Rumney's Multi-Pitch Moderate Rock Climbs

Rumney has a well-deserved reputation as the best sport crag in the Northeast, thanks to its high-quality, single-pitch, bolted climbs at almost every grade. But, did you know that Rumney is also home to a handful of fun, moderate, multi-pitch sport climbs? Here’s a best-of list for almost every grade, along with tips for honing your multi-pitch skills.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Jimmy Cliff: Clip a Dee Doo Dah, 5.3

Don’t discount this remarkable route because of its modest grade. Clip a Dee Doo Dah delivers two pitches of fun slab climbing on surprisingly sticky stone leading to a cliff top with a breathtaking view of the Baker River. This route is so good, you’ll want to bring your approach shoes, so you can make quick time on the trail back to the base of the route and do it again!

Clip a Dee Doo Dah is well protected and a fantastic climb for newer leaders. With a two-bolt anchor and decent ledge atop the first pitch, it is also a great place for any climber to practice multi-pitch rope management. In particular, carefully consider where you build your master point and put your belay. Putting it too low may lead to exhausted elbows and a messy rope stack as you try to keep up with your partner charging up the route.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Jimmy Cliff: Lady and the Tramp, 5.4

Immediately to the climber’s right of Clip a Dee Doo Dah is Lady and the Tramp. It features the same stellar rock found on its popular neighbor, but it’s a little bit steeper and has a few bulges, with the most notable one being directly above the belay at the top of pitch one. It, too, is an excellent route for leaders new to multi-pitch climbing.

In terms of skill building, the route presents a great opportunity for recognizing the dangers of falling directly onto the belay. Particularly, watch out for the crux on the second pitch, located just above the first anchor and initially unprotected. Although a fall is unlikely, the consequences are significant. As such, get in the habit of clipping one of the anchor bolts before leaving the belay.

Speaking of belays, Clip a Dee Doo Dah and Lady and the Tramp share an anchor atop the second pitch. So, in case it’s occupied, bring a cordelette, so you can build your anchor on one of the many nearby trees. Bonus points for safely extending the anchor, so you can watch your second climb!

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Model Citizen, 5.6

Model Citizen is a great introduction to Rumney’s more vertical multi-pitch climbing. Featuring huge holds and interesting movement, the first pitch leads to a two-bolt anchor on a modestly sized belay ledge. More of the same type of climbing follows on pitch two. In fact, if you have a 70-meter rope, the two pitches can be combined into one monster-long pitch, albeit with the leader only being lowered to the anchor on the top of the first pitch.

A key for this route—and the others that follow—is that the top of the final pitch is not intended to be a belay station. Rather, the leader should build an anchor, clip the rope into it just like on a regular single-pitch sport climb, and then get lowered back to the first-pitch anchor. The second can then clean the route and anchor, before being lowered back to the first-pitch anchor. From there, the parties can do a single-rope rappel to the ground. Have questions about the best way to rappel? Check out tip 2 and the associated video in this goEast article.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Crowd Pleaser, 5.7

Another fantastic multi-pitch route, Crowd Pleaser begins a few feet to the right of Model Citizen in a left-facing corner. After an awkward first move or two, the route continues on good holds to an initial two-bolt anchor, for those wanting to top-rope the first pitch. Assuming you’re doing both, keep climbing just a little bit higher to the top of the first pitch. Here, there’s another two-bolt anchor with a nice ledge to belay from. The second pitch begins as low-angled slab before turning into fun, exposed climbing on the arete.

Pigtails, otherwise known as ramsheads, have been a popular option for equipping lower-offs in Europe for years. Inexpensive, robust, and easy to use, they are becoming a more common sight at Rumney, thanks to a grant from the American Alpine Club and the Access Fund. And, unlike other top anchors, they are certified and tested for use as a lower-off—a pigtail is rated to 18kN. Plus, they have no moving parts to wear out or rust.

Want to learn more about using the pigtails found at Rumney? Check out this fantastic video the Rumney Climbers Association published.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Tipping Point, 5.8

The hardest move on the first pitch of this juggy gem of a route might be the first one. So, consider having your belayer spot you until you make your first clip, or you could face a long tumble down the hill. Tipping Point’s first pitch is filled with dreamy climbing, once you unlock the hidden holds, and it ends at a huge belay ledge. Build an anchor, bring up your second, and then continue up. The crux comes at the top of the second pitch, where the slab turns vertical. Although it can feel challenging compared to the rest of the route, the holds are all there, the climbing is fun, and the position is fantastic.

The anchor on the first pitch is the perfect place to practice using the quad anchor. The quad is our go-to anchor on two-bolt anchors, and if you’re unfamiliar with it, check out this excellent video from the AMGA showing you how to use it.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Charity Toad, 5.9

If you’re looking to beat the crowds on Model Citizen, Crowd Pleaser, and Tipping Point, check out Charity Toad. This three-pitch climb is the hardest of the Main Cliff Right’s multi-pitch routes, connecting Charity Case with the final pitch of White Toad via a short traversing pitch. White Toad’s final pitch is airy and very exposed—and definitely worth checking out.

