What is a Lumen? Shining a Light on Headlamps

Choosing the right headlamp can be daunting. From a wall full of lights that all look similar, covered in numbers that mean next to nothing, how do you pick the right one? To begin, understanding the lumen is the first step toward getting what you need. But, there’s more to know if you want to have the perfect headlamp for your next adventure.

So…what is it?

A lumen is the technical measurement of the amount of light emitted in all directions by a light source. More simply, a lumens rating indicates how bright a headlamp will shine with a fully charged battery. The more lumens a light has, the brighter it is.

Headlamps and other lights run the gamut of brightness. You’ll find anything from the 30-lumen, kid-friendly Black Diamond Wiz to the ultra-powerful, 750-lumen Petzl NAO+. The great thing about these headlamps is, they all have enough lumens for general use. Even those with the lowest lumen count provide enough illumination for an evening stroll around the campsite or a storm-bound day spent in the tent reading.

EMS - BIG SUR -1934-Camping

How many lumens do I need?

But, for other activities, you might need more lumens. So, how many should you get? The answer to that question is activity dependent. For movement-based activities, like night hiking or backpacking, a headlamp with a minimum of 150 to 200 lumens is best. There are exceptions, of course, like hiking the Presidential Range under a supermoon.

For faster-paced activities when you need to see farther ahead so you don’t trip (think nighttime trail-running), a light with more than 250 lumens is ideal. And, for activities like alpine climbing and mountaineering, when you might need a really bright light to briefly scope the next pitch or skirt some sketchy terrain, a lamp with a super-bright option (e.g., more than 350 lumens) will be really useful.

Most major manufacturers list a headlamp’s lumens on its package. It’s worth noting, however, that the majority will only be able to reach that number with fully charged batteries. More so, the higher power at which you operate your headlamp, the more battery power it consumes. Thus, it may make more sense to use a lower brightness to conserve battery life, rather than operate at the full 300 lumens.

Does the ability to adjust brightness interest you? To begin, make sure to check out the lights in Petzl’s Active series, like the Petzl Actik Core. A few Black Diamond models fall into this group, including the Icon and ReVolt.

EMS-Winter-Camp-Kitchen-4122

So, lumen count is the only thing that matters. Right?

All that said, lumen count isn’t the be-all, end-all. It’s also important to consider how the headlamp directs the lumens. Generally referred to as the headlamp’s “beam,” the focusing of the lumens—from pinpoint to diffuse—greatly influences the activities for which the headlamp is ideal.

Types of Beams

A good example of a “general use” model is the 300-lumen Petzl Actik, which lets you toggle between wide and regular beams. Toggling makes the Actik ideal for use around the campsite, where the regular beam is perfect for precision tasks like cooking. The wide beam, meanwhile, is key for navigating around a site without blinding your fellow campers.

Alternately, a headlamp like the 300-lumen Black Diamond Spot has a more focused beam. Thus, it’s ideal for people doing precision work in the dark. Threading rappel anchors after being benighted, checking a climbing partner’s knot before an alpine start, and searching your pack for a midnight snack are all occasions where you benefit from a focused beam.

Some headlamps, such as the Black Diamond Sprinter—built for runners—are engineered to excel at one specific task. The Sprinter uses neither a wide, diffused light nor a concentrated proximity light. Rather, it produces a strong oval beam that is bright enough to illuminate potential hazards on the road or the trail, and shines far enough ahead so that you can anticipate upcoming terrain.

Reactive Lighting

A clear sign of just how far headlamps have advanced in recent years is Petzl’s reactive light technology. These advanced headlamps, like the Petzl Reactik, use a sensor to analyze the amount of ambient light in your environment, and adjust the brightness accordingly. This feature is particularly useful: It ensures you’re receiving just the right amount of light, it uses the headlamp’s battery as efficiently as possible, and it reduces any fiddling with buttons or dials. You can even control the Reactik’s settings via an app to prioritize everything from battery power to brightness.

Courtesy: Black Diamond
Courtesy: Black Diamond

Out Like a Light

The best thing about buying a headlamp at EMS is that there are no bad choices. Almost every model found on our shelves will provide enough lumens for whatever task you ask of it. And, for those looking for a headlamp to perform in a specific instance, manufacturers are rising to the occasion to fill those niches.


