At-Home Training for Climbers

While we’re always psyched on climbing, the sad reality is you don’t always have enough time to visit the crag, boulders, or even the gym—especially during the work week. Lucky for us, there are numerous ways to stay strong and build climbing fitness without leaving the house. Try some of our basement beta, and you’ll realize that training in the home gym during the work week can translate to sending on the weekend.

Courtesy: Beastmaker
Courtesy: Beastmaker

Hangboard

Hangboards are one of the most popular at-home training aids. While that might be because they’re small, easy to mount, and inexpensive, these devices are also very effective. Climbers literally hang from a variety of different-sized pockets and holds to build finger strength. As a side note, this is why hangboards are also sometimes called fingerboards.

Pull-Up Bar

Although less climbing-specific, a pull-up bar suits anyone who wants to take a break from their fingerboard, rest sore fingers, or simply work larger muscles. In fact, you can use it in all manners to build climbing strength. To start, the classic pull-up is a great exercise for increasing pulling power. Then, Frenchies—pausing to lock off at certain angles through the movement of a pull-up—are a fantastic method for building endurance and simulating the pause climbers take when clipping a bolt or placing gear. Allez!

Courtesy: Sestogrado
Courtesy: Sestogrado

Rock Rings

No room for a hangboard? Don’t have a wall you’re comfortable drilling into? Live a life on the go? If you answered yes to any of these questions, rock rings may be the best solution. Used as a pair, these individually molded grips are suspended using a cord that can be hung from any number of anchors. Think about a basement beam, a backyard tree, or even a swing set at the local park. Although lacking the diversity of a hangboard, rock rings let you move freely. In turn, the motion places less strain on your joints compared to doing pull-ups or Frenchies, which involve a fixed position that may be hard on the elbows.

Courtesy: Reading Climbing Centre
Courtesy: Reading Climbing Centre

Campus Board

If you have a bit more room available, consider a campus board. Wolfgang Güllich devised its simple, utilitarian, and effective design to train for sending the world’s first 9A, Action Directe. On a series evenly spaced rungs on a slightly overhanging wall, climbers move up and down without using their feet to primarily build power. Additionally, you can increase finger and core strength and improve accuracy when moving between holds. Because of the physical demands, it’s not recommended for new or young climbers.

Crack Machine

Climbers looking to crush cracks can build a crack machine to practice technique and gain strength. Simple and easy to construct, crack machines feature two stiff wooden boards mounted to resemble a crack. And, while advanced constructors will create adjustable machines, most basement builders will find it easier to create multiple cracks in the sizes they want to train—primarily finger and hand. The best part is, a little goes a long way, and you can climb both up and down when training.

Home Wall

For those with room to spare, a home wall is the way to go. From mild to wild, a home wall can range from a simple mounted piece of plywood to a full build rivaling the rock gym. Whether it’s freestanding or mounted to the wall, the most important components are the holds. Consider a wide variety of shapes and sizes for increased diversity and fun in setting. Overall, the best home walls tend to be the most frequently used ones and ultimately do their job—getting you strong for climbing.

Courtesy: Moon Climbing
Courtesy: Moon Climbing

Moon Board

For pro climbers and those truly dedicated to getting strong, try a Moon Board. Back in the ‘80s, legendary U.K. climber Ben Moon devised the first Moon Board in his basement in Sheffield, England, and by the 2000s, the trend had caught on. Compact and simple in design, Moon Boards have a uniform size and configuration: 8.06 feet wide, 10.40 feet high, and positioned at a 40-degree angle. The holds are placed in fixed locations, creating a wall that is the same, no matter where it’s located. Because of the universal layout, it’s possible to project the same route as your buddy across the country, or your favorite pro climber.

As such, serious climbers can find thousands of established problems posted on moonboard.com and the MoonBoard App. Even better, with the addition of an LED system, you can download and illuminate the problems to make route finding easier.

Books

Strong fingers and abs only get you so far, especially if your training plan is haphazard, your mental game is lacking, or your technical skills are weak. If any of that rings a bell, check out one of these books for training your brain.

  • If you have the hangboard or home wall but are unsure of how to best use them, The Self-Coached Climber offers excellent advice for developing your own training plan. And, for something even more programmed, check out the training plans available from Uphill Athlete and the Mountain Tactical Institute.
  • For climbers truly looking to train their mind, The Rock Warrior’s Way is an insightful read about mental training.
  • The Mountain Guide Manual: The Comprehensive Reference—From Belaying to Rope Systems and Self-Rescue is an incredible technical skills guide that will greatly improve your climbing systems’ efficiency. Practice them at home, and you’ll find that you’ll have a lot more time to spend sending at the crag next weekend.

Have a training technique we didn’t mention? If so, tell us about it in the comments.


Stretch Out: 7 Yoga Poses for Paddlers

Waters have thawed, temperatures are rising, and the days keep getting longer. So, it’s time to dust off your paddling gear and head to your favorite aquatic playground, if you haven’t already. While you have plenty of things to think about as you prepare for the start of paddling season, be sure to give your body the attention it deserves, too. To help you out, here are seven yoga poses to practice before your first (or next) paddling sesh—or after. Or, if you’re on a stand-up paddleboard, you can even practice these poses while you’re still on the water.

Credit: Ashley Peck
Credit: Ashley Peck

Thread the Needle

Strong shoulders are key for paddling, whether you’re in a kayak or on a paddleboard. This pose is a great way to both wake them up before getting onto the water and stretch them out when you get back to shore.

Begin on all fours in tabletop pose, with your knees directly under the hips and wrists in line with the shoulders. Use an inhale to lift your right arm out to the side, and then, send it underneath the left arm as you exhale. In the process, bring the right shoulder and the right side of your head to the ground, as the left arm reaches out in front of you. Rest here for about 10 breaths before returning to tabletop and repeating on the other side.

  • Variation: To make the pose a little more “active,” you can reach the non-threaded arm up toward the sky, or rest the back of that hand on your lower back.
  • Variation: To make it a little more “restful,” either begin in child’s pose instead of tabletop, or ease the hips down toward the heels once you’ve settled into the twist.
Credit: Ashley Peck
Credit: Ashley Peck

Side Plank

As with most sports, core strength is also vital for paddling. Standard planks are an efficient way to strengthen both the core and your arms, but since paddling’s mechanics mean that one side of the body works at a time, side planks are particularly beneficial for kayakers and SUPers.

