4 Tips for Finding Wintertime Solitude in the Adirondacks

Finding peace, solitude, and quiet in our day-to-day lives gets harder every day. Sometimes I head into the woods looking for a more social natural experience. I like to see other people on the trail or at a campground. It makes me feel even more comfortable if I am alone, or it is getting dark. In some circumstances, I’m expecting to see other friendly dogs for my dog to meet, other hikers to chat with on the summit, and the trail to be worn from other snowshoers so my walk will be a bit easier.

But other times, I am seeking solitude. I want to experience the quiet, untrammeled parts of wilderness. I want to experience the natural world as many people have before me, for hundreds of years. I want to hear birds, and water rushing. I want to have a chance to see wildlife. I want to find an overlook to enjoy the view in seclusion where I can fully let my body relax, look over valleys, rivers and marvel at nature’s wonders.

The reality is that we must share our wildlands; They belong to all of us. However, there are a few things you can do to find a little more solitude if that is the experience you’re seeking when planning your next outing in the Adirondacks this winter.

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Venture into the wilderness outside the High Peaks.

The High Peaks Wilderness area gets a lot of attention for being home to the tallest peaks in the Park. But there are many other Wilderness areas that offer unique outdoor recreation opportunities. There are many mountains, lakes, rivers, and ponds that have trails that connect and offer opportunities to explore the Adirondacks. 

Avoid using apps to find your hikes.

These apps can be helpful, but especially in the Adirondacks, there are so many trails that are not listed on them. You can find more reliable and comprehensive information (and quieter places to visit!) listed by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), town websites, regional land trusts, or the Champlain Area Trails. If there is a trail listed on apps or on a review site with many recent reviews, consider picking another location.  

Explore summer destinations.

Snowshoe/ski into popular paddling areas and primitive campgrounds that would be otherwise busy in warmer seasons. Make sure to call the land manager (many times the DEC) beforehand for permission to use the closed seasonal roads first.  

Start from a quieter town.

Whether you’re a local or coming from far away, consider planning your outing in a town that is a bit sleepier during the winter season. You will be much more likely to step out of your car and into solitude. Plan ahead if you’re hoping to make it an overnight trip, as some businesses may be shut down for the season. This may mean bringing your own provisions and cooking a cozy meal in your AirBnB. For locals it may mean bringing dry clothes and a thermos of something hot to keep in your car for a comfortable ride home. 

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It’s our responsibility when we get to any natural place, to leave it better than we find it. Even if we are the only person that visits a place, the next person will feel like they have just discovered a place for the first time too. That also means thinking about how you share your experience on social media after your trip.  

It’s also worth mentioning, that if you’re going to take the responsibility of venturing into more remote, less populated destinations, you should especially be prepared for the conditions for the outing. Understanding the safety implications of where you are going, what you’re doing, and if there is cell service where you are. Even if you’re only planning to be out for a day, have enough gear to survive overnight in case you get stranded. 

At the end of the day, no matter what, even if you’re sharing your experience with many other people, a day spent in the Adirondacks is a good day. However, there are many places in the Adirondacks where you can go and have a quiet winter day. There is a certain magic when we have a moment in winter solitude to experience the gifts of Mother Nature and realize why it is all worth protecting for everyone. 

How do you find solitude, and when do you enjoy a more social nature experience?


Video: Lure of the North

In the remote wilderness of Ontario, Canada, two travellers endure the repetitive mental hardship of cold winter tripping. This short film captures the experiences and emotions of their expedition. It’s tough. It’s tiring. It’s lonesome. Yet it’s a beautiful and meditative love affair as you persevere one snowshoe step at a time.


A State-by-State Guide to Giving Tuesday in New England

Black Friday, Small Business Saturday, Cyber Monday—so much of our time (and money) around Thanksgiving is spent trying to find the perfect gifts for friends and families that it’s easy to lose sight of the organizations working to make our communities better. In recent years, the idea of Giving Tuesday has become popular, reminding us to support the organizations protecting our crags, keeping our waters clean, advocating for open spaces, and exposing the next generation of outdoor lovers to our favorite sports. If you’re in the giving mood, here are some New England outdoor non-profits that could use your support.

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Rhode Island

It makes sense that the state nicknamed the Ocean State is home to awesome water-based organizations. One of the most notable is Save the Bay. Turning 50 years old in 2020, Save the Bay is a 20,000-member-strong group dedicated to protecting one of Rhode Island’s most valuable natural resources, recognizable landmarks, and playgrounds for paddlers and surfers: Narragansett Bay.

Another ocean-inspired Rhode Island organization that will be amped if you hang ten (or more) dollars on them this holiday season is Spread the Swell, which is working to share the stoke by offering free, non-profit surf camps to underprivileged Rhode Island kids.

While the Ocean State is best known for its surf, it’s also home to some of the best bouldering in New England. Spot the Southeast New England Climbers Coalition a donation and assist them in their work to help protect and establish access to crags, along with maintaining popular destinations like Lincoln Woods.

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Massachusetts 

The Pan-Mass Challenge is synonymous with summer in the Bay State, as cyclists push their limits on a variety of rides, raising money for a cause everyone is on board with: defeating cancer. Go the extra mile this year by donating, fundraising, or committing to volunteer at the August event.

