mixed)
Credit: Ted Schiele
Credit: Ted Schiele

Bishop, CA

A favorite among climbers, this unassuming town on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada is California’s most concentrated climbing hotspot, packed with sport destinations, world-famous bouldering areas, and alpine granite masterpieces.

The steep-walled Owens River Gorge cuts through hundreds of feet of volcanic tuft. As such, the sport climbs here are long and pumpy, favoring endurance over all else. Despite sharing the same rock as the gorge, the boulders on the Volcanic Tablelands offer more gymnastic movement, involving pockets and overhanging features. It stays much warmer here than any other climbing area in Bishop, so it’s a great option when the temperature drops.

Credit: Ted Schiele
Credit: Ted Schiele

The real crown jewel, though, is the Buttermilks. These granite monoliths sit below the imposing Mount Tom on the edge of the Owens River Valley. They have a reputation as only a location for highball bouldering, but that isn’t true. Rather, there are classic climbs for people of all comfort levels.

The town is full of climbers, van-dwellers, and vacationers alike. Check into one of the hotels in town or make use of the Pleasant Valley Campground at only $2 a night. Being only 45 minutes from Mammoth means that you could be bouldering at the Buttermilks in the morning, and make it to Mammoth Mountain for some fresh Sierra powder by lunch.

Classics:

  • Heavenly Path (V1)
  • Jedi Mind Tricks (V4)
  • High Plains Drifter (V7)
Courtesy: Visit El Paso
Courtesy: Visit El Paso

Hueco Tanks, TX

The birthplace of American bouldering is a winter destination that still holds up to this day. Much has changed since the legendary John Sherman devised his V-grade scale here. Currently, two of the three areas, East and West Mountains, are closed to the public without a paid guide, due to a high concentration of sensitive pictographs. North Mountain is open without a guide, but climbers must make reservations in advance. Despite the red tape, it remains an awesome spot to spend a trip and provides a more private and pure experience than what you would find at places like Red Rocks.

Classics:

  • Ghetto Simulator (V2)
  • Moonshine Roof (V4)
  • Baby Face (V7)
Courtesy: Scarpa
Courtesy: Scarpa

El Potrero Chico, Mexico

Ever dream about doing Yosemite-esque, big-wall climbing with nothing but a stash of quickdraws? Dream no more, because, just south of the border, the small town of Hidalgo is a limestone paradise and more. Fly to Monterrey, Mexico, and catch a taxi, or punch it south from Laredo, Texas, for three hours to arrive in Hidalgo. Nearly everything is a sport line that is well-bolted and without crazy runouts, including 20-pitch big-wall routes.

If 2,000-foot epics aren’t in your wheelhouse, more reasonable multi-pitch outings and single-pitch cragging can be had all within a short walk or drive from town. Stay at one of the numerous campgrounds and climbers’ hangouts here, all with views of cliffs like Rancho el Sendero and Homero.

Classics:

  • Will the Wolf Survive? (4 pitches, 5.10a, sport)
  • Space Boyz (11 pitches, 5.10d, sport)
  • Gringo Disco (1 pitch, 5.11b, sport)

 

The Southeast

Long known for its outstanding climbing, Southeast sandstone is some of the finest anywhere. It’s perhaps best known as a fall destination because of places like Red River Gorge in Kentucky and New River Gorge in West Virginia, but drive a little further south towards Chattanooga and get ready to slap some Southern slopers through until spring. All of these destinations are close to each other, so hitting them all in one short trip is possible. Word to the wise: This is still the East we’re talking about, so it rains and will likely be chilly. Need a place to stay on your Southern journey, and you’re not into stealth camping? Hit up the Crash Pad in Chattanooga for a place to…crash, as well as pick up some beta on all the locations. It’s also a nice central location for all the bouldering in the area.

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Stone Fort (LRC), TN

Stone Fort (aka Little Rock City) has something for everyone: great, inspiring lines at all grades, slopers, crimps, highballs, and lowballs. The boulders are on a golf course, so park at the climbers’ specific lot and sign in at the clubhouse.

Classics:

  • Storming The Castle (V1+)
  • Mystery Machine (V3)
  • The Wave (V6)

Ricktown, GA

Rocktown, GA

More secluded than either Stone Fort or HP40, Rocktown is a newer area with fresh problems still being put up. The rock is similar to elsewhere in the Chattanooga area, with huecos, crimps, and a plethora of slopers leading to even more slopers and then to the top-outs. Free camping is possible in the lot for those looking for a longer-term visit or wanting to keep costs down.

Classics:

  • Ripple (V2)
  • Croc Block (V5)
  • Golden Shower (V5)

Horse Pens 40, AL

A remarkably dense boulder field that can be traversed in 10 minutes means there’s less approaching and more sending. Get your top-out pants on, because these routes are challenging and slopey. And, stock up on skincare materials—it’s like climbing on sandpaper here. HP40 is on private land in the foothills of the Southern Appalachians, so be sure to respect the owners. If you aren’t making use of the camping on site, pay your bouldering fee to ensure that we can continue to climb here. It’s less than two hours from Chattanooga, so it’s a good option to stay here for a few days at a time before returning to the other boulder fields nearer to the city.

Classics:

  • Bum Boy (V3)
  • Groove Rider (V5)
  • Popeye (V5)