From tabletop, step back into high plank, with your feet together, and press through the heels to create a strong, straight line from the heels to your head. Shift your weight into your right arm as you rotate onto the outside edge of the right foot, and lift your left arm toward the sky. Keep your feet stacked if you can, or take one of the variations offered below. Hold for as long as you comfortably can, and then, repeat on the left side.

  • Variation: Take things down a notch by bringing the right knee down to the floor, so that your lower leg and foot point behind you.
  • Variation: Challenge yourself (and work your core a little more) by lifting up your left leg.
cobra
Credit: Ashley Peck

Cobra

Sitting in your boat for hours at a time can lead to a stiff lower back. As well, keeping your arms raised in paddling position may leave your shoulders, chest, and arms feeling fatigued. Fortunately, cobra pose may help with all of that.

Lower yourself all the way to your belly from plank, with your legs together and stretched out long behind you. If you’re extra motivated, go ahead and throw in some push-ups here. Keeping your hands under the shoulders and elbows close to the body, press the tops of your feet, your thighs, and your pelvis into the floor, and push through the palms to begin lifting your upper body.

Lift yourself as far as is comfortable. You may be able to fully straighten your arms, or you may need to keep a bend in the elbows—either way is fine. Focus on opening up the front of your body by gently lifting your sternum while simultaneously “squeezing” your shoulder blades together. Hold for five breaths, and then, release back down to the floor on an exhale. Repeat two or three times. 

Credit: Ashley Peck
Credit: Ashley Peck

Down Dog Twist

Even though it may feel like your upper body does most of the work, your legs also play an important role in paddling. They help steer and stabilize your boat while you’re kayaking, and they’re kind of important when it comes to the “SU” part of SUPing. The beauty of down dog twist is that it stretches the leg muscles just like traditional downward-facing dog while also stretching out the shoulders a little more and helping build rotational core strength, which is where your paddling power comes from.

When you’re finished with cobra, press back up to tabletop. Then, begin working your way into downward-facing dog, but with your feet a little bit wider apart than the usual hip distance. On an exhale, reach your right hand back toward the left leg, taking hold of your calf or ankle—whichever feels best—and let your gaze come under the left armpit. Hold for a few breaths, return to down dog on an inhale, and then, repeat on the opposite side.

Credit: Ashley Peck
Credit: Ashley Peck

Chair Twist

Similar to the way down dog twist addresses the shoulders and core while stretching the legs, chair twist does the same while strengthening the legs. In addition, both of these twisting poses can help strengthen the lower back, which in turn helps you avoid paddler’s back pain.

Start in a regular chair pose (feet together or hip-distance apart, lowering the hips toward the floor, and keeping your weight in the heels) with hands at heart center. Use an inhale to lengthen through the spine, and then, bring your right elbow toward the left outer thigh on an exhale. Peek down at your knees to make sure they stay facing forward and are even with each other. Keep pressing your palms into one another to stretch out your shoulders, or spread your wings (right hand toward the floor, and left arm reaching high) to open up through the chest. Stay here for about 30 seconds, and then, switch sides.

Credit: Ashley Peck
Credit: Ashley Peck

Boat Twist

Even if it weren’t so appropriately named, boat twist would still be an important pose for paddlers to practice. Just as traditional boat pose improves core strength and balance, so, too, does boat twist—with the added benefit of working the obliques to continue building rotational core strength.

Bring yourself to a seated position with your feet flat on the floor. Inhale to lengthen through the spine, and then, exhale to lean back into boat pose with the knees bent and lower legs parallel to the floor. Keep your core engaged, and twist toward the right on your next exhale, reaching your right arm back and sending the left hand toward your feet. Hold for five breaths before returning to center, and then, repeat on the other side.

  • Variation: If you can extend your legs in boat pose, try crossing your right leg over the left, and holding onto the inside of your left foot with the left hand as you twist to the right. When you switch sides, do the opposite.
Credit: Ashley Peck
Credit: Ashley Peck

Half Lord of the Fishes

We’ll wrap things up with one more twist, since having a strong, fully mobile torso is so vital to both kayaking and paddleboarding. Again, even if half lord of the fishes didn’t have such a perfect name, it would be a pose every paddler should practice regularly. In addition to the benefits of the other twisting poses we’ve done, this one also provides a gentle stretch through the hips, which will feel particularly amazing after you spend the day sitting in a kayak.

Start seated with your legs extended in front of you. Hug your right knee in toward the chest, and then, cross the right leg over the left, so that your right foot is on the floor next to your left thigh. Bend your left leg to bring the left foot toward your right hip. On an inhale, sit up nice and tall. As you exhale, twist toward the right, pressing your right hand into the floor just behind you for support and bringing the left upper arm to the outside of your right thigh. Hold the twist for up to one minute, and then, repeat on the opposite side.

  • Variation: If bringing the left arm to the outside of the right leg is too intense, simply use the arm to hug your leg instead.

Video: Meet the First Woman to Run the Boston Marathon

Kathrine Switzer’s Boston Marathon back in 1967 required dodging angry race officials as much as it required running 26.2 miles.


Maintaining Your Waterproof Shoes and Boots

Investing in a good pair of waterproof hiking boots or sneakers is a smart move. After all, your feet are in almost constant contact with the ground and elements while you’re walking or running. Getting them dirty is part of the adventure, a rite of passage even. But, did you realize you should be putting in some routine maintenance to preserve the waterproofness and materials? Mud can degrade leather by removing moisture, and leftover dirt and sand can actually break down shoe materials through constant friction while you walk. Don’t stress, though. A few minutes can go a long way in extending your shoes’ useful lifespan.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

Cleaning Your Footwear

It’s important to keep your shoes clean and free of mud and debris. If you’re like most hikers, you probably change out of those squishy and smelly boots at the trailhead and stuff them in a plastic bag to be forgotten about in the trunk of your car. As tired as you might be after an epic hike or long run, it’s important to not let them sit for more than a day or two.