Helping keep cyclists safe as they train to tackle the Pan-Mass Challenge’s 187 miles and 2,500 feet of climbing is the Massachusetts Bicycle Coalition (MassBike). Help MassBike keep the wheels in motion toward creating a more bicycle-friendly state with a donation or by volunteering your time.

Investing in the sports we love is about more than merely maintenance and access. Chill Boston introduces underserved youth in the Greater Boston Area to board sports such as snowboarding, SUPing, and surfing. Drop in and hook them up with a donation to keep our board-based sports healthy and diverse, while also teaching young people valuable life skills.

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Connecticut

Connecticut is home to outdoor activities as diverse as its landscape, ranging from hiking to rock climbing to cycling. A donation to the Connecticut Forest & Park Association (CFPA) can put a spring in the step of the Nutmeg State’s hikers. The organization is committed to connecting people to the land to protect Connecticut’s forests, parks, walking trails, and open spaces for future generations.

Enthusiasts of Connecticut’s high and wild places will want to tick a donation to the Ragged Mountain Foundation (RMF) off their list. The RMF currently owns 56 acres of land in Southington, Connecticut—including Ragged Mountain—and is focused on stewardship, protection, and public access to the state’s cliffs and crags.

The Connecticut Cycling Advancement Program (CCAP) provides the state’s youth with an organized state-wide cycling league, allowing them to grow within the sport and develop values and skills that transfer to other parts of their life. Ride into the holidays feeling good with a donation to this great group.

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Vermont

Locally grown food, amazing craft beer, and outstanding outdoor experiences are commonly associated with Vermont. One of the orgs aiding Vermont in sustaining this reputation is CRAG Vermont, which is dedicated to preserving access to and maintaining the state’s climbing resources, along with giving hungry and thirsty climbers a place to play. Help CRAG Vermont over the crux with a donation this year.

Vermont is a destination for mountain bikers from across the US and Canada. The Vermont Mountain Bike Association (VMBA) consists of 26 unified chapters dedicated to advocating, educating, and promoting mountain biking in the Green Mountain State. Your donation will facilitate the trails remaining fast, flowy, and flush.

If you think of Vermont’s mountains as more white than green, check out the Vermont Backcountry Alliance (VTBC) this Giving Tuesday. Cutting a check to the VTBC helps keep the state’s legendary tree skiing properly maintained, while also protecting and advancing access for human-powered skiing.

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New Hampshire 

It’s no surprise that the Granite State is a mecca for New England climbers. Friends of the Ledges is an org focusing on stewardship and access to the climbing found in the eastern White Mountains of New Hampshire and Maine. Keep this awesome group sending in the future—they secured nine-acres of land critical for access to Cathedral Ledge and Whitehorse Ledge in 2019—with a donation this year.

Accidents happen in the mountains to even the most experienced hikers, climbers, and skiers. If you happen to have a mishap in the White Mountains, you’ll be glad you came to the aid of Androscoggin Valley Search and Rescue (AVSAR) with a donation this year, as they assist various agencies with search and rescues in the region.

If you pedal your bike in central or southern New Hampshire, you’ve likely spent time on the techy trails built and maintained by the Friends of Massabesic Bicycling Association (FOMBA). A donation to this awesome org helps keep their relationship with Manchester Water Works rolling, and access to these terrific trails open.

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Maine 

Maine is home to the only national park in New England: Acadia. The first U.S. national park originally created by private land donations, you can join in the park’s philanthropic tradition by becoming a member, making a donation, or volunteering with Friends of Acadia—a group helping to preserve, protect, and promote the region’s only national park.

Another incredible private land donation (and the Northeast’s best hope for a second national park) is the 80,000+ acres donated by the co-founder of Burt’s Bees known as Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument. While you probably can’t match enormous donations such as this, you can help preserve and protect this parcel by joining or donating to the Friends of Katahdin Woods and Waters, taking part in the tradition of selflessness and generosity that birthed this area’s creation

If you’ve ever climbed Mount Katahdin and marveled at the wildness of Baxter State Park, you owe a debt of gratitude to Maine’s 53rd governor, Percival Baxter, who gave the park to the people of Maine with the mandate that it remain forever wild. Get in the giving spirit of the former governor with a gift to the Friends of Baxter State Park, who are working to preserve, support, and enhance the wilderness character of the park.

Do you know of another nonprofit that could use some support this year? If so, leave it in the comments so our readers can check it out.


How to Stay Warm While Sleeping Outside

Growing up, I had the fortune of having parents that took me camping. I had a thin foam sleeping pad and a 50-degree kids sleeping bag. I never slept well and I always froze at night. I thought that’s what camping was!

Turns out, I was wrong. Lucky for me, as I’ve gotten older and more experienced I’ve learned a lot about staying warm and comfortable while sleeping outside. For the past three years I’ve spent more than 100 nights a year sleeping under the stars. I get really cold really easily and I take my sleep seriously—I want to be comfy out there! Following these tips can go a long way toward keeping you warm and comfortable, and getting a good night sleep.

