Why Should I Hike New Hampshire's "52 With A View"?

Just how big of a draw are New Hampshire’s 4,000-footers? As one clear indication, look no further than the parking situation in Franconia Notch. Drive through the Notch on almost any weekend, and you’ll notice the vast number of cars parked along the highway. This isn’t unique to Franconia Notch, however. Trailheads for popular 4,000-footers are routinely teaming with list-obsessed hikers, ourselves included.

Yet, unbeknownst to many, there’s another excellent New Hampshire hiking list—the “52 With a View” (52 WaV). Broad geographic diversity, options for every ability level, and some of the state’s most scenic views make it a must-do. Here’s why you should check them out on your next hike.

Mount Avalon. | Credit: Tim Peck
Mount Avalon. | Credit: Tim Peck

History of the 52 WaV

In 1990, a group called the Over the Hill Hikers started the 52-With-a-View Club as a way to draw attention to New Hampshire’s mountains that don’t reach the magical 4,000-foot mark. Ranging from just over 2,500 feet in elevation to just under 4,000 feet, every one on the 52 WaV list delivers a stunning view, either on the way to or from the summit. As well, encouraging hikers to explore these under-4,000 footers reduces the pressure on some of New Hampshire’s most important natural resources.

Picture-Perfect Peaks

There is something to appreciate on every summit, whether it’s a feeling of accomplishment or a prime perspective. While all of New Hampshire’s 4,000-footers deliver a physical test, many come up short when it comes to views. Owl’s Head, Waumbek, Galehead, Hale, and Field all jump to mind, while Tecumseh, South Hancock, and Passaconaway offer limited views at best. Unlike these mountains, every one on the 52 WaV list delivers an amazing view. And, depending upon which peak you visit, the sights may be far superior to what you’ll see from some 4,000-footers.

Geographic Diversity

While New Hampshire’s 4,000-footers are all located in the same part of the state, the 52 WaV list offers greater geographical diversity. Firstly, this helps get you away from the crowds bagging 4,000-footers. Secondly, it’s an excuse to explore other parts of New Hampshire. And, depending upon where you’re coming from, you may even spend less time in the car.

In Southern New Hampshire, Mount Monadnock and Mount Kearsarge stand out. Mount Shaw and Mount Roberts are Lakes Region highlights. In Western New Hampshire, Mount Cardigan and Mount Cube are fantastic hikes. Northern New Hampshire is home to Eagle Crag, Mount Hayes, and Mount Success—which, by its name alone, you should save for last. And, around the Conway area are the Moats, Mount Chocorua, and the other Mount Kearsarge, also known as Kearsarge North.

Middle Sugarloaf. | Credit: Doug Martland
Middle Sugarloaf. | Credit: Doug Martland

Varying Difficulties

Even the easiest-to-summit 4,000-footers require hiking a fair amount of mileage and entail considerable elevation gain. Although the 52 WaV list has some challenging hikes—for example, Sandwich Mountain (sometimes called Sandwich Dome) is as hard as, if not harder than, many 4,000-footers—many are great for first-time hikers or for bringing the family along. Hikes like Mount Willard, Mount Pemigewasset, the Sugarloafs, Hedgehog, and Welch-Dickey let you explore the Whites without the elevation gain, challenging terrain, and time commitment.

Forecasting Fun

Lower elevations and shorter mileage make the 52 WaV peaks a good backup whenever bad weather and high winds are buffeting the higher summits. Likewise, many of these shorter peaks are great starter trips for those new to winter hiking.

Monadnock's Ridge. | Credit: Tim Peck
Monadnock’s Ridge. | Credit: Tim Peck

Add On

Depending on how much you’ve accomplished in the Whites, the 52 With a View can be everything from a great starting point to something entirely new. For those who have already completed the New Hampshire 4,000-footers and are looking for something different, this list is an awesome alternative. Even if you’re working on the NH48, a handful of the 52 WaV can easily be tied into bigger trips. For instance, include Avalon on a hike across Willey, Field, and Tom, and the majority who summit Mount Waumbek first cross over the top of Starr King.

Type-A Fun on the B List

For super-ambitious, Type-A personalities, many of the 52 WaV can be hiked in the same day, thanks to their shorter mileage. And, Redliners will need to cross many of these peaks, as the trails leading to them are in the AMC’s White Mountain Guide.


The List

# Mountain Elevation in feet
1 Sandwich Mountain 3960
2 Mount Webster 3910
3 Mount Starr King 3907
4 The Horn 3905
5 Shelburne Moriah Mountain 3735
6 Sugarloaf Mountain 3700
7 North Baldface 3600
8 Mount Success 3565
9 South Baldface 3560
10 Mount Chocorua 3480
11 Stairs Mountain 3468
12 Jennings Peak 3440
13 Mount Avalon 3440
14 Percy Peaks, North Peak 3420
15 Mount Resolution 3415
16 Magalloway Mountain 3383
17 Mount Tremont 3371
18 Three Sisters 3354
19 Kearsarge North (Chatham, NH) 3268
20 Mount Martha (Cherry Mtn / Owl’s Head) 3248
21 Smarts Mountain 3238
22 West Royce Mountain 3200
23 Mount Paugus 3198
24 North Moat Mountain 3196
25 Imp Face 3165
26 Mount Monadnock 3165
27 Mount Cardigan 3155
28 Mount Crawford 3119
29 North Doublehead 3053
30 Mount Parker 3004
31 Mount Shaw 2990
32 Eastman Mountain 2939
33 Kearsarge Mountain (Warner, NH) 2937
34 Mount Hibbard 2920
35 Mount Cube 2909
36 Stinson Mountain 2900
37 Mount Willard 2865
38 Black Mountain (Benton, NH) 2830
39 Eagle Crag / Mount Meader 2782
40 South Moat Mountain 2760
41 Black Mountain, Middle Peak 2757
42 Dickey Mountain / Welch Mountain 2734 / 2605
43 Iorn Mountain 2726
44 Potash Mountain 2680
45 Blueberry Mountain 2662
46 Mount Israel 2620
47 Square Ledge 2600
48 Mount Roberts 2582
49 Mount Pemigewasset 2557
50 Mount Hayes 2555
51 Middle Sugarloaf 2539
52 Hedgehog Mountain 2532

If you have a favorite on the 52 With a View list, we want to hear about it. Leave a comment telling us which one you love and why somebody should visit it!