Rumney's Multi-Pitch Moderate Rock Climbs

Rumney has a well-deserved reputation as the best sport crag in the Northeast, thanks to its high-quality, single-pitch, bolted climbs at almost every grade. But, did you know that Rumney is also home to a handful of fun, moderate, multi-pitch sport climbs? Here’s a best-of list for almost every grade, along with tips for honing your multi-pitch skills.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Jimmy Cliff: Clip a Dee Doo Dah, 5.3

Don’t discount this remarkable route because of its modest grade. Clip a Dee Doo Dah delivers two pitches of fun slab climbing on surprisingly sticky stone leading to a cliff top with a breathtaking view of the Baker River. This route is so good, you’ll want to bring your approach shoes, so you can make quick time on the trail back to the base of the route and do it again!

Clip a Dee Doo Dah is well protected and a fantastic climb for newer leaders. With a two-bolt anchor and decent ledge atop the first pitch, it is also a great place for any climber to practice multi-pitch rope management. In particular, carefully consider where you build your master point and put your belay. Putting it too low may lead to exhausted elbows and a messy rope stack as you try to keep up with your partner charging up the route.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Jimmy Cliff: Lady and the Tramp, 5.4

Immediately to the climber’s right of Clip a Dee Doo Dah is Lady and the Tramp. It features the same stellar rock found on its popular neighbor, but it’s a little bit steeper and has a few bulges, with the most notable one being directly above the belay at the top of pitch one. It, too, is an excellent route for leaders new to multi-pitch climbing.

In terms of skill building, the route presents a great opportunity for recognizing the dangers of falling directly onto the belay. Particularly, watch out for the crux on the second pitch, located just above the first anchor and initially unprotected. Although a fall is unlikely, the consequences are significant. As such, get in the habit of clipping one of the anchor bolts before leaving the belay.

Speaking of belays, Clip a Dee Doo Dah and Lady and the Tramp share an anchor atop the second pitch. So, in case it’s occupied, bring a cordelette, so you can build your anchor on one of the many nearby trees. Bonus points for safely extending the anchor, so you can watch your second climb!

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Model Citizen, 5.6

Model Citizen is a great introduction to Rumney’s more vertical multi-pitch climbing. Featuring huge holds and interesting movement, the first pitch leads to a two-bolt anchor on a modestly sized belay ledge. More of the same type of climbing follows on pitch two. In fact, if you have a 70-meter rope, the two pitches can be combined into one monster-long pitch, albeit with the leader only being lowered to the anchor on the top of the first pitch.

A key for this route—and the others that follow—is that the top of the final pitch is not intended to be a belay station. Rather, the leader should build an anchor, clip the rope into it just like on a regular single-pitch sport climb, and then get lowered back to the first-pitch anchor. The second can then clean the route and anchor, before being lowered back to the first-pitch anchor. From there, the parties can do a single-rope rappel to the ground. Have questions about the best way to rappel? Check out tip 2 and the associated video in this goEast article.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Crowd Pleaser, 5.7

Another fantastic multi-pitch route, Crowd Pleaser begins a few feet to the right of Model Citizen in a left-facing corner. After an awkward first move or two, the route continues on good holds to an initial two-bolt anchor, for those wanting to top-rope the first pitch. Assuming you’re doing both, keep climbing just a little bit higher to the top of the first pitch. Here, there’s another two-bolt anchor with a nice ledge to belay from. The second pitch begins as low-angled slab before turning into fun, exposed climbing on the arete.

Pigtails, otherwise known as ramsheads, have been a popular option for equipping lower-offs in Europe for years. Inexpensive, robust, and easy to use, they are becoming a more common sight at Rumney, thanks to a grant from the American Alpine Club and the Access Fund. And, unlike other top anchors, they are certified and tested for use as a lower-off—a pigtail is rated to 18kN. Plus, they have no moving parts to wear out or rust.