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The Basics

Step one: Get yourself a weather-appropriate sleeping bag. Duh. But something many people don’t think about is that the ground conducts tons of heat away from your body. The barrier you put between you and the cold earth plays a big role in how warm you’ll be. A foam pad is a good start. If you sleep cold or the temps are low, making the step up to an inflatable and even an insulated sleeping pad makes a huge difference. Pay close attention to the pad’s R-valueto know exactly how warm and insulating it will be. Not all pads are created equal. And don’t forget that sleeping pad insulation is additive, meaning on real cold nights or if you’re sleeping on the snow, stacking a foam sleeping pad and an inflatable pad increases the insulation even more.

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Debunk the Myths

Some people will tell you that you should sleep with hardly any clothes on, or even naked, to get the most out of your sleeping bag and that this will keep you warmer in the end. Those people have never slept outside, in the cold, naked in their sleeping bags.

Their theory isn’t totally baseless, though. The idea is that by wearing extra layers inside your sleeping bag, you crush the loft of your bag and thus take away from its insulating capabilities. It may seem like the best thing to do on a cold night would be to bundle up in all your layers then squeeze yourself into your sleeping bag, but if you’re wearing too much you can actually compromise the effectiveness of your sleeping bag’s insulation (not to mention your comfort). You can definitely wear some of those layers to bed (there’s no need to get in naked), but don’t wear so many that you feel your sleeping bag squeezing back in on you—Leave enough room for the down to expand to its full loft.

Keep these other tips in mind before heading to bed:

  • Keep a pair of “sacred socks” in your sleeping bag so you always have a warm and dry pair for sleeping. Never get in your sleeping bag with wet or cold socks.
  • Wear a hat. It’s not a myth that you lose a lot of heat through your head! Consider wearing a hood too, if necessary.
  • Make sure all your layers are dry. Dry clothes equal warm clothes.
  • If you’re winter camping or in really low temps, consider puffy booties, pants, and/or a jacket to sleep in. These are like mini sleeping bags for all your appendages and can work wonders! They’re also great pillows if you don’t sleep in them.
  • If you’re sleeping bag is too big for you and has extra space that you aren’t filling with your body, consider stuffing extra layers in those areas so your body can heat the air around you to keep you warm rather than losing all that warmth to dead space in your bag. This is especially helpful for shorter folks in longer bags. Keep those toes warm!

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Feed the Fire

Staying warm is all about keeping your internal furnace burning throughout the night. We’ve talked about insulating that furnace and now we’re going to talk about fueling it!

Eat a snack

Having some calories in your system right before bed gives your body fuel to burn and helps keep you toasty. If I’m not in bear country I like to keep a Snickers bar with me while I sleep. This gives me quick burning sugar for immediate warmth and the protein in the peanuts keep the burn going a while longer.

Drink something warm

The best way to get warm is to start warm. A hot drink helps warm you up from the inside. My favorite: Brew peppermint tea and put cocoa mix in it. If I want extra calories I’ll put in a scoop of butter or some light olive oil. Have you ever tried hot cocoa with peanut butter mixed in? It’s like drinking a Reese’s and adds some bulk to keep your furnace burning.

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Use a hot water bottle

Fill a small water bottle like a 16oz Nalgene with near-boiling water, put it at the foot of your bag and relish in your new personal sauna. If you’re super cold, hold the bottle between your thighs, right on your femoral arteries—Warming that blood as it circulates will keep the rest of your body warm.

Take a lap

My dad always said I had a heater in my tennis shoes and would send me on a little run if I complained of the cold. I might not like to admit it, but he was right. A brisk walk before bed, a set of jumping jacks, a quick dance party, or shadow boxing routine—whatever you need to do to get the blood pumping to keep you warm right before you tuck in for the night—can go al long way. Again, the easiest way to get warm in your sleeping bag is to already be warm when you get in it, but if you’re already in your bag you can simulate this by contracting all your muscles as hard as you can and then releasing them several times.

Bonus points: Go pee!

Seriously. I know it’s cold and dark out there. But go do it. Your furnace works really hard to keep all that liquid inside you warm, and when it’s doing that it has less energy to keep the rest of you warm. It may seem like getting out of bed will actually result in you being colder when you get back in, but the result is often surprisingly the opposite. Don’t hesitate to get up and take a leak.

 

Do you have other creative ways of staying warm? Have you found a sleep system that works well for you? Share your ideas in the comments below!

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Hiking by Helping: The Art of the Support Team

When my husband Troy told me he wanted to hike Vermont’s 272-mile Long Trail with his friend Brock, I was surprised. 

Troy and I have been hiking together since we met on the Appalachian Trail in 2017, and we’ve barely been apart for the last three years. But the Long Trail is a tough hike, and I knew I’d have a hard time keeping up with those long-legged men. So instead, we decided that I would support them on their journey by meeting them at trailheads in our van, providing food, drink, clean clothes, and dry socks. The Long Trail is remote in places and it would take an entire day to hitchhike into a town to resupply, wash clothes, get cleaned up, and hitchhike back, so keeping them fed would save them a lot of time and energy. By meeting up with Troy and Brock at regular intervals, they were able to make more miles and even take an occasional day off to rest.

