A Leaf-Peeper's Guide to the Northeast's Fall Foliage

Fall is in the air. The mornings are crisp and cool, and at higher elevations, speckles of fall colors amid the summery green have begun to emerge. The woods have fallen silent as birds hunker down and ready themselves for their great migration. Photosynthesis also slows to a stop. For the winter, the bright green, sugar-producing factories within the leaves shut down, giving those red, orange, and yellow pigments time to shine. Not long from now, a blanket of fall-ripened leaves will be scattered along the Northeast’s trails. It’s officially leaf-peeping season, the best time of the year to hike and climb. Those pesky black flies are gone, the air is the perfect temperature, and the scenery is unmatched.

2017’s fall foliage predictions are promising. If September weather permits, we may be looking at a particularly vibrant autumn. While the 2016 drought would normally affect the forest unfavorably, the several large snowfall events followed by warming this past winter resulted in plenty of snowmelt to recharge the soil moisture, leading to healthy forest foliage over the summer. Typically, trees stressed by drought cause the leaves to change earlier. However, fall’s projected higher temperatures combined with sun and cool nights could counteract this pattern by delaying foliage change. Therefore, this season’s peak foliage timeline is very close to the average.

Credit: Lida
Credit: Lida

When will the foliage peak?

Based on the National Fall Foliage Prediction map, the Northeast’s first peak foliage period starts later this month.

Northern NY, VT, NH, ME Remaining VT, NH, ME, Upstate NY MA, CT, RI, Northern PA, Remaining NY NJ, Remaining PA, MD, DE
Aug. 20 Minimal
Aug. 27 Patchy
Sept. 3 Partial
Sept. 10 Near Peak
Sept. 17 Peak
Sept. 24 Past Peak
Oct. 1
Oct. 8
Oct. 15

These estimations all depend on the weather from September through October. So, before planning your fall trip, check the weekly foliage report to get the most up-to-date information.

Where can I see the best fall foliage?

If you time it right, there are plenty of places to view the fall scenery:

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Lake Placid, NY

A small mountain town in the Northern Adirondacks’ High Peaks Region, the Village of Lake Placid is situated on Mirror Lake and has plenty of shops and restaurants to explore. Just six miles out of town, you can find the Adirondack Loj at Heart Lake. For an easy hike with relatively little effort, head to the summit of Mount Jo, a 2.6-mile round-trip hike with spectacular views of the High Peaks. Epic views from the top are, in fact, screensaver worthy. And, that’s no joke: Apple has a fall scene from the top of Mt. Jo as one of their screensavers. If you are looking for a more challenging hike, the High Peaks are accessible from the same parking lot.

Estimated peak foliage range: Last week of September to the first week in October

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Woodstock, NY

A historic mountain town in the heart of the Catskills, Woodstock prides itself on fostering a connection with art and nature. Here, Overlook Mountain has been an important spiritual centerpiece, and this hike up has no shortage of interesting features! In fact, a fire tower at the top looks out over the gorgeous Hudson Valley. At its base sits a Buddhist temple for hikers to respectfully explore. On the way up this gentle grade, you will run into the remains of the Overlook Mountain House.

Estimated peak foliage range: Third to the fourth week of October

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Stowe, VT

Stowe, VT is well known for its picturesque fall scenery and outdoor recreation during the winter. This quaint, warm town has everything from biking and hiking to art events and museums.

The Pinnacle hiking trail is a 3.1-mile round-trip beginner hike near Stowe and offers a view of Mount Mansfield that will knock your socks off. Alternatively, for more of a challenge, you can hike Mount Mansfield itself—an eight-mile loop—that will get you to the very top of Vermont at 4,393 ft.

Estimated peak foliage range: Third and fourth weeks of September

 

There are, of course, hundreds more locations where you can view the Northeast’s fall foliage. Even a simple walk in the woods or a car ride down an old country road can be a breathtaking experience. Just get out there, wherever you can, and try to enjoy the fall colors!

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