Want to learn more about using the pigtails found at Rumney? Check out this fantastic video the Rumney Climbers Association published.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Tipping Point, 5.8

The hardest move on the first pitch of this juggy gem of a route might be the first one. So, consider having your belayer spot you until you make your first clip, or you could face a long tumble down the hill. Tipping Point’s first pitch is filled with dreamy climbing, once you unlock the hidden holds, and it ends at a huge belay ledge. Build an anchor, bring up your second, and then continue up. The crux comes at the top of the second pitch, where the slab turns vertical. Although it can feel challenging compared to the rest of the route, the holds are all there, the climbing is fun, and the position is fantastic.

The anchor on the first pitch is the perfect place to practice using the quad anchor. The quad is our go-to anchor on two-bolt anchors, and if you’re unfamiliar with it, check out this excellent video from the AMGA showing you how to use it.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Charity Toad, 5.9

If you’re looking to beat the crowds on Model Citizen, Crowd Pleaser, and Tipping Point, check out Charity Toad. This three-pitch climb is the hardest of the Main Cliff Right’s multi-pitch routes, connecting Charity Case with the final pitch of White Toad via a short traversing pitch. White Toad’s final pitch is airy and very exposed—and definitely worth checking out.

Since you can access several climbs from the top of the first pitch, and the route’s second-pitch traverse crosses at least one more, Charity Toad’s first-pitch belay anchor is a great place to sharpen your route-finding skills. In addition to reading the guidebook, consider taking a screenshot of the route description and map with your smartphone. That way, you’ll have all the beta with you while you’re climbing the route. Of course, if you want to minimize any potential route-finding confusion, just climb the first two pitches of White Toad instead. But, since White Toad’s first pitch only goes on gear, you’ll have to bring your trad rack.

Have you climbed any of aforementioned routes? Tell us which one is your favorite in the comments.


At-Home Training for Climbers

While we’re always psyched on climbing, the sad reality is you don’t always have enough time to visit the crag, boulders, or even the gym—especially during the work week. Lucky for us, there are numerous ways to stay strong and build climbing fitness without leaving the house. Try some of our basement beta, and you’ll realize that training in the home gym during the work week can translate to sending on the weekend.

Courtesy: Beastmaker
Courtesy: Beastmaker

Hangboard

Hangboards are one of the most popular at-home training aids. While that might be because they’re small, easy to mount, and inexpensive, these devices are also very effective. Climbers literally hang from a variety of different-sized pockets and holds to build finger strength. As a side note, this is why hangboards are also sometimes called fingerboards.

Pull-Up Bar

Although less climbing-specific, a pull-up bar suits anyone who wants to take a break from their fingerboard, rest sore fingers, or simply work larger muscles. In fact, you can use it in all manners to build climbing strength. To start, the classic pull-up is a great exercise for increasing pulling power. Then, Frenchies—pausing to lock off at certain angles through the movement of a pull-up—are a fantastic method for building endurance and simulating the pause climbers take when clipping a bolt or placing gear. Allez!

Courtesy: Sestogrado
Courtesy: Sestogrado

Rock Rings

No room for a hangboard? Don’t have a wall you’re comfortable drilling into? Live a life on the go? If you answered yes to any of these questions, rock rings may be the best solution. Used as a pair, these individually molded grips are suspended using a cord that can be hung from any number of anchors. Think about a basement beam, a backyard tree, or even a swing set at the local park. Although lacking the diversity of a hangboard, rock rings let you move freely. In turn, the motion places less strain on your joints compared to doing pull-ups or Frenchies, which involve a fixed position that may be hard on the elbows.

Courtesy: Reading Climbing Centre
Courtesy: Reading Climbing Centre

Campus Board

If you have a bit more room available, consider a campus board. Wolfgang Güllich devised its simple, utilitarian, and effective design to train for sending the world’s first 9A, Action Directe. On a series evenly spaced rungs on a slightly overhanging wall, climbers move up and down without using their feet to primarily build power. Additionally, you can increase finger and core strength and improve accuracy when moving between holds. Because of the physical demands, it’s not recommended for new or young climbers.

Crack Machine

Climbers looking to crush cracks can build a crack machine to practice technique and gain strength. Simple and easy to construct, crack machines feature two stiff wooden boards mounted to resemble a crack. And, while advanced constructors will create adjustable machines, most basement builders will find it easier to create multiple cracks in the sizes they want to train—primarily finger and hand. The best part is, a little goes a long way, and you can climb both up and down when training.