Brock and Troy standing at the AT/LT trailhead in Williamstown, Massachusetts. | Credit: Karen Miller
Brock and Troy standing at the AT/LT trailhead in Williamstown, Massachusetts. | Credit: Karen Miller

Our planning began with the Guthook hiking phone app (an electronic guidebook), along with the Green Mountain Club’s Long Trail paper map, and a Vermont Gazetteer geographical guide, which allowed me to figure out which roads would be the best places to meet them, along with services, campgrounds, and grocery stores near the trail itself. A day before they started their hike, we went to Walmart and stocked up on all of the food they’d need for three weeks on the trail. And on August 23, I left them at the Appalachian Trail/Long Trail trailhead in Williamstown, Massachusetts, where they would hike a few miles to the Vermont border, the southern terminus of the Long Trail, and continue north until they reached Canada.

Troy and I have been hiking together since we met on the Appalachian Trail in 2017, and we’ve barely been apart for the last three years. But the Long Trail is a tough hike, and I knew I’d have a hard time keeping up with those long-legged men.

The Long Trail traverses almost all of the Green Mountains’ major summits, including Glastenbury Mountain, Stratton Mountain, Killington Peak, Mount Abraham, Mount Ellen, Camel’s Hump, Mount Mansfield, and Jay Peak. Our first meetup was to be at Kelly Stand Road, after 3 ½ days that included their first major climb, Glastenbury Mountain. The two hikers had big smiles on their faces when they saw me at the van with snacks, beer, and a cleanup station. We discovered a small camping area just down the road, where I served the hungry hikers barbecued chicken and coleslaw before turning in for the night. In the morning, Troy and Brock filled their food bags for another four days while I cooked them breakfast, and they were back on the trail in no time at all.

Troy and Brock filled their resupply boxes with food and supplies before they set out on the trail. | Credit: Karen Miller
Troy and Brock filled their resupply boxes with food and supplies before they set out on the trail. | Credit: Karen Miller

Our next meeting point was Clarendon Gorge, just a few miles from our friends’ home in Rutland. They had invited us to stay for the weekend, which was plenty of time for the hikers to take showers, rest, and resupply their food bags while I washed their clothes and shopped for our next meetup. After their “zero” day, I dropped them back on the trail and they “slackpacked”  nearly 18 miles into Killington, where I met them at the Inn at Long Trail for dinner. At this point the weather was turning colder and wetter, and Brock was getting discouraged. By the time the two had hiked into Brandon Gap a few days later, Brock was ready to head home. We were sad that he wasn’t enjoying his trip, and we hated to say goodbye, but that’s all part of life on the trail. Troy immediately got back on the Long Trail and hiked to Middlebury Gap, our next meeting place.   

By meeting up with Troy and Brock at regular intervals, they were able to make more miles and even take an occasional day off to rest.

Middlebury Gap is about halfway to the Canadian border, and this is where the hike becomes more difficult. Troy decided to take two days off before he would do the big push to the end of the trail. We stayed at Branbury State Park where we took walks, napped in our hammock, ate shrimp and grits, and watched an old Danny Kaye movie on my laptop. Troy was feeling well rested and strong as I dropped him off on the trail again. 

The next few days he would summit Mount Abraham, Lincoln Peak, Mount Ellen, and Camel’s Hump. On September 11, when I met him late in the evening at the Winnooski River, I could see he was exhausted, and cold. I cooked him a pot of Italian tortellini soup, and he slept long and hard into the next morning. I suggested he take another day off, but he was eager to go on, so after a breakfast of bagels with smoked salmon, cream cheese, and capers, he got back on the trail to do 37 more miles to our next meetup, climbing Mount Mansfield’s infamous Forehead, Lips, and Chin, along with Madonna Peak and Whiteface Mountain.

Nothing better than a cold beer after several days on the trail. | Credit: Karen Miller
Nothing better than a cold beer after several days on the trail. | Credit: Karen Miller

When we met at VT15, we took a day off at Elmore State Park, and after getting cleaned up we drove into Waterbury to visit the Green Mountain Club, Ben & Jerry’s, and a laundromat. At this point, Troy was well into the groove of the Long Trail, and eager to finish his trip. After going over the maps he decided he wanted to hike straight through to Canada, where I would meet him at the northern terminus, a place called “Journey’s End.” So the next morning after a hot breakfast, I left Troy at VT15 for the last 51 miles of his hike, while I hung out at Millbrook Campground in Westfield, just a 12-mile drive to the trailhead.

I felt closer to him than ever, knowing that being there for him helped him hike longer and stronger, and brought him back to me safe and sound.

On September 15, Troy hiked several short but steep climbs before his last big summit to Jay Peak. A few miles later, the trail became smoother and greener. “It’s like everything was improving as I got closer to Canada,” laughs Troy, remembering his last hours on the Long Trail. He arrived at the northern terminus at 5:11 p.m., and then took the approach trail to the Journey’s End parking lot where I was waiting for him in the van. My hiker man looked tired and cold, but he smiled broadly when I ran down the trail to embrace him.

To celebrate his success, we drove to Jay Village Inn for the night, where Troy enjoyed a well-earned sauna, shower, and a hearty meal of seafood and fine wine. After a good night’s sleep in a soft, warm bed, we talked about our hiking/supporting experiences over the last three weeks. I felt closer to him than ever, knowing that being there for him helped him hike longer and stronger, and brought him back to me safe and sound. We’re not sure where our upcoming adventures will take us, but next time, perhaps he’ll be supporting me!