What you’ll need: water, a vegetable brush and/or toothbrush, and a mild soap or cleaner, like NIKWAX Footwear Cleaning Gel

How To: Begin by removing the insoles and laces. Next, clap your boots together or against a hard surface outside to remove any caked-on muck and stones or gravel that may be lodged in the treads. If sticky gunk like sap is an issue, throw them in the freezer to harden it, and then pry it off with a dull knife. Next, rinse them thoroughly with water while using a brush to scrub grime out of the tough spots. You can use a bit of soap or cleaning gel, but no harsh detergents that may damage boot materials. For extra-stinky boots, use a 1:2 mixture of vinegar and water. If you encounter dusty or sandy trails, use a vacuum with the hose attachment to remove the fine particles from both the outside and inside of your boot. Lastly, don’t neglect your shoes’ soles. Make sure to thoroughly clear them of trapped debris to ensure optimal traction and to prevent breakdown of the rubber.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

Conditioning Your Leather Footwear

Full-grain leather, which looks smooth, is the only leather that requires conditioning. In turn, doing so keeps the material soft and pliable, which then prevents cracking.

What you’ll need: cloth and leather conditioner (NO oils like mink) like NIKWAX Leather Conditioner

How To: Leather conditioner is typically applied to dry boots, but check the manufacturer’s instructions first. Apply a generous but sensible amount of conditioner. While the conditioner helps keep the leather soft, too much can reduce the support the boot should provide. Use a damp cloth to remove excess, and buff to polish.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

Protect and Waterproof Your Footwear

Luckily, you don’t need to re-waterproof your boots or sneakers after every use. You’ll know it’s time when water droplets no longer bead on the surface and, instead, are readily absorbed into the material.

What you’ll need: Waterproof wax or application like NIKWAX Waterproofing wax

How To: Begin with clean, wet boots with water fully soaked into the material. Generally, you’ll apply the waterproof agent, let it sit for a few minutes, and then, wipe away any excess, but be sure to follow the directions on the packaging. Waterproofing agents come in various forms, such as creams that get dabbed and liquids that get sprayed on.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

Drying and Storing Your Footwear

It’s important to let your boots dry thoroughly to prevent mold from forming and materials from breaking down. A low-humidity environment is key, and you can speed up the process by using a fan or boot dryer or stuffing newspaper in each shoe. However, be sure to steer clear of heat, including fireplaces, which can damage materials and weaken adhesives. Dry the insoles separately, and do not put them back into the boot until both are completely dry. Then, store the boots in a well-ventilated area, and avoid garages and attics, both of which are notoriously damp and hot.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

When Should I Retire My Footwear?

If you keep up on shoe maintenance, they’ll last forever, right? Not quite. So, how do you know when to toss ‘em? The number of miles a pair boots or sneakers has traveled can be a decent rule of thumb. You can expect hiking boots to get between 500 to 1,000 miles, while running shoes can typically see between 300 to 500 miles. These large ranges account for the many variables that cause wear and tear, such as ground surface and conditions. Visually inspect your shoes every so often for frayed, cracking, or separating materials. Cracking of the sole, compression lines, and worn treads also clearly indicate you’re due for some new kicks. Also, pay attention to your body. If your feet or joints hurt sooner or worse than usual or if you’re starting to get “hot spots,” it’s probably time to retire your boots.

 

Taking a little bit of time to care for and maintain your waterproof footwear ultimately prolongs its use. Following these basic steps will have you and your boots on the trail to happiness for years to come!


7 Reasons You Should Take Your Running Off-Road

There’s no denying that road running is a great workout. It’s perhaps the most convenient way to exercise, but it’s not always the most enjoyable. There are cars to contend with, it can be jarring to your body, and running the same few loops through your town eventually just gets boring.

If you’ve found yourself tending toward the “hate” end of your love-hate relationship with running lately, it might be time to try taking your runs off-road. Trails are a lot like roads, except they’re a little more challenging and far more enjoyable. There are plenty of reasons it’s worth switching from pavement to dirt, starting with these seven:

1. It’s a good excuse to slow down

Sure, running fast has its benefits—and getting faster is often a runner’s main goal—but slowing down every once in a while is good for you, too. The road, however, has a sneaky way of making runners feel like they constantly need to push their pace. When you hit the trail, the roots, rocks, uneven terrain, and steeper inclines naturally force you to run slower. In fact, expect a pace anywhere from 30 seconds to two minutes slower than your typical rate. But, you’ll never feel guilty about it.

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2. There’s no traffic

If you enjoy the smell of exhaust, horns honking, doing that silly jog-in-place thing road runners do at intersections, and the risk of getting hit by a car, then by all means keep pounding the pavement. But, if you’re looking for a way to get away from all the noise, fill your lungs with fresh air, only stop when you want to, and not have to worry about being pancaked, it’s time to hit the trail. As a bonus, the animals you’ll see will generally be alive, instead of mangled in the middle of the road—just be sure to keep your distance from them.

3. The scenery is way better

Every once in a while on a road run, I’ll pass by a building or house that looks cool enough to make me slow down and stare for a second. Most of the time, though, there’s nothing truly fascinating or beautiful to look at when you hit the streets. Trails, on the other hand, are much more aesthetically pleasing, from the colors, including lush greens in spring and summer, bright reds and yellows and oranges in the fall, and enchanting crystalline whites in the winter, to the way the sun shines through the trees to reaching scenic vistas and overlooks. Nothing you see on the road will ever beat the magic of the wilderness.

4. You’ll develop greater proprioception

In addition to being a fun word to say, proprioception is hugely important when it comes to running. After all, without awareness of where your body and its parts are in space, you wouldn’t be able to run without looking down at your feet the entire time. With all of the extra obstacles trail running presents—things like rocks, roots, fallen trees, and water crossings—your proprioceptors get as good a workout as the rest of you. In turn, this leads to better stability, balance, and the ability to better judge when and how to adjust your stride whenever you encounter one of those aforementioned obstacles.

5. It’s easier on your joints

There’s a reason people refer to road running as “pounding pavement.” Paved roads are hard, and every time your foot strikes down, a shockwave runs through your body. Of course, our bodies are designed to handle this kind of stress, and for the most part, they’re really good at it. But, over time, it can lead to trouble, especially in your knees. Running on trails reduces some of that stress. Particularly, the ground is softer, allowing your foot to slightly sink in when it lands and absorbing some of the shock before it makes its way up your leg.

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6. It’s a better workout

Running on the road is an incredible workout. It builds strength in the legs, increases cardio fitness, and burns a lot of calories. Running on a trail does all of that, in addition to naturally incorporating lateral (side to side) movements by forcing you to avoid obstacles, improving balance, and potentially burning even more calories.

7. It makes you faster on the road

Because trail running offers a better overall workout—especially if you do your hill repeats in the woods, which generally have steeper, more sustained inclines than paved hills—your overall running fitness and economy will improve. Don’t be surprised when your road running paces start to get faster as you spend more time on the trails.