Home Wall

For those with room to spare, a home wall is the way to go. From mild to wild, a home wall can range from a simple mounted piece of plywood to a full build rivaling the rock gym. Whether it’s freestanding or mounted to the wall, the most important components are the holds. Consider a wide variety of shapes and sizes for increased diversity and fun in setting. Overall, the best home walls tend to be the most frequently used ones and ultimately do their job—getting you strong for climbing.

Courtesy: Moon Climbing
Courtesy: Moon Climbing

Moon Board

For pro climbers and those truly dedicated to getting strong, try a Moon Board. Back in the ‘80s, legendary U.K. climber Ben Moon devised the first Moon Board in his basement in Sheffield, England, and by the 2000s, the trend had caught on. Compact and simple in design, Moon Boards have a uniform size and configuration: 8.06 feet wide, 10.40 feet high, and positioned at a 40-degree angle. The holds are placed in fixed locations, creating a wall that is the same, no matter where it’s located. Because of the universal layout, it’s possible to project the same route as your buddy across the country, or your favorite pro climber.

As such, serious climbers can find thousands of established problems posted on moonboard.com and the MoonBoard App. Even better, with the addition of an LED system, you can download and illuminate the problems to make route finding easier.

Books

Strong fingers and abs only get you so far, especially if your training plan is haphazard, your mental game is lacking, or your technical skills are weak. If any of that rings a bell, check out one of these books for training your brain.

  • If you have the hangboard or home wall but are unsure of how to best use them, The Self-Coached Climber offers excellent advice for developing your own training plan. And, for something even more programmed, check out the training plans available from Uphill Athlete and the Mountain Tactical Institute.
  • For climbers truly looking to train their mind, The Rock Warrior’s Way is an insightful read about mental training.
  • The Mountain Guide Manual: The Comprehensive Reference—From Belaying to Rope Systems and Self-Rescue is an incredible technical skills guide that will greatly improve your climbing systems’ efficiency. Practice them at home, and you’ll find that you’ll have a lot more time to spend sending at the crag next weekend.

Have a training technique we didn’t mention? If so, tell us about it in the comments.


Video: Rope-Soloing El Cap in 24 Hours

Rope-soloing is one of the most misunderstood climbing disciplines out there, but it might also be one of the most exhausting. Doing 3000 feet of it in 24 hours on one of the world’s more famous big walls? That’s an accomplishment worthy of a video.


The Best Beers After Every Adventure

There are a lot of things to love about being outdoors in the summer. Days are longer, so you have extra time for adventuring. Temperatures are warmer, so you don’t have to worry about how many layers to wear—and how many extra ones to pack. And, even though the après scene is strong in the realm of winter sports, few things are more satisfying than an ice-cold beer at the end of a hot summer day spent in the wild. So, to make this your most refreshing summer yet, begin with these beer and activity recommendations. Just remember to drink and play outdoors responsibly, please. Cheers!

XXX-North-Conway_Bar

Beers for Backpacking

Whether you’re the type to save a little space for a can or three in your pack or someone who leaves a six-pack in a cooler in your car, there’s no denying that a strong brew and backpacking go together like peanut butter and Nutella. Pitch-A-Tent Double IPA from Hobbs Tavern & Brewing Co. (8% ABV; 76 IBU) is the perfect way to wind down from a high-mileage day while you wait for your freeze-dried meal to “cook.” And, it’s still just as good if you wait to imbibe until you’re back in the parking lot—or your backyard.

Beers for Mountain Biking

If you’re anything like my husband and his friends, you throw back a beer at the end of a hard ride, because you totally crushed it, bro. If you’re like me, you probably have a few new bruises, so you crack open a cold one in an effort to dull the pain that both your body and ego are suffering. Either way, New Belgium’s Fat Tire Belgian Style Ale (5.2% ABV; 22 IBU) is an ideal choice for your post-ride recovery beverage. As an added bonus, New Belgium is a member of 1% For the Planet, so each Fat Tire you drink also helps support amazing things like bicycle advocacy, clean water, and reforestation.