Troy’s trail angel waits for the hikers’ arrival at Brandon Gap. | Courtesy: Karen Miller
Troy’s trail angel waits for the hikers’ arrival at Brandon Gap. | Credit: Troy Allen Lair

6 Tips for Finding Free Car Camping

Tired of camping at crowded campsites in your favorite National Park? It might be time to put in some work to provide you and yours with that wild and free car camping experience you’ve dreamed of. Yeah, campgrounds have hookups, potable water, and restrooms, but with these conveniences comes crowsd, fees, and loud generators. If you’re willing to give up some of these conveniences you’ll save your wallet a pretty penny and find a plethora of beautiful free campsites all over the U.S. that give you that solitude and wild camping experience you’ve yearned for. With some prep work and research you might find the new go-to spot for your weekend getaways.

1. Look for Public Land

Look at the area you’ll be visiting and check for public land designations such as National Forest and Bureau of Land Management land. Usually these two designations offer dispersed camping and are the most lenient with campers looking to stay for a while (up to 15 days in many places).

If there are National Forest or BLM lands in the area, check their websites (fs.fed.usand www.blm.gov, respectively) for info specific to the place you’re visiting. These websites often provide ample information on things like stay limits, fire restrictions, dispersed camping rules, weather in the area, and info on food containment for rodents and bears. You might also stop by the local Forest Service or BLM office to ask further questions or look at Motor Vehicle Use Maps (MVUM). If these are not available at their office, it may be available online at the previously mentioned websites. These MVUMs provide free campers with valuable information on land designations in the area, National Forest, BLM, Wilderness, and Residential boundaries as well as a detailed view of the roads that allow us access to these wild places.

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2. Check free campsite databases

Take a peak at websites like freecampsites.net. This user-driven database allows you to find free, paid, and boondock camping all over the U.S. on a map; You can even plug in your location and it will populate sites near you. We’re looking for green tent pins; these are free campsites. What’s also so handy about this database is the info about the sites you’re interested in. Each site has its own page with GPS coordinates, directions, weather info, cell service info, best sites in the area, and reviews/tips from previous campers. They may even provide info about the road to the site which is helpful if you don’t exactly have your dream rig just yet.

3. Seek the road less travelled

Super psyched on finding free camping in Zion this fall? So is everyone else. Consider locations that you think may be less popular during the time you plan to visit. This doesn’t mean rule out your dream location, just do your best to use the tools provided here and maybe make some calls before shooting out there and coming up empty handed. You might also consider campsites just outside of the National Park or attraction you’re hoping to visit on your trip. Yes, it may add a longer drive but, you’ll find the solitude you were looking for and may even discover a new go-to campsite for you to come back to in the future.

Credit: Ryan Wichelns
Credit: Ryan Wichelns

4. Arrive early

Do what you can to get to that dream spot as early as you can. This will ensure that you have a place to sleep for the night. If you need to run errands later, leave members of your group or items that indicate you are reserving this spot for the night such as a tent, car, etc. Opt-out of leaving items that make it look like you left trash and ditched the spot as this will damage the trust that locals and Rangers have for visitors. Again, consider asking your local Forest Service or BLM office if this it is recommended to leave a vehicle unattended as certain places have a high frequency of break-ins.

5. Ask around

Talk with locals in the area or folks at the local gear/camping store. Depending on the amount of traffic in the area, they may be willing to spill the beans on the locals-only spots. Be sure to be kind to these folks, they may be giving you the deets on some of their most prized locations. Treat these people and the sites they recommend with respect!

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6. Make your own database

Take the info you’ve gathered and save pins into your daily navigation apps. Google Maps works best, as it has more accurate navigation on backcountry roads than other apps such as Apple Maps or Waze. Google Maps also has a Satellite layer that allows you to preview the road leading to your site and may give you a sense of what type of road it is (paved, gravel, rock, etc). Using Google Maps, you can save pins allowing you to build your own database for yourself of prospective sites in the places you may wish to visit. Find a Plan A, B, C, etc., to ensure you find a place to rest your head at the end of the day. This will also make it easier to visit the area in the future, as you’ll have an array of options without having to do research all over again.


5 Reasons to Plan a Trip to Gros Morne National Park

Soaring fjords, sandy beaches, barren cliffs, boggy tundra, thick forests, and the Earth, naked. That’s Gros Morne National Park. Situated on the western coast of Newfoundland, the park was established in 1973 to protect a nearly 700-square-mile area of glacial and geological significance. It was later designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and is one of the best examples of the effects of continental drift. The isolated mountain tops are home to the physical remnants of ancient collisions and separations, further shaped by massive glaciers. But even if you’re not into geology, one look at any of the best-known spots in the park makes it easy to see why it’s worth the trip. And thanks in large part to the park’s geological wonders, there’s an incredible variety of outdoor fun to be had.

Credit: Katie Levy
Credit: Katie Levy

1. Explore Massive Fjords

This spot at the top of Western Brook Pond is one of the most famous views in Gros Morne National Park. And it’s one of a few similar views depending on how hard you’re willing to work to get to them. Gros Morne’s fjords were carved by ancient glaciers, and when the glaciers receded, the land rebounded, free from an incredible amount of pressure, cutting the ponds and lakes off from the sea.