 

Now you tell me: Are you a trail running convert? What made you switch? Or, are you sticking it out on the road (and why)? Leave your thoughts in the comments!


Stretch it Out: 7 Yoga Stretches To Do After a Day on the Slopes

I love a proper après just as much as the next person. But, after a long day on the slopes, a good stretch can be just as satisfying as a good brew. Throwing in a few yoga poses before getting hydrated not only helps the body recover from the runs taken that day, but it will also help build strength in all the right places, so you’ll be as ready as ever for your next ski day.

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1. Reclined Child’s Pose

Skiing and snowboarding both ask a lot of your feet and ankles. So, let’s give them a break for a few minutes by lying down. Then, hug the knees in toward the chest, and slowly roll your feet around a few times in each direction to give the ankles some love. Your hips have also done a lot of work, so go ahead and “draw” circles in the air with your knees (one at a time or both together) to relieve some of the tension there, as well. If you’re still not quite ready to come up yet, take some time to gently roll back and forth for a nice little back massage first.

  • Variation: If hugging the knees toward your chest is uncomfortable, try guiding them toward the armpits instead.

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2. Downward-Facing Dog

There’s a reason yoga classes typically involve so many down dogs. Well, actually, there are a lot of reasons. For skiers and boarders, some of the more relevant benefits of this “basic” pose include stretching and toning hamstrings and calves, working the small stabilizer muscles in the feet and ankles, and strengthening the muscles in your back and core.

To come into your Downward-Facing Dog, start on your hands and knees, with your toes tucked under. On an exhale, press through your hands, and start to lift the knees off the floor while keeping them slightly bent. As your spine begins to lengthen, start to straighten the legs, pressing your heels toward the floor and being careful not to lock out your knees. Keep in mind that they don’t have to touch all the way down! Then, take a few moments to “walk your dog” by pedaling through the feet, before you settle into stillness. As you do this, still actively press through the hands, working the heels toward the floor and lifting the hips high. Hold the pose for as long as you are comfortable, ideally up to two minutes.

  • Variation 1: With extra-tight calves or hammies, straightening the legs can feel not-so-great. Instead, try keeping a gentle bend in the knees to take some of the pressure off the backs of your legs.
  • Variation 2: If your wrists get cranky in this pose, practice Dolphin Pose instead by lowering onto your forearms while keeping the rest of your alignment the same.

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3. Standing Forward Fold

From Downward-Facing Dog, walk the feet up toward the hands on an inhale, keeping your feet about hip-distance apart and your knees as bent as they can stay comfortable. If possible, allow your palms or fingertips to rest on the floor. Otherwise, let your arms simply dangle, use the hands to clasp opposite elbows, or give yourself a hug by wrapping your arms around your legs. Spend anywhere from five to 10 breaths here to give your calves, hamstrings, and hips a well-earned stretch. This also makes it easier to buckle your boots or strap into your bindings without sitting down the next time you hit the slopes.

  • Variation: If your shoulders and upper back are asking for some attention, try my favorite variation. Wrap your arms around your legs, cross the wrists behind your calves, and hold the shins with opposite hands: right hand to left shin, and left hand to right shin.

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4. Chair Pose

I know, I know. You’ve basically been in this position all day, and now that you’re off the mountain, it’s the last thing you want to do. But, trust me. This is definitely a “hurts so good” kind of thing. By holding this variation of a squat, the entire leg, from ankle to thigh, gets stronger. Many sports injuries—and not just from snow sports—happen when muscles get fatigued and your form gets sloppy. The way I see it, if holding Chair Pose for 30 to 60 seconds now makes it easier to maintain proper form for an extra run or two on your next ski day, it’s worth the burn!

Come into Chair Pose from Standing Forward Fold by bending your knees and lifting the upper body, keeping your spine long and strong. Keep your hips as low as you comfortably can without letting your knees move past your toes. Ideally, your knees should be more or less in line with the ankles. So, try shifting your weight into the heels and lifting your toes to ensure all of the leg muscles are getting in on the action, rather than making your quads do all the work. You can reach your arms overhead, and bring the palms together at heart center. Or, if you haven’t already put them away, hold onto your ski poles for extra “authenticity.”

  • Variation: If you shredded the gnar a little too hard today and can’t possibly hold yourself up in this pose, do a wall sit instead. You’ll still reap the benefits of Chair Pose, but the wall will take out some of the work for you.

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5. Warrior I & II

The first two Warrior Poses are just about as common as downward-facing dog in a typical yoga class, and for just as many reasons. These poses have a sneaky way of working almost every part of the body—just like skiing and snowboarding. Not only do Warrior I and II stretch and tone your thighs, calves, and ankles, but they also strengthen your shoulders, chest, and back, work the psoas (deep-core muscles responsible for, among other things, maintaining good posture and stabilizing your spine), and help increase stamina.

To come into Warrior I, first settle into a high lunge by stepping your right leg back about three to four feet and bending into the left leg, so that the knee is over the ankle and your thigh is almost parallel to the floor. Once you’ve adjusted your stance and are comfortable, spin your right heel down, so that the foot is somewhere between 45 and 90 degrees, while keeping your hips and upper body facing forward.

  • Variation: Stay in high lunge with the back heel lifted, if taking it to the floor puts too much strain on the back leg.

Reach your arms overhead, and gaze up at your fingertips— only if it’s comfortable for your neck.

Hold Warrior I for five to 10 breaths, and then, transition into Warrior II on an exhale by rotating your torso to the right, opening your arms out to the sides and parallel to the floor, and resting your gaze wherever is most comfortable. Traditionally, this is over the left fingertips. Stay in Warrior II for five to 10 breaths, and then, repeat both poses on the opposite side.

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6. One-Legged King Pigeon Pose

You may not notice it at the time, but while you’re busy having the best day ever sliding downhill, your hips are working overtime—especially if you’re skinning or booting up the mountain to earn those turns. Now that you’re done for the day, it’s time to reward those hips for their hard work with Pigeon Pose. Start in Downward-Facing Dog, lift your right leg, and shift your weight forward while hugging the right knee into the chest. Then, set the right leg down, resting the right knee behind the right wrist and the right ankle near the left wrist. Press your palms or fingertips into the floor to keep the spine long, and rest here for 30 to 60 seconds to help lengthen your hip flexors, increase your hips’ range of motion, and stretch the hamstrings. Repeat on the left side.