Beers for Climbing

Nothing soothes tender tips better than an ice-cold beer after a day of cragging. As soon as your rack is stowed away, your rope is coiled, and you’ve traded in your approach shoes for your flippy-floppies, it’s time to treat yourself to a parking lot Monkey Fist from Shipyard Brewing (6% ABV; 50 IBU). This delicious West Coast-style IPA is named after a knot (for sailors, but still), and according to Shipyard, it “starts smooth and finishes with a…subtle bitterness,” which is likely also how your day of climbing progressed. I dare you to find a more appropriate brew to wrap up a day on the rock.

Beers for Trail Running

Hitting the trail for a tough sweat session is one of those things I love as an afterthought but really only tolerate as it’s happening. The post-run beer, however, is not only something I love in the moment, but it’s also often what motivates me to even put those miles under my feet in the first place. And, in this instance, Rock Art Brewery’s Ridge Runner (7.2% ABV; 23 IBU) always hits the spot. Ambiguously classified as a “Bold Vermont Ale,” these strong suds easily help you forget about those lung-burning climbs, quad-killing descents, and all the roots and rocks you nearly face-planted.

Beers for Hiking

Day-hiking is great, because it’s just backpacking for a few hours instead of a few days and doesn’t involve carrying all that stuff. There’s no denying that a day of hiking deserves a beer, but since it’s not quite as demanding, I like to end my treks with one that’s a little less intense. Trail Hopper from Long Trail Brewing Co. (4.75% ABV; 40 IBU) is a slightly fruity, super-refreshing session IPA—and an excellent way to end a hot summer hike.

Beers for Paddling

All of these summer sports are tiring, but spending a day in a kayak or on a paddleboard has a particular knack for wearing you out. I don’t know if it’s because of all the sun, or if it’s just because I always forget how much of a workout paddling actually is, but whenever I head out, I’m totally beat when I get back on solid ground—and super thirsty. Dogfish Head’s SeaQuench Ale (4.9% ABV; 10 IBU) is a mixed bag of styles (Kolsch, Gose, and Berliner Weiss) with some lime and sea salt thrown in. Men’s Health dubbed it “the world’s most thirst-slaying beer,” and overall, it’s a great complement to your aquatic adventures.

Call It a Day

Some summer days are so nice, you end up enjoying more than one activity. Maybe you hit the trail for an easy run in the morning, and then, go to your favorite lake for an afternoon paddle. Or, maybe you head out for a little alpine endeavor, like Henderson Ridge. Whatever your multi-sport adventure of choice may be, there’s one beer that’s perfect for the end of a day spent outdoors: Call It A Day IPA from Moat Mountain Brewing Company (8% ABV; 75 IBU).

 

Now, you tell us: What’s your favorite beer, and which activity does it pair with best? Let us know in the comments!

 

Credit: Lauren Danilek
Credit: Lauren Danilek

Video: El Cap Speed Record Time Lapse

It feels like there’s a new speed record on The Nose every year, but this video makes the latest one feel different. When Brad Gobright and Jim Reynolds made the send in October 2017, they had one team time-lapsing the whole 2-hour, 19-minute, 44-second endeavor (!!). This unique climbing video will make you want to practice your jumaring.


The Dos and Don'ts of Indoor Rock Climbing

The climbing gym is a magical place, and most outdoor sports don’t have an indoor equivalent. If they do, it doesn’t offer nearly the same level of enjoyment as the real thing (ahem, running and biking). When it comes to climbing, however, even though we will always prefer real rock, the rock gym never feels like less of a compromise. A few things that frequently occur here can make it a less-than-great experience, though. Having a little etiquette will ensure your sessions are fun for you and everyone around. So, what are the dos and don’ts of climbing indoors?

Courtesy: Markus
Courtesy: Markus

DO: Be supportive of other climbers!

While climbing isn’t exactly a “team sport,” it is most definitely a community activity. Just as they do in the wild, climbers indoors rely on each other for a secure belay, a good spot, and words of encouragement. Here, be sure to do that whole “treat others as you wish to be treated” thing. Cheer others on, move a crash pad underneath a fellow boulderer if they’ve misjudged where to put it, and offer up advice when someone asks for it. But…

DON’T: Start handing out unsolicited advice while they’re climbing

This is called “spraying beta,” and nobody likes it. Even if you’ve watched a climber flail on the same section of a route or boulder problem for the last 20 minutes—and you know exactly what they need to do to move past it—unless they ask for your help, keep your mouth shut.