Just driving along route 430 gives you glimpses of the fjord, but there’s more than one way to get up close to Western Brook Pond’s towering cliffs. Take a boat tour if you only have a few hours, or sign up for a guided hike if your goal is to stand near the top of the fjord. If you have multiple days and wilderness navigation experience, reserve a permit for one of the backcountry routes to go beyond the top of the fjord. Views of Ten Mile Pond are equally spectacular and can be seen from the top of Gros Morne Mountain, a 10 mile round trip day hike.

Credit: Katie Levy
Credit: Katie Levy

2. Have a Real Wilderness Backpacking Experience

If backcountry experiences described by Parks Canada as “mentally and physically challenging” sound appealing, then you’ve come to the right place. Exploring the Long Range Mountains isn’t for the faint of heart, and requires hikers to be completely self-sufficient. Proficiency in GPS and map and compass navigation is paramount; There are no maintained or marked trails, and plenty of game trails to throw unsuspecting hikers off route. Terrain can be muggy, boggy, snowy, rocky, and slippery, and depending on the season, the bugs are relentless. Weather can change in an instant, and if you get yourself in trouble, rescue can be days away.

Aside from the many hazards, the scenery is incredible. The Northern Traverse, Long Range Traverse, and a combination of the two are the best ways to see the most of the wilderness in the Long Range Mountains, but choose wisely, and read up on documentation from Parks Canada before you go. The more prepared you are for the terrain, weather, and navigational challenges, the better. Permits are required and must be reserved in advance.

Credit: Katie Levy
Credit: Katie Levy

3. Take a Walk on the Earth’s Mantle

“This rock I’m standing on used to be at the bottom of an ancient ocean,” is a pretty incredible realization to have on a hike. Gros Morne Tablelands were once thought to be remnants of molten rock, but when geologist Robert Stevens discovered rocks much older than other rocks in the area lower in elevation, he proved otherwise. The rocks had eroded from the Tablelands, illustrating that the Tablelands aren’t old molten rock. They’re really old remnants of an ancient ocean, pushed up from below during the collision of two ancient continents.

The rock is high in toxic heavy metals and other minerals, making it challenging for things to grow and leaving the majority of the terrain completely bare. But there’s still so much to see. Choose an out-and-back hike ranging from 1.8 to 5.6 miles in length, or a 7.5 mile off-trail loop, all starting from the Tablelands Trail parking area, to get up close and personal with this fascinating landscape.

Credit: Katie Levy
Credit: Katie Levy

4. Watch Beautiful Sunsets Beachside

Whether you’re winding down after a long day of hiking or just love hanging out near the water, there are plenty of beach spots to watch the sunset from. Green Point, home to the park’s northernmost campground, is known for long sandy beaches and beautiful views. After dinner in camp, wander the Coastal Trail for a 3.7-mile round-trip hike as the sun sets. Though less beach and more rock pile, Lobster Cove is a spectacular sunset spot. Explore Lobster Cove Head Lighthouse and take the trails down to the water.

Interested in a more rugged, hard to reach beach? Make the 5.6-mile round-trip on the Green Gardens Trail to Old Man Cove, just be sure to check tidal charts before you head down to the beach or explore the sea caves along it. And just outside the park boundary in Trout River, the short Eastern Point Trail is all beautiful ocean scenery all the way.

Credit: Katie Levy
Credit: Katie Levy

5. Day Hike All Sorts of Different Types of Terrain

Whether you’re a waterfall seeker, wildflower lover, summit chaser, or just looking for a leisurely stroll, there a day hike for everyone. Start with a day in the southern end of the park on the Green Gardens Trail to see Tablelands rock, deep forest, beach views, and sea caves all in one 5.6-mile hike. Then, another day on a landscape that looks and feels like another world in the Tablelands on the off trail loop (7.5 miles round-trip), or one of the shorter out and back routes.

Next, spend a long day climbing Gros Morne Mountain (10 miles round-trip) for spectacular views on a rocky, tree-less summit before heading to the Berry Hill Campground for a shorter day on the Baker’s Brook Falls Trail. The walk to the falls traverses deep woods on narrow boardwalks, perfect wildflower spotting terrain, and ends at a stunning cascade. Finally, finish your multi-terrain hiking adventure with a walk along the beach via the Coastal Trail or Old Mail Road.


The Ideal Car Camper's Kitchen

The benefits of adventuring in the outdoors are too numerous to count, but one excellent reason for getting outside is burning calories, or, should we say replacing them. While it’s awesome to end an all-day epic hiking Mount Mansfield with a burger from Doc Ponds or toast a day climbing the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle with a pint from the MOAT, a lot of the time all you want to do is simply retreat to camp and relax. For those who prefer going back to the campground and avoiding the town, here’s what you need to create those all-so-important—and tasty—meals without leaving the comforts of camp.