  • Variation 1: If it feels okay, walk the hands away from you. Then, fold the upper body down to also work into the lower back.
  • Variation 2: If your quads could use a deeper stretch, bend the back knee, and reach for the foot, ankle, or shin with your hand.
  • Variation 3: If this expression of Pigeon Pose causes too much stress, strain, or pain anywhere in your body, try performing a Figure 4 stretch while sitting in a chair or lying on your back instead.

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7. Boat Pose

To wrap up your post-ski or snowboard yoga session, spend some time in Half Boat Pose to strengthen your core, including the psoas, spine, and hip flexors, and to stretch out the hamstrings a little bit more. Start by coming into a seated position with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Engage the core, and lift your arms out in front of you. Then, without rounding the spine, slowly start to lean back and lift the legs, until they’re in line with the arms and your calves are parallel to the floor. Hold for three to five breaths, release, and repeat one or two more times.

  • Variation 1: Hold onto the backs of the thighs, instead of keeping the arms outstretched, for additional support.
  • Variation 2: If you’re up for more of a challenge, begin to straighten the legs into “full” Boat Pose.

A Guide to Trail Running Shoes: Basic Types & Characteristics

In theory, trail running should be one of the simplest sports to understand: Find a nice stretch, lace up your sneakers, and go. However, as the sport has matured, the idea of what constitutes trail running has shifted. In response, the shoes have evolved to accommodate everything from running technique to terrain.

Because of this, shopping for the “right” trail runner can be a daunting task. Deciphering the various classifications and their meanings is essentially akin to learning a new language. And, while I wouldn’t let the lack of the “right” pair keep you from speeding along some dreamy singletrack, having the proper shoes keeps your feet happy, maximizes your performance, and maybe even helps prevent injuries.

The Basics

Trying to categorize trail runners is pretty difficult, as the industry doesn’t have any specific criteria. Further complicating matters, as trail runners adapt to athletes’ growing needs, several characteristics overlap between categories. As such, for many, personal preference dictates use.

For lack of a better system, the heel-toe drop classifies each type. This simple measurement indicates the difference between the height of the heel and the toe box, creating a spectrum that runs from barely-there minimalist shoes, such as the Merrell Vapor Glove, to cloud-like maximalist types, like the Hoka One One Speedgoat.

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Barefoot

A zero heel-toe drop, no arch support, no cushioning, and a wide toe box identify barefoot trail runners. Outdoors, this basic design offers your feet slight protection from common hazards like thorns and sharp rocks. In other words, they’re only slightly better than actually being barefoot.

The philosophy behind barefoot shoes is, over the last hundred-thousand years or so, the human body evolved to run without big, supportive footwear. Barefoot runners argue that today’s traditional running shoes have altered the way we move—by encouraging landing on our heels instead of on our toes. As a result, those in this camp have turned to shoes like the Vibram FiveFingers Classic Multisport.

Barefoot runners additionally believe that this biomechanical shift in stride has not only made us less efficient, but has also increased our injury risks. Those using this technique will tell you that the lack of a thick, protective sole and a layer of cushioning between them and the ground makes them feel more connected to the trail. In turn, the design supposedly results in more comfort when you run technical terrain.

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Minimalist

Minimalist shoes are often referred to as, and are mistaken for, barefoot shoes. This confusion exemplifies why, in recent years, classifying trail runners has become convoluted. The dividing line is, people who like the idea of barefoot running but want more support and cushioning opt for a minimalist pair.

These shoes commonly feature some heel-toe drop, but the ramp (or drop between the heel and toe) is, well, minimal. As well, they combine the feeling of a barefoot shoe with some of the more traditional features. Like barefoot trail runners, minimalist styles encourage landing on the forefoot rather than the heels.

Minimalist shoes, such as the La Sportiva Helios 2.0, are perfect for East Coast trail runners who are looking to find their natural stride but are concerned about the trails’ many obstacles. Specifically, a more protective sole and a small amount of cushioning can be a welcome barrier against sharp rocks, pointy acorns, and rough roots.

Although I am not a minimalist devotee, I love these shoes for short runs on moderate terrain when I’m trying to be fast. Sadly, being a bigger person and not the smoothest of striders, I have to ditch my pair for longer distance runs.

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Traditional

Traditional trail runners constitute the majority of the shoes at your local Eastern Mountain Sports. As the name implies, these are constructed in a similar manner to those you’ve been wearing your entire life. These types, like the La Sportiva Wildcat 3.0 (one of my all-time favorites), have more padding in the heel than in the forefoot, which creates a noticeable ramp and encourages a heel-first stride.

Perhaps the best case I can make for traditional trail runners is, to quote the old saying, “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” Many of us, myself included, have been running without issue in this type since our first steps, and changing shoes, along with technique, could be inviting disaster.

Because of this, I log most of my miles in traditional trail runners. Although barefoot and minimalist runners may feel more connected, I have found that, thanks to the additional cushioning, I can run over objects they have to avoid.

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Maximalist

Differing from the three aforementioned categories, maximalist shoes don’t emphasize heel-toe drop. Rather, they shift the focus to cushioning. Here, the incredible amount of material between the sole and footbed clearly identifies this style. Just check out the Hoka One One Speedgoat to see what I mean.

If the idea of bounding down mountain trails while feeling like you’re hopping along clouds is appealing, these shoes might be for you. Maximalist trail runners believe that the additional cushioning is easier on their joints and reduces fatigue, helping to prevent injuries and keep them running longer.

The negative, however, can be a loss of ground-feel. And, in my experience, the additional height may reduce your control when you’re running technical trails or steep downhills.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Other Considerations

Of course, this is just a simple breakdown of today’s trail running options. You still need to consider a handful of other factors when picking your next pair, such as:

Waterproofing

In my experience, a non-waterproof trail runner is ideal for about 90 percent of my journeys. They’re cooler, allow your feet to breathe better, and dry quickly when they get wet. The only time I choose a waterproof model, like the Brooks Cascadia 11 GTX (the waterproof version of an all-time favorite), is for colder runs in early spring and late fall.

Tread

When thinking about the type of tread you need, keep in mind a few things. Most importantly, have a clear picture of which type of trail running you envision yourself doing.