DO: Jump on hard-for-you routes!

A regular gym is where people can try to get better at running or spinning, or make gains in the weight room. But, progress never happens if you stick to the same routine. Similarly, a rock gym is where climbers can go to fine-tune their technique and build strength for scaling harder routes. And, similarly, it will never happen if you climb the same grades each time.

So, yes, jump on that V6 you’ve been eyeing for the past week or two, even if you still sometimes struggle to send V5s or V4s. Or, try out the new 5.11 your favorite setter just put up, even if you had a hard time figuring out the 5.9 they set last month. In order to get better, you have to push yourself out of your comfort zone and try harder things. However…

Courtesy: Aimee Custis
Courtesy: Aimee Custis

DON’T: Hog the wall while you try to figure it out

Unless no one else is there, never take over a particular route or section of the bouldering wall as you try to piece the moves together. In general, repeatedly falling off and jumping back on is a good way to build character. However, doing this without allowing other people to give it a shot earns you a bad reputation.

DO: Look around, mingle, and be social!

Maybe you’ve noticed the same person or group is always there when you are. Or, maybe a particular climber that you just can’t help but watch makes you wonder if they have springs in their bones. In either case, strike up a conversation! You can’t have too many climbing friends, and the rock gym is the perfect place to meet new ones. Just make sure you…

DON’T: Get in the way of other climbers

Nevertheless, people are still primarily at the rock gym to get in a good workout. So, avoid getting so involved in conversation that you fail to notice you’ve parked yourself right in front of a climb someone else is waiting patiently to jump on. When you’re bouldering, keep in mind that the crash pads are there to break a fall—not offer you and your friends a cushy place to sit and debate which bar you should head to when you’re done. And, if you’re walking and talking, be sure to stay aware of your surroundings. Otherwise, you’ll end up walking underneath people who are climbing.

Courtesy: Meraj Chhaya
Courtesy: Meraj Chhaya

DO: Bring your kids to the gym!

The next generation has to start somewhere, and bringing your little ones is as good a place as any. The gym allows you to show your kids the ropes (overly obvious pun intended) in a relatively controlled environment, without the distractions or potential dangers presented by climbing outdoors. Having them at the gym also keeps things entertaining for the rest of us. There’s nothing I love more than watching a 7-year-old make it farther on a new boulder problem than my husband can on their first try.

DON’T: Let them run wild while you climb

There’s nothing worse than a kid running around while you’re belaying or underneath while you’re bouldering. If you’re going to let your kids tag along, they should know proper gym etiquette, too! When you teach them how to tie in, also explain why it’s important to give other belayers some distance and not run around, behind, or in front of them. As they get more comfortable falling or jumping off a boulder problem, make sure they understand that adults also fall and jump. As such, being too close—either underneath or on another problem that crosses paths—is dangerous for both parties.

Courtesy: Aimee Custis
Courtesy: Aimee Custis

DO: Have fun!

The best part of climbing, whether indoors or out, is that it’s fun. On-sighting a new route is always exciting. As well, topping out a gym’s bouldering wall can sometimes be more satisfying than topping out an actual boulder because you know there’s a safe, easy way back down. And, climbing with friends is almost never not a good time.

DON’T: Be that guy or girl

Despite climbing’s inherent fun-ness, there are plenty of ways to ruin it. Don’t be the person who makes a trip to the gym a nightmare by doing these things:

  • Unnecessary screaming, yelling, or grunting. Making noises while you’re climbing happens. When you’re outdoors, the open space makes it more tolerable for those around you. At the gym, however, the confined space turns even the least-offensive grunt into the noise of someone who just popped a shoulder out of place or broke an ankle. Try to keep your noises to a minimum.
  • Bouldering with a harness on. There may be nothing dangerous about this, and it probably won’t affect your own enjoyment. However, it does make you look foolish, and it’s embarrassing for your friends. Take your harness off when you’re done with ropes.
  • Dressing inappropriately. Guys, most rock gyms are climate-controlled places, which means there’s almost never a need to take off your shirt. Ladies, booty shorts with a harness is neither attractive nor comfortable. Keep your rock gym wardrobe simple: a T-shirt or tank top with climbing shorts or leggings. And, unless you’re renting shoes from the gym or have a medical reason to keep them on, take off your socks!
  • Throwing a wobbler when you don’t send. This is especially common amongst boulderers, but it happens on the ropes, too. Either way, it’s not a good look on anybody. Remember that you’re there to get better at the sport, and that you have to fail occasionally in order to do it. Nobody wants to listen to you curse or watch you throw your shoes at the wall. Keep it together, take a few deep breaths, and jump on a route you know you can do to build your confidence back up before returning to your new project.
  • Chalk snafus. Some gyms require chalk balls in an effort to keep their facilities clean. But, if we could all just be a little more mindful, it wouldn’t be an issue. Pay attention when you’re walking around, so you don’t knock over someone’s chalk pot. Don’t scoop out a handful, and then sprinkle half of it on the floor as you rub it into your hands. And, don’t forget to cinch your chalk bag shut when you pack your stuff up.
  • Gym Sprawl. Unless you’re at the gym during a quiet time of day, bring only what you need onto the floor. This usually entails your shoes, chalk, and harness. I know it’s nice to check your phone or grab a sip of water in between routes without having to walk back over to the cubbies or locker room. However, if the gym is busy and everyone has their non-essential stuff at the wall, moving from climb to climb becomes an obstacle course—and not a fun one. Plus, if you leave your stuff in a cubby, your chances of leaving something behind or going home with a broken phone because someone stepped on it are a lot lower.

Did I miss anything? Share your tips for proper rock gym etiquette in the comments!

Courtesy: Aimee Custis
Courtesy: Aimee Custis

Video: First Teaser for The Dawn Wall

In January 2015, the world held its breath as Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgenson worked at the first free ascent of El Capitan’s notoriously difficult Dawn Wall. But for Caldwell, the climb was more than simply a six-year effort. This video is just a taste of what we’ll be looking for in the full film, coming later this year.


5 Hikes That Will (Almost) Make You Forget You Started The Day in New York City

New York City has just about everything. The great outdoors, however? Not so much.

If you’re like me, escaping the concrete jungle and its outer reaches every few weeks is a must. There’s no better way to do that than by lacing up my hiking boots and exploring some new terrain.

In fact, you may be surprised by all the opportunities around the New York metropolitan area. From a “surprise” lake in North Jersey to a killer rock scramble up the New York State Thruway, here are five day hikes to get you out of Manhattan and back into nature.

Credit: Patrick Villanova
Credit: Patrick Villanova

1. Storm King Mountain (Cornwall-On-Hudson, New York)

Never climbed a mountain before? That’s okay. This is the perfect trip to get your hiking legs under you.

Storm King Mountain in Cornwall rises only 1,340 feet above sea level, but packs sweeping views of the Hudson River, Hudson Highlands, and the Catskill Mountains. At 2.5 miles roundtrip and only one hour and 15 minutes from Midtown, it’s a fine alternative to Breakneck Ridge, its overcrowded cousin across the river.

Set out from the parking lot along the northbound lanes of Route 9W, and pick up the orange-blazed trail at the lot’s north end. But, be ready. You’ll be sweating almost immediately as you quickly gain elevation when climbing over the exposed rock.

Follow the orange trail markers to the yellow/blue-blazed trail, which will take you to the summit. Stop and take in the view over lunch before heading back to the parking lot along the white-blazed trail.

If you’re thirsty after conquering Storm King Mountain, be sure to stop off at Industrial Arts Brewing Company, a fantastic brewery housed in a pre-Civil War era warehouse in Garnerville, New York. It’s just a quick 30-minute drive south on Route 9W.

Credit: Patrick Villanova
Credit: Patrick Villanova

2. Bald Mountain (Stony Point, New York)

If you’ve done much hiking in the New York metropolitan area, chances are you’ve spent some time in either Harriman or Bear Mountain State Park. Bald Mountain, located in the latter, is a short but steep hike that leads to a wonderful view of the Hudson River and surrounding landscapes.

At just over three miles roundtrip, this out-and-back hike gains more than 1,100 vertical feet before giving way to a rocky, mostly bald summit that overlooks the iconic Bear Mountain Bridge and surrounding highlands.

Expect about an hour-and-15-minute drive from Midtown Manhattan. Park along Route 9W north across from the Ramapo-Dunderberg and Doodletown Brook trailhead. From the road, follow the blue-blazed Cornell Mine Trail for 1.45 miles—here’s where you’ll be doing most of your climbing—before turning right onto the red/white blazes of the Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail. Then, you’ll need to do just a bit more climbing before hitting your payoff at the top of Bald Mountain. Head back the way you came.

If you’re looking for another post-hike haunt, check out the Peekskill Brewery on the east side of the Hudson River. But, be prepared, as it’s often packed with hikers on weekends.

Credit: Patrick Villanova
Credit: Patrick Villanova

3. Bearfort Ridge to Surprise Lake (West Milford, New Jersey)

Hike to the remote Surprise Lake near the New York/New Jersey border, and enjoy a refreshing swim on a hot summer day, all just an hour from Midtown.

For non-hikers, this will be a challenging but rewarding adventure. At just under six miles, it has a little bit of everything: plenty of up and downs along the Bearfort Ridge, occasional rock scrambling, a rhododendron tunnel, and, of course, Surprise Lake.

Park in one of two small pullouts along Warwick Turnpike (near the intersection with White Road) in West Milford, New Jersey. Then, enter the forest just east of the barely-noticeable concrete bridge. Start on the white-blazed trail, and hike for about three miles, before picking up the yellow-blazed trail. Follow this path to the rhododendron tunnel, located at the 3.3-mile mark right before you reach Surprise Lake.

After a swim and some lunch, head back to the road along the orange-blazed trail. If you’re still sucking wind, don’t worry. The return trip will be far flatter and less challenging than the hike up.

Credit: Jorge Quinteros
Credit: Jorge Quinteros

4. Bonticou Crag (Gardiner, New York)

If a true rock scramble is what you seek, this is the hike you’ll want.

Bonticou Crag in the Mohonk Preserve near New Paltz, New York offers a short yet physical challenge for anyone wanting to use all fours on their next outing. Atop this jagged boulder field is a sunbaked summit–more of a ridgeline, actually–equipped with stunning views of the surrounding Hudson River Valley and the Catskill Mountains.

While you have many route options within the preserve, climbing Bonticou Crag before continuing to Table Rocks makes for a nice six-mile outing.

As a word of caution, this hike is not for small children and non-hikers. You’ll need to use some upper body strength while completing the 20-minute rock scramble, but it’s an exciting challenge to tackle. Also, be prepared to pay a $15 fee per hiker.

Credit: Patrick Villanova
Credit: Patrick Villanova

5. Hunter Mountain (West Kill, New York)

I know what you’re thinking: I’m not driving 2.5 hours to go hiking!

It’s a long ride, yes, but if you’re really in need of a break from the city, Hunter Mountain and the stunning view from its fire tower make for a great experience. Get an early start, because at the end lies one of the Catskills’ best pound-for-pound hikes.

At eight miles roundtrip and with approximately 1,900 feet of elevation gain, Hunter is certainly the most ambitious on this list. It’s one of the Catskills’ only two 4,000-foot mountains, but well worth the effort and time it takes to get there.

Park in the first of two lots near the end of Spruceton Road. Then, ascend the mountain on the blue-blazed horse trail, which passes through a dense and fragrant conifer forest en route to the summit. It’s about 3.1 miles to the top, but once you’re there, you will be greeted by one of the Northeast’s tallest fire towers. While the summit is technically flat and forested, the fire tower offers a 360-degree view of the surrounding mountains. For my money, it’s the Catskills’ best view.

After you’re done taking in the scenery, make your way down by following the yellow blazes, which lead to the red-blazed trail. During your descent, you will pass through more of the lush conifer forest before reaching the Devil’s Acre shelter. Stop there for a quick break, but don’t dilly-dally. Less than a mile from the end of the hike, you’ll have the chance to cool off at Diamond Notch Falls, a pair of 15-foot waterfalls just off the red-blazed trail.

When you reach the end, walk back along Spruceton Road for a few minutes to return to the parking lot. But, before heading back to the New York State Thruway, be sure to stop at the West Kill Brewery, just a mile from the trailhead, to celebrate bagging the Catskills’ second-tallest mountain. You’ve earned it.