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Plan and Prep Ahead of Time

Before getting into the gear and goodies of a great car camping kitchen, it’s important to stress the benefits of getting as much meal planning and prep as possible done at home. Knowing what you’re going to eat and doing food preparation in advance, such as slicing vegetables, cutting meats, and pre-cooking some items, is an easy way to streamline the process. Once everything is prepped, pack it into see-through Tupperware. This minimizes the tasks you’ll need to do at camp, reduces the amount of stuff you have to bring, and, most importantly, speeds up cook time, which is key after something like a long day on Cadillac Mountain’s South Ridge Trail.

Plastic Bins for Organization

The key to any camp kitchen is being able to find what you need when you need it. To keep things simple, we prefer to divide our gear between two rugged bins with secure tops. One bin is used to store non-food items like pots, pans, cutlery, and paper towels; the other bin is used for any food that doesn’t need to be kept cold along with other necessities such as cooking oil and spices.

Pro Tip: Choose a bin long enough to hold your stove lengthwise. For example, you’ll want a bin about 20 inches long if you’re cooking on the super-popular Eureka Spire Stove.

Hard-Shell Cooler

A cooler is key to creating a restaurant-quality meal at camp, not to mention keeping celebratory craft beers cold. Sure, you can get away with a cheap cooler—but a high-end cooler like the YETI Tundra 45 Hard Cooler is capable of keeping food and beverages cold for a long weekend away, and in some cases even longer. Take your cooler game to the next level with YETI ICE (available in 1 lb., 2 lb., and 4 lb.) and say goodbye to messy old-fashioned ice bags.

Pro tip: Because opening a cooler too often drastically reduces its effectiveness, consider bringing a second soft-sided cooler like the Mountainsmith Cooloir 24 Soft Cooler if you’re planning on frequenting the cooler for beverages of the hoppy variety.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Two Burners are Better than One

A two-burner stove has been a staple of car camping kitchens for decades and continues today. Relatively lightweight and packable, a high-quality two-burner like the Eureka Spire LX Camp Stove that’s capable of running off of disposable Coleman Propane Canisters as well as larger propane tanks offers great versatility and provides plenty of range space for making two dishes simultaneously—for example, bacon and eggs or spaghetti and meat sauce. When it comes time to go, the Eureka Spire LX Camp Stove folds up for easy transportation.

Canister Stove

If you’re a coffee or tea lover, consider bringing a canister stove in addition to your two-burner stove. The Jetboil Flash is capable of boiling 16 oz. of water in a stunningly fast 100 seconds, enabling a quick caffeine hit and freeing up a burner on the “big stove” for food—a valuable commodity, especially when you’re cooking for a large group.

Cast Iron Skillet

Cast iron is heavy and cumbersome, but it’s also easy to clean and wears like…well, iron. Cast iron skillets last forever if properly cared for, which is music to the ears of everyone from environmentalists to those who just like to buy things once. Another versatile kitchen piece, you can cook with a cast iron skillet on your stove or use it over an open flame for “real” campfire cooking. A large ten-inch cast iron skillet paired with a smaller eight-inch skillet is ideal for preparing two-dish meals.

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Pots

A pot is the perfect complement to the cast iron skillets, as it’s better suited for jobs such as cooking pasta and rice, or simply boiling water for instant mashed potatoes. The MSR Ceramic 2-Pot Set nests within itself so it takes up minimum space and features a lid with an integrated strainer for maximum versatility. Thanks to their lightweight construction, these pots can do double duty and be hiked in on your next overnight on the Pemi Loop.

Water Storage

Sometimes you’re lucky and there’s a water spigot at your campsite, other times getting running water requires a short hike. A collapsible water storage bag like the 6L MSR DromLite Bag eliminates the need to go back and forth to get water for everything from cooking to drinking to cleaning.

Dishware and Cutlery

There are all sorts of clever dishware and cutlery—the Sea to Summit X-Seal and Go Collapsible Container and Kung Foon come immediately to mind—available for enjoying the delicacies created in your camp kitchen, but sometimes the simplest solution is the best. The GSI 1-Person Camp Dish Set comes with a lexan plate, bowl, and mug, along with a plastic fork, knife, and spoon set—essentially everything you need for eating at the campsite.

Pro Tip: Get a dedicated can opener and keep it with your camp cutlery. There is nothing more disheartening than getting ready to make burritos only to discover that you can’t open the can of beans.

Chef’s Tools

While just one spoon and a spatula will usually do, the GSI 3-Piece Ring Set delivers two spoons and a spatula. Combine it with a sharp knife and you’ll have everything you need for crafting killer camp cuisine.

Pro Tip: Add a GSI Compact Scraper or MSR Alpine Dish Brush/Scraper, based on the pots and pans you have, to your camp kitchen. It’s awesome for getting every last bit of food out of the pan and onto your plate, and it helps make cleaning up easy and each scraper is designed specifically to get into all the corners and crannies of the respective brand’s pots and pans.

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French Press

If your adventures are fueled as much by caffeine as stoke, a French press is a necessity. The GSI Glacier Stainless Commuter Javapress Mug combines a French press into a travel mug for an all-in-one way to get a caffeine high along with your mountain high.

Camp Sink

Washing dishes is a hassle at home, much less while camping. If you know the area you’re heading to doesn’t have a communal dish sink, a portable camp sink like the Sea to Summit The Kitchen Sink, 20L, helps make the job a little easier. It’s also worth noting that it helps get your dishes cleaner. Complement your sink with a biodegradable soap such as Sea to Summit Wilderness Wash and sponge for cleaning, along with a small pack towel (which can double as a pot holder in a pinch) for dish drying.