For instance, runners striving for the mountains will want a shoe like the Salomon Speedcross 4, a style with a more aggressive tread and deeper lugs. On the other hand, people who might be running some roads on the way or who plan to do less-technical terrain like rail trails will find a less-aggressive tread, such as those on the Salomon X-Mission 3, is ideal.

Foam or Rock Plate

Most trail running shoes, barefoot runners excluded, offer some protection against hazards by incorporating foam or a rock plate into the midsole. Those that use the former as a means of protection benefit from more cushioning and shock absorption, while trail runners utilizing a rock plate have better trail feel and more precise foot placement.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

While finding a type of shoe can be daunting, know that the only wrong choice is not getting off the road and onto the trail for your next run. Over the years, I have experimented with all kinds of trail runners, and even though I’ve settled on a traditional pair, I still incorporate minimalist shoes to work on my stride and exercise under-used muscles. And, I think about buying a pair of Hokas every shift I work.


A Guide to Running Boston's Blue Hills Skyline Trail

Located just outside of Boston, the Blue Hills Skyline Trail takes runners on a nine-mile traverse across the heart of the Blue Hills Reservation and offers metropolitan New Englanders a classic trail run. With approximately 2,000 feet of elevation gain and some of the region’s most technical up-and-down terrain, it’s a great test-piece that’s well worth checking out.

If you are running the full traverse for the first time, it’s best to begin from the parking lot at Shea Rink in Quincy. From that trailhead, it’s easy to follow the Skyline’s rectangular blue-blazes, especially if you print a copy of the map ahead of time. Road crossings segment the Skyline into the six distinct sections, letting you break it up into bite-sized chunks:

Credit: John Dill
Credit: John Dill

The Opening Salvo

The first section—between Shea Rink and Wampatuck Road—is so short that I consider it my warm up. Through its flat single and double track, you’ll have breezed by St. Moritz Pond after just a few minutes and be preparing to cross Wampatuck Road.

The second section begins as the Skyline makes a sharp, well-marked southwest turn just after the road crossing. From there, the trail climbs gradually on rocky but runnable terrain, going past an old quarry and then to the summit of Rattlesnake Hill. After, the trail then quickly descends over some technical terrain, which usually has me regretting bypassing the easier way down on the runner’s right, before ascending up and over Wampatuck Hill to Chickatawbut Road.

Credit: John Dill
Credit: John Dill

The Crux

To Chickatawbut Hill

The next three sections put the meat on the Skyline’s bones. The first, easy to underestimate, traverses Nahanton, Kitchamkin, Fenno, and Chickatawbut Hills. Up to Chickatawbut Hill, a current Mass Audubon facility and former Nike missile base, the trail flows well and is runnable. Be mentally prepared, however, for the section’s up-and-down nature. Here, you’ll almost immediately be giving back (and then re-earning) all that hard-won elevation.

After Chickatawbut Hill, the Skyline has a lengthy descent to the Route 28 road crossing. A short portion goes down a rocky outcropping and requires careful route-finding, until you can escape to easier terrain in the woods on the runner’s right.

Credit: Bill Iliot
Credit: Bill Iliot

Fourth Section

Once you’ve made it across Route 28, the fourth section begins with one of the traverse’s steepest climbs. But, the ascent is well worth it, and I often find myself pausing momentarily on Buck Hill’s open summit to appreciate the fantastic 360-degree view.

Before you get too far, make sure to look back northeast at Boston Harbor and the city skyline. Then, run off Buck Hill, across North Boyce Hill, and up steep Tucker Hill, the final climb, before heading downhill to Hillside Street and Reservation Headquarters.

As the Skyline’s only facility beyond the halfway point, Reservation Headquarters has a seasonal outdoor water fountain and, during business hours, an indoor public bathroom.

Credit: John Dill
Credit: John Dill

North and South Skyline

From Headquarters, the Skyline temporarily splits into the North Skyline and the South Skyline, eventually rejoining near the summit of Great Blue Hill. Standing 635 feet tall, Great Blue Hill is the tallest point within 10 miles of the Atlantic Coast, south of Maine.

Of the two options, the North Skyline, with its traverse of Hancock, Hemingway, and Wolcott Hills, is a more aesthetically pleasing east-to-west route. It is also the more technical of the two, with a few short but steeper-than-you’d-expect-for-Greater-Boston descents.

Taking the North Skyline also allows you to run by the two most well-known attractions on Big Blue, the Eliot Tower and the Eliot Memorial Bridge, before the trail meets up with the South Skyline near the Blue Hill Meteorological Observatory. Both are named after Charles Eliot, the landscape architect who helped design many of Greater Boston’s parks. The Skyline then loops around the Observatory, the oldest continuously operating one in the country, before making a comparatively lengthy descent to the Route 28 road crossing.

The Final Sprint

Assuming you have some energy left, the Skyline’s final section is a good place to push it and try to surpass a personal record. In no time, you’ll dispatch Little Blue Hill, the section’s only climb, cross a side street, and be nearing the trail’s western-terminus. And, then, it’s over, ending anticlimactically at an unmarked finish line near an Interstate 95 on-ramp.

Credit: John Dill
Credit: John Dill

Skyline Loop

If you don’t have time for the full traverse or only have one car, the Skyline Loop (3.5 miles, with 800 feet of elevation gain) is a great alternative. It starts on the North Skyline at the Reservation Headquarters on Hillside Street, traverses west across Hancock, Hemingway, and Wolcott Hills as described above, and then meets with the South Skyline on Great Blue Hill.

The South Skyline brings you back east, eventually climbing Houghton Hill before dropping down to Hillside Street and then requiring a short jog back to Reservation Headquarters. And, with the multiplicity of trails leaving from this location, it’s easy to tack on extra mileage at the end if you are still feeling fresh.


Top 6 Places for Trail Running Around Saratoga Springs

Most people associate Saratoga Springs with horse racing, summer concerts at SPAC, or the bustling downtown with its many pedestrians, shops, and eateries. But, you don’t have to leave the city to find a piece of nature and hit the trails.

The Saratoga area is home to a myriad of off-pavement routes with varying terrain and scenery, offering excellent trail running for beginners, more advanced folks looking for a technical challenge, and everyone in between. As you’re already in the city, you can grab some hard-earned food or drink downtown or on picturesque Saratoga Lake after your run! Beforehand, stop by the EMS in Wilton to make sure you have everything you need!

 

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

1. Saratoga Spa State Park

~15 miles of trails
Terrain: Flat to rolling; a few short, moderate hills
Surface: Dirt, grass, pavement
Recommended Run: Five Mile Trail
Trailhead Parking: Plenty. You can easily access trails from almost anywhere in the park.