Since you can access several climbs from the top of the first pitch, and the route’s second-pitch traverse crosses at least one more, Charity Toad’s first-pitch belay anchor is a great place to sharpen your route-finding skills. In addition to reading the guidebook, consider taking a screenshot of the route description and map with your smartphone. That way, you’ll have all the beta with you while you’re climbing the route. Of course, if you want to minimize any potential route-finding confusion, just climb the first two pitches of White Toad instead. But, since White Toad’s first pitch only goes on gear, you’ll have to bring your trad rack.

Have you climbed any of aforementioned routes? Tell us which one is your favorite in the comments.


Newsflash: American Alpine Club purchases climbers camp at Rumney

The American Alpine Club is bringing its collection of climbers’ campgrounds and huts, which includes a campground in the ‘Gunks, to the best sport crag in the East. The organization announced, today, that is has purchased Rattlesnake Campground adjacent to the Rumney Rocks Climbing Area in New Hampshire.

Previously owned and operated by a local couple, the 15-acre property sits between the Baker River and Buffalo Road, directly across the street from the Meadows and Parking Lot Walls on the crag’s east side.

“Rumney is one of the country’s finest sport-climbing destinations,” said AAC CEO Phil Powers. “With visitation on the rise, and with more than 22 million Americans and Canadians within weekend striking distance, the American Alpine Club is proud to participate in a sustainable long-term camping solution for this popular spot.”

Rumney Rattlesnake

Courtesy: American Alpine Club
Courtesy: American Alpine Club

Rumney Rattlesnake will continue to act primarily as a first-come first-serve campground with a large communal area, fire pits, and picnic tables. In addition, the AAC plans to set aside a small number of online-reservable, private campsites in the near future. Porta potties and access to potable water will continue to be available at the property’s barn, but the AAC also plans to open the barn in the future as a community space and weather shelter for climbers with full bathrooms and showers.

AAC members will see a discounted $8 per night rate starting immediately and non-members will be charged $12 per night. Dogs are also now allowed on the property.

“With the Rumney Campground now part of the AAC’s growing lodging network, we are looking forward to welcoming climbers from around the Northeast and the world to experience this wonderful place, learn, challenge themselves, and meet old and new friends,” said Powers.


The New Hampshire Climber's Guide to Pizza

Whether I spend the day testing my mettle at Cathedral, getting in laps on Cannon, clipping bolts at Rumney, or wrestling pebbles at Pawtuckaway, I know I’m not making it all the way home without stopping to eat. But, what to eat? That’s usually an easy answer: pizza. 

In my humble opinion, it’s the perfect post-climbing food. It’s delicious, its various toppings can accommodate most palates, and it is relatively inexpensive. Those of us who climb in New Hampshire are lucky to have some fantastic pizza options in close proximity to most of our major crags. My girlfriend recently coined the term “sending slices,” because sometimes that warm slice in the near future is all the motivation you need to push through the crux.

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Pawtuckaway: Pizza by George

Perhaps the best pizza in New Hampshire is right down the street from what’s probably the state’s best bouldering spot. Pizza by George in Raymond is perfect for cooling down after a hard day battling Pawtuckaway’s coarse granite boulders and cracks. Offering gourmet pizza by the slice, this place is a must-visit. But, be warned: These slices are more filling than they look. Insider tip: Save some room for a pepperoni roll or two—they’re delicious.

Rumney: The Common Cafe

For years, I bemoaned having to leave Rumney to drive to Plymouth for a decent post-send slice. That’s no longer an issue, thanks to The Common Cafe. Located in Rumney Village right on the way to the crag, The Common Cafe and Tavern features generously sized pizzas and super-fresh toppings. My inner dirtbag also appreciates the free popcorn they give you while you wait for your food. No one-trick pony, The Common Cafe and Tavern is as good for a coffee and breakfast sandwich earlier in the day as it is for a pizza and pint at the end. 

Cannon: GH Pizza

Rock climbers spending time on Cannon—or anywhere in Franconia Notch—should certainly pop into the town of Woodstock and grab a pie at GH Pizza. The best thing I can say about GH is that there isn’t much to say. The place is totally unassuming.

More specifically, GH makes Greek-style pie, and has a classic pizza-place ambiance. Along with great food, it offers reasonable prices and fast service. For this last point, the hungry climber in me really appreciates this.

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Crawford Notch: Catalano’s Pizzeria

Climbers in the Crawford Notch area are hard-pressed to find a place to eat, much less one that’s great. Catalano’s Pizzeria in Twin Mountain offers incredibly good pizza at reasonable prices, which is quite a trick, as they seemingly have no competition.

Ice climbers leaving Frankenstein will love the “large” large pizzas that always appear extra big. Generally, Catalano’s pizza is always loaded with cheese, and they never skimp on toppings, helping you to replace all the calories you just burned. Insider tip: Stash their number in your phone and call ahead. Things move a little bit slower this far north.

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North Conway: Moat Mountain Smokehouse & Brewing Co.

In addition to being New England’s climbing hub, North Conway is also northern New Hampshire’s busiest tourist destination. Thus, the town has an abundance of places to eat, and there is no shortage of great spots to grab a slice.

With that being said, after a hard day climbing Cathedral classics and sweating it out on Whitehorse slabs, I head to the Moat Mountain Smokehouse & Brewing Co. to calm my nerves with a fresh-brewed pint (or two) and a wood-grilled pizza. Also at this North Conway staple, you are sure to be surrounded by your climbing brethren. Just be careful with what you say, though. You never know if the guy sitting next to you made his first ascension on the route you thought was “a little soft for the grade.”