 

Are you a master of campsite culinary arts? Do you have a tip or key piece of gear for creating the ultimate car camping kitchen? Any favorite recipes? We want to hear it all—tell us in the comments below!


Hike It, Help It: Celebrating 200 Years of the Crawford Path

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Believe it or not, hiking for fun hasn’t always been a thing. 

Back 200-plus years ago, people were just a little more concerned with plowing the fields, hunting for food, and fighting for independence. Walking in the woods was something you did every day as a necessity—not so much something you did on your time off. 

Mount Washington changed that. 

When the Crawford family built the first recreational footpath to the top of the region’s highest peak in 1819, it wasn’t supposed to be something radical. It was really just a way to make things a little easier for the tourists who came from the big cities to marvel at the snow capped, rocky peaks, towering over New England. Instead, it ignited the area’s second revolution in less than 50 years. 

Before long, hundreds and then thousands of people were making the 8.5-mile trek along the expansive, tundra-like domes of the Southern Presidentials to the top of Mount Washington. More trails were cut, campsites and huts were built, gear was developed, organizations sprung up, and a sport—at least on this side of the ocean—was born, right in our backyard. 

Credit: Chris Shane
Credit: Chris Shane

This summer, 200 years after the Crawford Path—America’s oldest hiking trail—was built, Eastern Mountain Sports wants to celebrate it. 

That strip of dirt leading up Mount Washington still holds some of the country’s most jaw-dropping scenery, and the past time that grew up because of it is a point of Northeast pride, so help make sure the Crawford Path and trails like it stick around for at least another 200 years.

Shop online (men’s/women’s) or swing through EMS locations in North Conway, Concord, and Nashua and pick up a Techwick t-shirt celebrating the Crawford Path’s 200th Anniversary and 20 percent of that purchase will be donated to the White Mountain Trail Collective, which organizes a medley of professional trail maintenance organizations to update and care for the now two-century-old trails in the Whites, ensuring they all last just as long as the Crawford Path.

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Credit: Chris Shane
Credit: Chris Shane

Plus, wear your t-shirt in the Whites and post a photo to Instagram with the hashtags #goeast and #HikeItHelpIt for a chance to be featured on goEast and EMS’s social media.

That’s it! Take a hike where it all began and discover why, of all places, Mount Washington and the spectacular Southern Presidentials attracted hikers before hiking was even cool. And in the process, help EMS support the trails that will keep us hiking for another 200 years to come. 

See you out there!


How to Find Secret Paddle-In Campsites

You know it when you’ve found it: a special and secluded campsite along the shore to spend a night at during a paddling trip. One where you won’t hear generators running late into the night or over-the-top camp setups, or find the amenities of a typical campground. The simplicity of a campsite only accessible by boat can isn’t appealing to everyone, but for those that do, the best sites stand out and are often returned to year after year. Most of these remote spots are quietly managed by National Forest or other public lands efforts. They’re treasures, part of which is discovering them. Which is why we can’t tell you where they are. But, we can give you some tools you can use to find them on your own.

Credit: Effie Drew
Credit: Effie Drew

1. Pick up an atlas

In the age of digital media, one of the most effective ways to find backroads, campsites, and swim holes is still with an atlas or gazetteer. Familiarize yourself with the various symbols; often these campsites are designated with a square (“Point of Interest”), or tent symbol, not to be confused with that symbol for campground. If you already have a specific paddling trip in mind, like the Saranac River or Maine Isle Trail, a paper map designed for that trip should include smaller campsites that aren’t apart of a larger campground network.

2. Study Google Maps

It’s not going to show you private property boundaries but studying Google Earth is a great way to narrow down your search area away from vehicle-accessible areas. It’s easy to zoom in and download a certain spot to your phone so you can view it once you lose service. Look for coves, islands or other secluded spots along the water.

Credit: Effie Drew
Credit: Effie Drew

3. Talk to locals

Some of the best spots are never written about on popular publications, and instead passed on by word of mouth. A good place to start is by heading into the local outfitter or rental shop. Explain that you’re looking for a remote waterside spot to spend the night (on the lake or river) and see what information they’re willing to give up. Some spots are kept pretty hush, but many folks will steer you in the right direction.

4.  Understand land management

Bureau of Land Management or Forest Service lands aren’t as prevalent in the Northeast compared to out west, but there are plenty of public lands maintained by other groups like the Maine North Woods. These areas often have the most strategically placed campsites, so don’t be surprised if there’s a small fee to stay at them (some can be paid retroactively, but have cash on hand). Otherwise, National and State-managed Forests will be your bread and butter. Understanding where these jurisdictions are, and how they operate will help you determine where to camp.

Courtesy: Dave Moore
Courtesy: Dave Moore

5. Read guidebooks

Paddling Guidebooks can offer some of the best intel on where you may want to be traveling and camping on the water. Even if you aren’t planning to do an entire trip, a guidebook covering a wider area, like the North Forest Canoe Trail or Adirondacks, will give you more than enough information to find the perfect spot for a night away.