The Spa State Park may seem like an obvious place to enjoy the outdoors, but hidden beyond the towering pines are miles of dirt trails. With numerous trails, paths, and park roads, there’s something for everyone. As such, you can “choose your own adventure” based on your experience, mood, or the trail conditions.

The Five Mile Trail, designated by yellow markers, is a dirt loop with a few paved sections that doubles as an excellent tour of the park. You’ll often be in woods but also see the areas of the park that attract its many visitors: a natural geyser, mineral springs, the historic Hall of Springs, Geyser Creek, wetlands, and the reflecting pool, to name a few.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

For beginners or those who haven’t hit the trails in a while, the park is an ideal place to visit. Particularly, it offers many paved trails and roads providing options for shortening your route. Thus, it’s easy to jump off the trails if you need a break or if you encounter less-than-ideal conditions, such as ice or mud.

Bonus: Bathrooms (open in late spring through early fall) are present at the many picnic pavilions scattered throughout and have a few spigots to fill up your water supply. Make sure, however, it’s a spring and not a mineral water location.

 

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

2. Hemlock and Karner Blue Butterfly Areas

~1.7 miles of Hemlock Trails and ~2 miles of trails in the Karner Area
Terrain: Flat
Surface: Dirt, sand, grass
Recommended Run: Combine these areas for a longer route.
Trailhead Parking: Designated dirt area off Crescent Avenue for the Hemlock Trail and a paved parking lot off Crescent Street for the Karner Blue Butterfly Area.

Although technically part of Saratoga Spa State Park (view a map), both of these routes are slightly removed from the main area, providing a more secluded experience. As a result, they’re a great place to escape when SPAC has a major concert or event and also offer unique biodiversity worth exploring.

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

The Hemlock area offers two trails, denoted by blue and green markers. While the former is easy to follow with four bridges traversing wet areas, the latter is less traveled and can become overgrown, so beware if you’re wearing shorts. As well, the Hemlock area is home to forested wetlands and the most expansive area of native forest in the State Park. Around you, you’ll see old-growth hemlock and rare perched swamp white oak trees.

To extend your time outdoors, combine either of these with the Karner Blue Butterfly Area trails. Keep your eyes peeled for wild blue lupine and the endangered Karner blue butterfly, as the area recently underwent habitat restoration to help preserve the species.

Aside from stumbling across the occasional exposed tree root, you’ll find that sandy soils mostly comprise this path. Here, they’re needed for the butterfly habitat and also make for a cushy run.

 

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

3. Daniel’s Road State Forest Trails

~15 miles of trails over 523 acres
Terrain: Rolling to hilly; some short, steep inclines
Surface: Dirt, rock, roots (can be rugged)
Recommended Trails: Bee, Here to There
Trailhead Parking: On the north side of Daniels Road, at the intersection with Clinton Street

This area is popular with mountain bikers and is ideal for anyone looking for a fun and technically challenging trail run. Due to the rugged terrain, extensive trail system, and shared use, however, this route is recommended for intermediate to advanced trail runners who are comfortable on varied surfaces and have decent wayfinding skills.

The Carriage Road loop, which begins from the parking area, is wide, well-established, and easy to follow, albeit often rocky. Use it to get your feet wet (literally) and access the many other trails, like Bee. Bee is an enjoyable route that will have you feeling like a mountain goat while zigzagging up and over large rock outcrops, around trees, and over roots.

Bee ends at a junction with the Main Trail (denoted by red markers). From here, take a right (north) to access more winding trails, such as Ridgeline or Here to There. Or, take a left (south) to get back to the Carriage Road, and you’ll get treated to a pleasant view of a calm, swamp-like pond.

Because the trails can be hard to follow in certain areas, carrying a map is highly recommended. Also, since you may encounter mountain bikers and narrow passages, be sure to stay alert while running here.

 

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

4. Skidmore North Woods Trails

~3.5 miles of trails over 150 acres
Terrain: Rolling to hilly; some moderate hills
Surface: Dirt, rocks, roots, boardwalks
Recommended Run: Hit all the trails, and then, cool down with a stroll around campus
Trailhead Parking: Falstaff’s Parking Lot on the Skidmore campus

Skidmore College, a small private liberal arts school, is just a mile north of downtown Saratoga and maintains 150 acres of ecologically interesting woods. The North Woods are home to unique flora and fauna, and the school offers over 30 college courses related to them.

For trail running, red, blue, or orange markers indicate primary routes and a handful of connector trails. Thanks to the North Woods’ steward program, these are well marked and maintained, although some can be quite rocky and root covered. In recent years, boardwalks have also been installed over chronically wet areas. As you move along, you’ll find a few moderate-to-steep hills that really get your heart pumping, and a small stream provides an attractive area to cool off.

If you’re looking to get into more challenging trail running, this is a good place to start. Compared to the State Park, the terrain here is more technical. But, the trails are wide and relatively short and feature stretches of easier ground and boardwalks.

 

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

5. Woods Hollow Nature Preserve

~3 miles of trails over 130 acres
Terrain: Flat to rolling; a few moderate-to-steep inclines
Surface: Dirt
Recommended Run: All of the trails! Get close to the lake on the red trail or overlook it from higher ground on a yellow trail.
Trailhead Parking: Off Northline Road, and various small, pull-off areas are along Rowland Street

Woods Hollow Nature Preserve is a wonderful hidden gem. Although it’s well trafficked, most likely haven’t heard of it.

Once you’re here, you’ll find wide, well-maintained primary trails based on old logging roads and narrower, more technical secondary loops. Out of both possibilities, the latter provides beginners and more advanced trail runners with appropriate ground.

As you go farther, you’ll come across a small, picturesque lake in the heart of the preserve that is a popular summertime fishing spot. Additionally adding to the diverse landscape are a smaller pond, meadows, lupine fields, a sand pit, wetlands, and new- and old-growth pines.

 

Credit: Sarah Quandt
Credit: Sarah Quandt

6. Bog Meadow Brook Nature Trail

2 miles, end to end
Terrain: Flat
Surface: Dirt, old wooden railroad ties, boardwalk
Trailhead Parking: Route 29 (Lake Avenue) to access from the north, or Meadowbrook Road to access from the south

The Bog Meadow Brook Nature Trail is a straightforward, two-mile route that runs along an abandoned railroad line. Given its linear design and long line of sight, the trail is easy to follow and offers many opportunities to take in the natural surroundings and let your mind wander.

The route includes just one intersection, a clearly labeled spur that climbs 0.2 miles steeply up to an adjacent residential neighborhood. As the trail traverses three distinct wetland systems, there’s much to observe, including an abundance of wild and plant life. To do so, various benches, interpretive signage, and handful of viewing platforms let you sit back and watch.


Running the Wapack Trail

Named for the mountains marking the beginning and end—Mount Watatic in Ashburnham, Massachusetts, and North Pack Monadnock in Greenfield, New Hampshire—the 21.5-mile Wapack Trail opened in 1923, making it one of the United States’ oldest interstate trails. Crossing both public and private lands, the Wapack of today is virtually unchanged, except for some re-routing to adapt to changing conditions.

Whether you’re looking to attempt the entire trail in a day or run it in sections, the Wapack has something for everyone. At the same time, it goes through the traditional New England landscape, cresting rocky ridges and descending past dark forests. If, however, you just want to sample the choicest parts, here are some of the Wapack’s must-do runs.

The summit of Pack Monadnock. | Credit: Tim Peck
The summit of Pack Monadnock. | Credit: Tim Peck

Pack Monadnock

Miller State Park, located off Route 101 in Peterborough, New Hampshire, is home to Pack Monadnock (or, simply, “Pack”), which is one of my favorite portions along the Wapack. In fact, you can tell how great this run is because, despite its many negatives, I find myself there on a weekly, sometimes daily, basis. Honestly, this run is so good I routinely have to force myself to go other places at lunch.

It may be a paradox, but the bad thing about this trail is that it’s so great. It has interesting terrain, it’s short enough that it attracts people of all fitness levels, it’s steep but not so much that it can’t be run, and it offers amazing views.

However, because it’s such a great trail, it’s also quite popular, which means it also has a parking fee, a heavily traveled road, and a bunch of buildings on it. Pack’s positives far outweigh its negatives, though. For example, the bathrooms at both ends can be a welcome sight, and the running water at the summit means there’s no need to carry bottles or hydration bladders.

Mount Monadnock from Pack. | Credit: Tim Peck
Mount Monadnock from Pack. | Credit: Tim Peck

Running Pack Monadnock

Leaving the Miller State Park parking lot, the Wapack Trail climbs 1.3 miles while gaining a little under 1,000 feet to the 2,290-foot summit of Pack Monadnock. Feeling winded? Don’t let the steep and challenging nature of the trail scare you off. The first quarter-mile is the hardest. After that, the trail flattens out and becomes less technical, at least by New England standards. If the initial climb hasn’t left you too blurry eyed, look out when the forest opens up and take in the awesome view of Temple Mountain and Mount Monadnock as you cross the breaks.

While not technically on the Wapack Trail, a few variations let you add mileage, increase difficulty, and take in more stunning views. The most natural thing to do is create a loop by descending the Marion Davis Trail from Pack Monadnock’s summit. Roughly the same length as the Wapack Trail, the Marion Davis Trail is a little less steep and technical, making it a much easier descent on tired legs.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Add in North Pack

There are plenty of occasions when I want to run Pack Monadnock but need or want to run farther than three miles. In these situations, traveling over to the summit of 2,276-foot North Pack Monadnock (or just “North Pack”) is the perfect solution.

When I stand on Pack’s summit, North Pack looks only minutes away, but in reality, it’s a fun two-mile run across a wooded ridge. Not very technical, and with the exception of a few steep parts at the beginning and end, this section is perfect for picking up the pace, at least if you have the legs to do it after ascending Pack. In the fall, leave the energy bars at home, as wild blueberry bushes are abundant around the summit.

Looking to add even more challenges or cover different terrain? Divert from the Wapack to the Cliff Trail to add an extra half-mile as well as some trickier conditions on your way to North Pack’s summit, and then, on the way down, follow the Wapack Trail back to Pack (and, eventually, to your car).

Pack from North Pack. | Credit: Tim Peck
Pack from North Pack. | Credit: Tim Peck

Mount Watatic

Marking the trail’s southern terminus is 1,832-foot high Mount Watatic. Here, the Wapack Trail leaves from a well-marked parking lot off Route 119 in Ashburnham, Massachusetts, and on busy weekends, you’re likely to see cars lining the road, as the lot reaches capacity quickly.

Mountain runners will love running the Wapack Trail on Mount Watatic, as it packs plenty of vertical, crosses diverse, demanding terrain, and features a bald summit with incredible views of Mount Wachusett. On clear days, even the Boston skyline is visible! What’s truly impressive is that it does this all in just a little over a mile.

Looking for an additional challenge? Just do what the runners of the Wapack and Back (the double-length trail race along the Wapack) do when they reach Watatic’s parking lot in order to hit the 50-mile mark—run up it, over it, and back a second time.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Go Big on New Hampshire’s Small Mountains

It’s believed that the Native Americans named these mountains, and that “Pack” means little. While they may be small in stature compared to some of New Hampshire’s larger mountains, the Wapack is capable of delivering big days. For those looking for a full-sized outing, running the Wapack from beginning to end is a worthy challenge.

But, don’t make the same mistake I did: Take the trail seriously. Running the Wapack is no joke, with technical terrain and fickle New England weather—wet and slippery in the spring, hot and humid in the summer, leaves covering obstacles in the fall, and snow and ice in winter—thrown in. And, it’s not just the nature of the trails and the weather that make this climb difficult. Additionally, the route ascends approximately 4,600 feet over its 21.5 miles, and with numerous short and steep up-and-downs, its relentless nature can exhaust even the heartiest trail runner.

Before You Go

While signing up for the Wapack and Back race is one approach, running the Wapack Trail self-supported is a fairly easy undertaking. First, the Wapack is very well marked, with yellow blazes and cairns on the ridges; in most instances, just a quick look around will reveal one. Secondly, the trail passes plenty of places to stash extra food and water. Or, because of some sections’ easier nature, you can have people of all skill and fitness levels meet you along the way with something to eat or drink or maybe even give you that much-needed pep talk.

With the exception of going through the whole thing, I have only highlighted runs at this awesome trail’s beginning and end, and there are so many other good routes in between. Get out to explore this historic trail, find your new favorite run, and maybe even challenge yourself to do it all, whether in sections or all at once.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck