8 Reasons Everyone Should Have a Puffy Vest

If you’re like us, puffy vests hark back to long-forgotten memories of Michael J. Fox in Back to the Future. However, thanks to the advent of active insulation, the puffy vest (Men’s/Women’s) is back and more versatile than ever—so much so that we find ourselves using one everywhere from windy ridgelines in the summer to icy-cold chairlifts in the winter. Best of all, as they’ve gotten more adept in the outdoors, they’ve also gotten more stylish, making them great for both romping in the mountains and cruising around Hill Valley. Here are eight reasons you should add one to your gear closet this season.

EMS-Hike-Compass-Pant-M-0464

1. It’s the do-it-all layer

Whatever the season, we always have a puffy insulating layer in our packs. Sometimes, if it’s cold enough, we’ll even carry two. But, often, what we really want is to keep our core warm on the move without overheating. And, this is where puffy vests with active insulation really shine: They provide enough insulation to keep you warm, and due to their breathable fill and sleeveless fit, they also prevent you from overheating while you’re in motion. Seriously, when was the last time you went on a hike, climb, or ride and complained your arms were cold? Keeping the core warm is what counts.

2. You hardly ever need to take one off

As climbers in the early 2000s, we were inspired by Mark Twight’s book Extreme Alpinism and adopted many of the ideas presented into our own outdoor activities. One that’s stuck through the years is the “action suit”—a couple of layers that are rarely taken off during activity. An active insulation vest fits perfectly into this system, especially when it comes to cold-weather pursuits: It provides enough warmth when the pace slows, while its ability to breathe and vent heat is great for fast summit pushes.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

3. They weigh nearly nothing

Along the same lines, there is no sense in carrying around a jacket with sleeves if you don’t need them. And, simply choosing a vest over a jacket offers considerable weight savings. For example, look at the listed weight for one of our favorite active insulation pieces, the Outdoor Research Ascendant: A large men’s Ascendant Hoody tips the scales at 13 oz., while its counterpart, the Ascendant Vest, comes in at a mere 7.8 oz. Imagine how much you’ll save if, instead, you swap out that old heavy fleece jacket.

4. They take up less room in your pack

Speaking of that fleece jacket, opting for an active insulation vest saves space, too. Because vests use less material and fill than jackets, they take up far fewer inches in a pack—enough that you’ll be able to sneak in an extra layer for the next trip, or simply downsize your pack.

5. No annoying bunchy arms

Annoyed by how all your layers bunch in the arms? Or, how the sleeves of your top layer pull up the sleeves of your lower garments? Vests obviously minimize these issues. Furthermore, puffy vests deliver better mobility, with almost as much warmth. And, they are less likely to ride up when you’re reaching above your head for that next axe placement on Shoestring Gully.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

6. There’s less wear and tear

Whether you’re hiking through the near-treeline thicket on a windy fall day, scratching up the Lion Head Winter Route, or transitioning from up to down on an epic backcountry spring skiing mission, you’ll probably be wearing an insulating layer. And, the elbows and forearms on it are going to take a beating, especially if you’re wearing a puffy jacket. Avoid this problem by choosing a vest instead.

7. Improving on a tried-and-true design

Historically, fleece has been the go-to material for midlayers, as its breathability often gave it an advantage over puffies. However, the advent of active insulation essentially nullified that. Particularly, active insulation puffy vests are lighter, more packable, more wind resistant, and warmer than their traditional fleece counterparts.

8. They’re cheaper

Another great thing about puffy vests with active insulation is, since they use less material than their full-sleeved equivalents, they’re typically less expensive.

 

Have another reason puffy vests are the way to go? Tell us about it in the comments!

EMS-Primaloft-Vest-6144-(1)


Alpha Guide: The Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle

alpha Guides | Better than beta.

The Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle offers moderate climbing in an incredible setting on one of the Northeast’s most iconic mountains.

Break away from hopeful summiteers on the Lion Head and Tuckerman Ravine Trails and head to Huntington Ravine and the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle to find relative seclusion on one of the region’s busiest mountains. This must-do moderate alpine climb on Mount Washington, New England’s tallest and most infamous mountain, racks up the fun while delivering incredible exposure, an unprecedented view of Huntington Ravine, and one of the best pitches you’ll find anywhere, the Fairy Tale Traverse.

Quick Facts

Distance: Roughly 6 miles, loop up the Pinnacle and down the Lion Head.
Time to Complete: Full day
Difficulty: ★★★★ (5.7, Grade III)
Scenery: ★★★★★


Season: Late-May to October
Fees/Permits: None
Contact: https://www.fs.usda.gov/whitemountain 

Download

Turn-By-Turn

Most climbers approach Huntington Ravine from the AMC Pinkham Notch Visitor Center in Gorham, about a 30-minute drive from North Conway. Getting to Pinkham Notch from North Conway is very straightforward: Simply follow Route 16 North. Roughly 12 miles past the Glen intersection, the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center is on the left.

Directions are just as easy for climbers coming from the north. From Gorham, just follow Route 16 South for approximately 12 miles, and the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center will be on the right. Ample parking is available in the main lot. However, it’s common for the main parking lot to be full on busy weekends; in this case, use the overflow lot on Route 16, just south of the Visitor Center.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

The Approach

The approach to the Pinnacle takes two to 2.5 hours for most climbers. It begins on the Tuckerman Ravine Trail (TRT), which starts in back of the Visitor Center. This segment of the TRT is a rocky dirt road that consistently heads uphill. Follow it for about 1.7 miles, until it intersects with the Huntington Ravine Fire Road.

At the junction (44.263844, -71.277946), turn right onto the Huntington Ravine Fire Road, and follow it for about a mile, until it intersects with the Huntington Ravine Trail (HRT) (44.267830, -71.277084). The fire road is wide and flat and ideal for making good time.

Once on the HRT, follow it uphill into Huntington Ravine. The trail starts off quite mellow, but turns to boulder hopping and then talus slogging as climbers get farther into the ravine. Pinnacle Buttress is the prominent ridge on the climber’s left (south) side, and as the ravine’s most striking feature, it is hard to miss. Keep hiking up the HRT, until a well-worn climber’s path branches off left. Follow it across a stream coming down Pinnacle Gully and to the left-facing gully that marks the start of the climb. There’s a nice spot to gear up at the climb’s base (44.274509, -71.288536); just be conscious of rock fall.

For a faster approach, drive up the Mount Washington Auto Road to the seven-mile mark and then hike down the Huntington Ravine Trail, until it intersects with the climber’s path. The descent takes hikers across the Alpine Garden and then down into Huntington Ravine. Once in the ravine, the HRT is steep and exposed, so exercise caution, especially if the rock is wet. This approach isn’t for everybody, but it only takes about 40 minutes, and for an additional advantage at the end of the climb, your car is right nearby.

On top of the first pitch. | Credit: Tim Peck
On top of the first pitch. | Credit: Tim Peck

The Opening Pitches

Most climbers break the route’s first 300 feet into two 150-foot pitches. Marking the start of the climb, the first begins by climbing the bottom of the prominent left-facing gully (5.easy) to a ledge, and then continues up and right over a slab and a right-facing corner. The final corner is the pitch’s crux (5.5), but it is well-protected and easy to read. There’s a nice, albeit mildly exposed, ledge to belay on atop the corner.

The second pitch follows a well-worn footpath around bushes and over a couple of slabby sections toward an obvious alcove below another right-facing corner. The climbing itself is generally quite easy (5.2), with the crux being a step out of a runnel and onto a slab. At the alcove, there are ample gear options on climber’s right for building a belay anchor.

Pro Tip: Since getting off the Pinnacle in a storm can be an ordeal and will require leaving gear, it’s a good idea to plan on re-confirming the weather as you enter the ravine and again before you start climbing. And, while going up may not be the best option, if you’re caught in bad weather mid-climb, there are easier variations on climber’s left.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

The Business

The third pitch leaves the alcove and climbs the right-facing corner. Although not apparent at first glance, the corner protects well enough, with a pin in the middle and options for gear both above (medium cam) and below (small nut). The mantle onto the ledge atop the corner is the crux of the climb (5.7).

The third pitch continues above the ledge, and it is easy to get off route here. The most obvious route climbs directly up, eventually reaching an overhang with several fixed pins. But, that’s the 5.8 variation. If you do it, some thoughtful climbing takes you straight up through two pins. Then, step out left for a couple of strenuous and exposed moves protected by two more pins. Above the overhang, easy terrain heads up and right toward the Pinnacle’s final pitches. Belay here.

Remaining on the traditional route (and thus keeping the grade at 5.7) requires splitting the third pitch in two. Once atop the initial corner, head left to another corner and then climb back right up a ramp to a belay. From the belay, leave the ledge, and head down and left on a ramp until you’re under a chimney. Climb up through the chimney and to another belay ledge near the Pinnacle’s final pitches.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

The Interlude

Whichever variation you choose, the two routes rejoin in the easy terrain just below the Pinnacle’s last pitches. Most climbers do a very easy and short fourth pitch to get to the bottom of a large, bushy area.

Pitch 5 heads through the alpine scrub and toward a small rock step. If you’re heading for the Fairy Tale Traverse—and you should be, unless the weather is starting to turn—climb the step’s right side (5.6), hugging the edge of the arete. Continue along the edge of the arete for about 100 feet, until you reach a ledge and block near the start of the traverse. Belay here.

Since the climbing along the arete is awkward and has considerable exposure, it may feel like you’re off route. You’re not, however. If you’re at all uncertain, there are a couple of pins just left of the arete that serve as signposts.

The Fairytale Traverse. | Credit: Tim Peck
The Fairy Tale Traverse. | Credit: Tim Peck

The Money Pitch

As you belay atop Pitch 5, glance around the block. You’ll see a horizontal crack cutting straight across a smooth granite face. A little below, the face drops away, and Pinnacle Gully opens up. The upcoming pitch, known as the Fairy Tale Traverse, is fantastic. The climbing is excellent, the setting is one of the best in the East, and the exposure is tremendous. Once you start traversing, be sure to savor the moment; climbing doesn’t get much better than this.

From the belay, step down below the crack, and begin traversing, using the crack for your hands and friendly edges for your feet. Traverse the crack (5.5, ample protection) across the face, and then, follow it up for about 20 feet to a large platform. Belay here or top out first by climbing a small 25-foot step up to the blocky terrain atop the Pinnacle.

The final pitch before the top of the Pinnacle. | Credit: Tim Peck
The final pitch before the top of the Pinnacle. | Credit: Tim Peck

On Top of the Pinnacle

With the technical climbing behind you and ample places to sit comfortably, the top of the Pinnacle provides a perfect setting for switching from climbing to approach shoes, stashing the rope and rack, and getting ready to make your way back to Pinkham Notch. Before leaving, take a moment to soak up the fantastic view, with the Wildcats and Carters stretched out before you and Henderson Ridge to your left.

Pro Tip: Have a windshirt and puffy coat somewhere easily accessible in preparation for the unknown weather ahead.

Crossing the Alpine Garden. | Credit: Tim Peck
Crossing the Alpine Garden. | Credit: Tim Peck

Crossing the Alpine Garden

From the top of the Pinnacle, climbers should continue moving up the mountain, following a well-traveled footpath through the delicate alpine grasses. Eventually, the footpath gives way to a steep section of rocks and boulders that leads to the Alpine Garden Trail (44.273743, -71.292091). While it can be tempting to forge ahead toward Mount Washington’s summit or Pinkham Notch, the boulder field offers a great view of the top of the Pinnacle, and puts the route’s exposure into stark relief. Give the route one last glance before you continue on.

Located on the unprotected flanks of Mount Washington, the Alpine Garden Trail will likely have conditions different from what you experienced in Huntington Ravine. If you stashed a windshirt or puffy at the top of your pack, you’ll likely be reaching for it here. To head down via the traditional descent, follow the Alpine Garden Trail (AGT) south for a little over a half-mile to its connection with the Lion Head Trail (44.265045, -71.295601).

If you’re intent on continuing up to the summit (or if you took the Auto Road approach), turn right on the AGT and aim directly for the humongous cairn atop the intersection of the AGT and the HRT. From there, head uphill on the HRT for 0.3 miles, until it intersects with the Mount Washington Auto Road at the junction with the Nelson Crag Trail. Follow the Nelson Crag Trail 0.8 miles to the top, or if you parked at the junction, hop into your car and drive down.

Pro Tip: If you’re making a summit attempt, use good judgment, and consider the weather, time of day, and your own energy reserves before heading up. While it’s only a mile, the steep and rugged nature of the climb— combined with the weight of a rope and rack—can make it a long, slow slog.

Descending Lion Head with Tuckerman's Ravine in the background. | Credit: Tim Peck
Descending Lion Head with Tuckerman Ravine in the background. | Credit: Tim Peck

The Normal Descent

Assuming you take the normal descent route, the Lion Head Trail (LHT) below the Alpine Garden isn’t made any easier by your climbing gear’s additional weight. Hugging the outside of Tuckerman Ravine, the LHT offers a rocky, steep, and direct path to treeline. If the weather cooperates, the Lion Head proper (44.264.042, -71.291275) is a great place to stop, admire the view, and give weary legs a rest.

After dipping below treeline, the Lion Head Trail’s steep and rocky nature changes. Specifically, this section features some short up-and-down areas, slabs, and tree roots. Pay careful attention when navigating, as it is frequently wet. Finally, 1.1 miles after joining the LHT from the Alpine Garden, the trail connects with the Tuckerman Ravine Trail just below HoJos.

Back on the trail where the day began, the Tuckerman Ravine Trail leads climbers down the final 2.3 miles to Pinkham Notch while losing 1,800 feet in elevation. Don’t let the width deceive you, however. The trail is very rugged and presents more of a challenge than most will want at this point in the day. On a positive note, it allows you to walk side-by-side with your climbing partner, and offers an opportunity to relive the day’s best pitches, which always seems to make the descent go by faster.


Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

The Kit

  • The average high temperature on Mount Washington’s summit in July is 53°F. Because of this, it’s smart to always pack a puffy coat, like the lightweight, packable, and hooded Arc’teryx Atom SL (men’s/women’s).
  • A trip up the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle involves a lot of hiking through rough terrain with a heavy pack, which is made easier with the use of a trekking pole. Black Diamond’s Distance FLZ Trekking Poles (men’s/women’s) offer the support needed for the hike in and out of Huntington Ravine, and can easily be stashed up and stowed away in your pack while you’re climbing.
  • Hauling climbing gear into Huntington Ravine is no easy task. Luckily, you can lighten your load with Black Diamond’s new Ultralight Cams (.5, .75, #1, #2, #3).
  • A lightweight rope is another easy way to keep pack weight down. The Sterling Nano IX 9.0 mm is a great choice for those heading into alpine terrain. First climbed in 1928, the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle has no monster pitches, and 60 meters is more than enough rope.
  • The Black Diamond Speed 22 is the perfect pack for a trip up the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle, big enough to handle a rope, rack, and multiple layers, plus food and water, and also compresses well and fits great while you’re climbing.

On the Tuckerman Ravine Trail. | Credit: Tim Peck
On the Tuckerman Ravine Trail. | Credit: Tim Peck

Keys to the Trip

  • Mount Washington has rightfully earned the reputation as “home of the world’s worst weather.” So, consult Mount Washington’s forecast before leaving, and if the weather isn’t in your favor, consider another objective.
  • The Northeast Ridge is a classic route on one of the Northeast’s most popular mountains. Consider getting there early or climbing during the week to avoid the crowds.
  • This route has no bolted anchors. So, if you’re planning on three-piece anchors at every belay, plan your rack accordingly. A normal rack for the route might be 10 cams (0.3, 0.4, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 2, 3, with doubles of 0.5, 0.75, and 1), a size run of nuts (5-13), a couple of small tricams, and eight to 10 alpine draws. Climbers comfortable at the grade might bring a little less, while leaders near their limit might want to bring a little more.
  • A big day on the Rockpile deserves a big meal. Margarita Grill is located right near the intersection of Routes 302 and 16, and serves drool-worthy nachos and gigantic burritos.
  • If you’re not sure you’re up for leading the route but really want to climb it, the Eastern Mountain Sports Climbing School will be happy to guide you up it.

Current Conditions

Have you recently climbed the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle? What did you think? Post your experience in the comments for others!


How to Choose a Backpacking Stove

Energy gels and bars are great for day trips in the mountains. But, if you’re spending more than just a day out, odds are you’ll eventually want something more substantial (and warm) to eat, which often involves using a stove. Which stove, you ask? Well, that depends on what exactly you want to heat up. These days, there’s a camp stove to satisfy everyone, from those who simply want to boil water to forest-bound foodies. For the best option to cook your next backcountry breakfast, campsite cuisine, or mountaintop meal, keep reading.

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Fuel Type

Backpacking stoves are distinguished by fuel type, and fall into three main categories: canister, liquid fuel, and alternative fuel. Canister and liquid fuel stoves represent the majority you’ll see on the trail. However, in recent years, alternative fuel stoves have seen a surge in popularity.

Canister Stoves

Powered by prepackaged canisters holding a pressurized butane-propane blend, canister stoves are incredibly easy to use—just screw the stove to the canister and fire it up. Coming in a wide variety of shapes and sizes, canister stoves vary from simple, super-light burners to full integrated systems. Requiring very little maintenance (shy of changing fuel bottles), they deliver reliable performance in three-season conditions and are also quick to light. Big picture, you don’t have to worry about fuel leaking out of the bottle.

Canister stoves do have some drawbacks, though. For one thing, it can be difficult to gauge just how much fuel is left. Another issue, some super-light stoves have difficulty supporting a larger pot, while the larger, integrated systems may be tall and tip prone. Additionally, for models without built-in pressure regulators, cold weather or high altitudes can freeze and depressurize a canister, causing the stove to stutter. Also, compared to white gas, prepackaged fuel is expensive and may be harder to find outside of the United States. Lastly, the prepackaged canisters cannot be refilled and recycling them may be frustrating, as most municipalities have special rules in place.

READ MORE: How do I know how much fuel is left in my canister?

Pro Tip: If you’re going to use a canister stove in cold weather, storing the fuel canister in a warm place—your jacket pocket while you’re moving or your sleeping bag while you’re sleeping—will make it less likely to depressurize.

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Integrated Canister Stoves

With an integrated canister stove, all the individual components (canister, burner, pot, and lid) work together. Due to their interlocking nature, they have a high energy transfer rate between the burner and pot and excel at heating water quickly. They are quick and simple to assemble and, on many models, nest inside the cooking pot for easy storage while you’re moving. And, for folks who hike in varying group sizes—sometimes solo, sometimes with friends—you can customize the pot for your particular outing.

Liquid Fuel Stoves

Reliable and time tested, liquid fuel stoves are known for their versatility and ability to run in a wide variety of conditions. More commonly powered by white gas, some models, such as the venerable MSR Whisperlite International, use any kind of liquid fuel—kerosene and diesel included. This makes them popular with people who travel to locations where canisters or white gas could be hard to acquire. Unlike canister stoves, liquid fuel stoves use special refillable bottles. In turn, backpackers easily know much fuel they have at any given time, can reuse the same container, and only bring as much as they’ll need.

One downside is, they require priming, a finicky process. Liquid fuel stoves also need periodic maintenance. The jets and fuel hose can get clogged, especially when fuels other than white gas, which may have more impurities, are used, and the O-rings occasionally need to be replaced. Another drawback, liquid fuel stoves tend to be heavier and don’t pack as well as canister options. And, since spills suck, don’t forget to keep your fuel bottle sealed at all times when not in use.

Some stoves, like the MSR Whisperlite International, can operate using either liquid or canister fuels, making them even more versatile.

READ MORE: Should I use a canister or liquid fuel stove?

Credit: Ryan Wichelns
Credit: Ryan Wichelns

Alternative Fuel Stoves

Alternative stoves use everything from wood to denatured alcohol to solid fuel tablets. Wood-powered stoves, for instance, burn twigs and small sticks and let you hike without carrying a fuel canister or bottle. Denatured alcohol stoves are super-lightweight, have very few parts, and use a fuel that is inexpensive and readily available. Solid fuel stoves are light and inexpensive but, as a drawback, may leave a residue on your cook pot.

In recent years, alternative fuel stoves have seen an increase in popularity. But, because they each have unique limitations—most notably, they do not burn as hot or boil water as quickly as canister or liquid fuel stoves—their use remains niche. Still, they make nice complementary stoves to more traditional options.

GO: Canister Stoves | Liquid Fuel Stoves | Canister or Liquid Fuel Stoves

Courtesy: MSR
Courtesy: MSR

Other Considerations

When choosing your next backpacking stove, fuel type is just one consideration. Weight, boiling time, simmering ability, and lighting method are other factors that should influence your purchase.

Weight

It’s easy to be lured by a stove’s lighter weight. However, when comparing stove weights, remember to account for the fuel and required cook set, especially when comparing standard models to integrated systems.

Boiling Time

Almost all backpacking stove manufacturers tell you how long it takes for a particular stove to boil a liter of water. And, if boiling time is your most important criterion—say, for that cup of coffee or that Good To-Go Thai Curry—consider an integrated canister stove. Their extremely efficient transfer of heat from the burner to the pot often results in the fastest boiling times. Just don’t expect to replicate these exact results on your next backpacking trip on the Pemi: Stoves are typically tested at sea level in 70-degree Fahrenheit temperatures with no wind.

Simmering

For a stove that does more than boil water, you’ll want to choose a model with a simmering option. Liquid fuel stoves generally offer the easiest degree of heat control. However, with a little practice, more complex dishes can even be cooked on an integrated system.

Lighting Method

Many stoves today ignite via a button (or “piezo”). This handy feature increases the ease of operation, but we still suggest carrying matches or a lighter just in case. However you light it, once your stove is going, don’t ever cook inside the tent—carbon monoxide kills!

Courtesy: MSR
Courtesy: MSR

So, Which Stove Should I Get?

Although most models you’ll find at EMS are fairly versatile, here are a few activity-based suggestions:

Solo or fast-and-light: Consider a simple canister stove. If that’s not light enough, check out a denatured alcohol or solid fuel option.

New to backpacking or just eating freeze-dried meals: Integrated systems are easy to use and boil water very efficiently.

Going out with a large group: Liquid gas stoves are perfect for large groups, and for this reason, they’ve been a staple of NOLS and Outward Bound trips for years. Pro tip: Going out with a large group and love coffee? Supplement your liquid gas stove with an integrated stove for quickly brewing that crucial cup of coffee in the morning.

Can’t decide: Check out the MSR Whisperlite Universal, which can use either IsoPro canisters or liquid fuel.


Alpha Guide: Mount Greylock's Thunderbolt Trail

alpha Guides | Better than beta.

Steep, short, and scenic—a hike to Mount Greylock’s summit via the Thunderbolt Trail is the most direct way to the highest point in Massachusetts.

Hiking to the summit of Mount Greylock via the Thunderbolt Trail takes you through some of the East Coast’s most hallowed ski terrain and across the rugged Appalachian Trail, and is the steepest and shortest route to the highest point in Massachusetts.

Quick Facts

Distance: 4.8 miles, out-and-back
Time to Complete: Half day for most
Difficulty: ★★
Scenery:★★★★


Season: Year-round. Best from May through October
Fees/Permits: None.
Contact: https://www.mass.gov/locations/mount-greylock-state-reservation

Download

Turn-By-Turn

To access the Thunderbolt trailhead, hikers can park in nearly adjacent lots on Thiel Road and Gould Road in Adams, Massachusetts. To get there from North Adams, the major jumping-off point for anybody heading to Greylock, take Route 8 south for about two miles, and then, make a right onto Friend Street at a rotary. After a mile, Friend Street merges into Notch Road. About 0.5 miles later, turn right onto Gould Street, and then, either continue straight for side-of-the-road parking on Thiel Road or make a quick left into the signed hiker parking lot on Gould Road.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Into the Woods

From either lot, finding the right trail is tricky. There’s a maze of intersecting trails in and around the parking lots, and the way to Thunderbolt is not always clearly marked.

For the easiest route, hike for roughly 10 minutes up the closed (to vehicles) section of Thiel Road, first on pavement and then on a gravel path, until you come to a sign (42.627598, -73.137497) directing hikers to Thunderbolt.

From the sign, navigation is still a bit strenuous, with the narrow trail winding through thick woods and dense ferns. Enjoy this short section, as it easily picks up elevation. You’ll soon approach the ski trail proper, (42.636150, -73.137497) where the trail opens up and the grade intensifies.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

The Ski Trail

The Thunderbolt foot trail ascends along the side of the Thunderbolt Ski Trail, and it’s easy to know when you’ve reached its base. Here, the dense forest immediately transitions into a wide, open swath of green running straight up the mountain. The Thunderbolt Ski Trail climbs consistently, with few interruptions—among them, the juncture with the Bellows Pipe Trail (42.637295, -73.154152) and the intersection with the Appalachian Trail (42.642410, -73.161797).

That said, the footing is good, the path is easy to follow, and there are a good number of rest spots where the trail briefly levels out. When you need to catch your breath, make sure to turn around and enjoy the view back east, with Adams in the foreground and the Hoosac Range on the horizon.

Pro Tip: Although lots of trails intersect with the Thunderbolt trail and many of the junctions aren’t signed, knowing that you should be hugging the ski trail makes it harder to get off route.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Joining the AT

After one final steep section, Thunderbolt levels out briefly before intersecting with the Appalachian Trail. Before ascending to the junction, make sure to pause to appreciate the spectacular view to the northeast. You’ll know you’re there when you see the first aid cache in the woods to climber’s right.

At the junction, follow the Appalachian Trail’s white blazes south another half-mile to the summit. The going is easy and relaxed, with only a slight incline. After a few minutes, hikers will cross the auto road, and then, spill into one of Greylock’s tourist parking lots.

Upon entering the lot, look to the right for the Thunderbolt shelter (42.638737, -73.0145218), an impressive stone warming hut built by members of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) in 1934. Originally intended as a place for ski racers to warm up and prepare for their run—remember, back then, racers had to get to the top of the run via their own power—the hut is dedicated to Rudolph Konieczny, a soldier killed in action while fighting with the 10th Mountain Division’s ski troop in northern Italy in 1945. Although, today, the shelter is primarily a tourist attraction and an emergency shelter for winter travelers, it is one of the summit’s several somber memorials.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

The Summit

From the hut, the actual summit is only a short jaunt away. Simply rejoin the Appalachian Trail and follow the gravel, and then paved, path a bit farther south. Pretty soon, you’ll be on the summit proper (42.636898, -73.165527), which, in 1898, became the centerpiece of the first state park in Massachusetts.

As you approach the summit, Greylock’s 93-foot granite memorial to the Commonwealth’s war veterans—built by the CCC in the 1930s—looms overhead. If it’s open, make sure to go in to pay your respects. Then, climb the tower’s spiral staircase to a viewing observatory, which offers 360-degree views of the region. To the north, look for North Adams in the foreground and New York’s Adirondacks and Vermont’s Green Mountains in the distance. Looking east, mountains and hills are everywhere; try to pick out Mount Monadnock in southern New Hampshire. Turning south and west, you’ll see the Berkshires, the Catskills, and the Hudson River Valley.

There are a lot of other things to do on the summit. In addition to the Thunderbolt Ski Hut, there’s the Bascom Lodge. Perched nearly on Greylock’s summit, the lodge is another minute south on the AT. Made using local schist and red spruce, the lodge was built in the 1930s by the CCC to offer shelter to summit visitors. Today, it features a restaurant and cafe, provides seasonal accommodations, and is even available for weddings and private events. Whether you’re grabbing a meal inside or having a snack at the nearby picnic tables, the Bascom Lodge is the perfect place to linger on the summit.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Return

To return to your car from the summit, simply retrace your steps back down the way you came. Of course, as you pass by signs noting iconic sections of the Thunderbolt Ski Trail, such as Big Bend, Big Schuss, and The Bumps, try not to get too distracted thinking about how much more fun (and faster) it would be on skis.

If you didn’t know, the Thunderbolt Trail was originally built as a ski trail (also by the CCC) and is rich with New England ski history. For example, Dick Durrance, the 17-time national champion ski racer who won the first race held on the Thunderbolt Trail in 1935, descended in just two minutes and 48 seconds—a time that feels especially fast to hikers anxious to get back to their cars.

It’s also worth noting that, while the Thunderbolt Trail is open to hikers all year, winter hikers are encouraged to ascend where others already have to preserve the snow for skiers.

The Cheat Route

If you have someone who would like to experience Mount Greylock’s summit with you but is unable to ascend the approximately 2,200 feet of elevation over roughly 2.5 miles, have them meet you at the top. The Greylock auto road allows cars to drive to the summit from May through October. Just know there’s a small fee to park at the summit.


Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

The Kit

  • Saying the Thunderbolt Trail is steep feels like an understatement, especially considering that, at its steepest, the trail pitches to 38 degrees. Make ascending and descending a little bit easier by bringing a pair of trekking poles.
  • Plan for your trip up and ensure you stay on track with the Mount Greylock Reservation Map. Mount Greylock State Reservation has over 12,000 acres and is home to roughly 50 miles of trails, so there’s plenty left to do after your successful summit.
  • While the origins of the Greylock name are up for debate, one popular theory is, it refers to the mountain’s appearance. Often, it has a gray cloud—or lock of gray mist—overhead. This has certainly been our experience, so don’t forget to pack a raincoat (men’s/women’s) for the summit.
  • 360-degree views and plenty of places to avoid inclement weather make for an unrushed experience on the summit. Treat yourself by bringing something warm to eat in the winter, or cool for the summer with a Hydro Flask Food Flask.
  • With so many steep pitches ahead of you, having a good-fitting pair of performance socks is critical for avoiding blisters. Pick a pair made from a wicking material, such as merino wool, to keep your feet happy.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Keys to the Trip

  • Before heading to the mountain, get some local knowledge at the staffed Visitors Center in Lanesborough, which is open all year.
  • Spend the night at one of Mount Greylock’s 18 tent sites, or in one of the five lean-tos found on the mountain. Learn more here.
  • Looking to grab a pint and absorb a little culture? Bright Ideas Brewing serves delicious brews and is located in the courtyard of the Mass Museum of Contemporary Art (Mass MoCA).
  • Dogs are welcome to hike Mount Greylock’s trails, as long as they’re leashed and attended. However, if you had to leave Fido home and are missing man’s best friend, stop by the Museum of Dog (M.O.D.). Located just down the street from Mass MoCA, M.O.D. features more than 180 pieces from roughly 50 notable, dog-loving artists. Ironically, dogs are not allowed inside M.O.D.
  • Visit the Thunderbolt Ski Museum in the Adams Visitor Center to learn more about the history of this storied ski run.

Current Conditions

Have you hiked Mount Greylock recently? Post your experience and the conditions (with the date of your climb) in the comments for others!


Why Should I Hike New Hampshire's "52 With A View"?

Just how big of a draw are New Hampshire’s 4,000-footers? As one clear indication, look no further than the parking situation in Franconia Notch. Drive through the Notch on almost any weekend, and you’ll notice the vast number of cars parked along the highway. This isn’t unique to Franconia Notch, however. Trailheads for popular 4,000-footers are routinely teaming with list-obsessed hikers, ourselves included.

Yet, unbeknownst to many, there’s another excellent New Hampshire hiking list—the “52 With a View” (52 WaV). Broad geographic diversity, options for every ability level, and some of the state’s most scenic views make it a must-do. Here’s why you should check them out on your next hike.

Mount Avalon. | Credit: Tim Peck
Mount Avalon. | Credit: Tim Peck

History of the 52 WaV

In 1990, a group called the Over the Hill Hikers started the 52-With-a-View Club as a way to draw attention to New Hampshire’s mountains that don’t reach the magical 4,000-foot mark. Ranging from just over 2,500 feet in elevation to just under 4,000 feet, every one on the 52 WaV list delivers a stunning view, either on the way to or from the summit. As well, encouraging hikers to explore these under-4,000 footers reduces the pressure on some of New Hampshire’s most important natural resources.

Picture-Perfect Peaks

There is something to appreciate on every summit, whether it’s a feeling of accomplishment or a prime perspective. While all of New Hampshire’s 4,000-footers deliver a physical test, many come up short when it comes to views. Owl’s Head, Waumbek, Galehead, Hale, and Field all jump to mind, while Tecumseh, South Hancock, and Passaconaway offer limited views at best. Unlike these mountains, every one on the 52 WaV list delivers an amazing view. And, depending upon which peak you visit, the sights may be far superior to what you’ll see from some 4,000-footers.

Geographic Diversity

While New Hampshire’s 4,000-footers are all located in the same part of the state, the 52 WaV list offers greater geographical diversity. Firstly, this helps get you away from the crowds bagging 4,000-footers. Secondly, it’s an excuse to explore other parts of New Hampshire. And, depending upon where you’re coming from, you may even spend less time in the car.

In Southern New Hampshire, Mount Monadnock and Mount Kearsarge stand out. Mount Shaw and Mount Roberts are Lakes Region highlights. In Western New Hampshire, Mount Cardigan and Mount Cube are fantastic hikes. Northern New Hampshire is home to Eagle Crag, Mount Hayes, and Mount Success—which, by its name alone, you should save for last. And, around the Conway area are the Moats, Mount Chocorua, and the other Mount Kearsarge, also known as Kearsarge North.

Middle Sugarloaf. | Credit: Doug Martland
Middle Sugarloaf. | Credit: Doug Martland

Varying Difficulties

Even the easiest-to-summit 4,000-footers require hiking a fair amount of mileage and entail considerable elevation gain. Although the 52 WaV list has some challenging hikes—for example, Sandwich Mountain (sometimes called Sandwich Dome) is as hard as, if not harder than, many 4,000-footers—many are great for first-time hikers or for bringing the family along. Hikes like Mount Willard, Mount Pemigewasset, the Sugarloafs, Hedgehog, and Welch-Dickey let you explore the Whites without the elevation gain, challenging terrain, and time commitment.

Forecasting Fun

Lower elevations and shorter mileage make the 52 WaV peaks a good backup whenever bad weather and high winds are buffeting the higher summits. Likewise, many of these shorter peaks are great starter trips for those new to winter hiking.

Monadnock's Ridge. | Credit: Tim Peck
Monadnock’s Ridge. | Credit: Tim Peck

Add On

Depending on how much you’ve accomplished in the Whites, the 52 With a View can be everything from a great starting point to something entirely new. For those who have already completed the New Hampshire 4,000-footers and are looking for something different, this list is an awesome alternative. Even if you’re working on the NH48, a handful of the 52 WaV can easily be tied into bigger trips. For instance, include Avalon on a hike across Willey, Field, and Tom, and the majority who summit Mount Waumbek first cross over the top of Starr King.

Type-A Fun on the B List

For super-ambitious, Type-A personalities, many of the 52 WaV can be hiked in the same day, thanks to their shorter mileage. And, Redliners will need to cross many of these peaks, as the trails leading to them are in the AMC’s White Mountain Guide.


The List

# Mountain Elevation in feet
1 Sandwich Mountain 3960
2 Mount Webster 3910
3 Mount Starr King 3907
4 The Horn 3905
5 Shelburne Moriah Mountain 3735
6 Sugarloaf Mountain 3700
7 North Baldface 3600
8 Mount Success 3565
9 South Baldface 3560
10 Mount Chocorua 3480
11 Stairs Mountain 3468
12 Jennings Peak 3440
13 Mount Avalon 3440
14 Percy Peaks, North Peak 3420
15 Mount Resolution 3415
16 Magalloway Mountain 3383
17 Mount Tremont 3371
18 Three Sisters 3354
19 Kearsarge North (Chatham, NH) 3268
20 Mount Martha (Cherry Mtn / Owl’s Head) 3248
21 Smarts Mountain 3238
22 West Royce Mountain 3200
23 Mount Paugus 3198
24 North Moat Mountain 3196
25 Imp Face 3165
26 Mount Monadnock 3165
27 Mount Cardigan 3155
28 Mount Crawford 3119
29 North Doublehead 3053
30 Mount Parker 3004
31 Mount Shaw 2990
32 Eastman Mountain 2939
33 Kearsarge Mountain (Warner, NH) 2937
34 Mount Hibbard 2920
35 Mount Cube 2909
36 Stinson Mountain 2900
37 Mount Willard 2865
38 Black Mountain (Benton, NH) 2830
39 Eagle Crag / Mount Meader 2782
40 South Moat Mountain 2760
41 Black Mountain, Middle Peak 2757
42 Dickey Mountain / Welch Mountain 2734 / 2605
43 Iorn Mountain 2726
44 Potash Mountain 2680
45 Blueberry Mountain 2662
46 Mount Israel 2620
47 Square Ledge 2600
48 Mount Roberts 2582
49 Mount Pemigewasset 2557
50 Mount Hayes 2555
51 Middle Sugarloaf 2539
52 Hedgehog Mountain 2532

If you have a favorite on the 52 With a View list, we want to hear about it. Leave a comment telling us which one you love and why somebody should visit it!


How to Choose a Climbing Rope

Whether you’re new or a seasoned sender, the process of buying a climbing rope is surprisingly confusing. Multiple styles, various widths and lengths, and other features make it difficult to know where to even start. While they’re versatile, knowing what you plan to do with your rope and what you’re looking for narrow down the choices and help tailor your purchase.
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Dynamic or Static?

Climbing uses two kinds of ropes: dynamic and static. The former is used for belaying the climber (i.e., holding a climber who falls), while static ropes are designed for anchors and hauling. To “hold a fall,” these ropes stretch when weighted. Elongation then dissipates the fall’s energy and reduces the force placed on the climber and their gear. This process dramatically reduces the potential for injury or catastrophic failure of anchors and gear. Unlike dynamic ropes, however, static options stretch very little, making them ideal for building anchors but dangerous to climb on.

GO: Dynamic | Static

Elongation

The UIAA’s two measurements—dynamic and static elongation—indicate how much a rope will stretch. Dynamic elongation is how much a rope stretches during its first UIAA fall. More elongation means a longer fall, but also less force exerted on gear and the climber. The maximum amount of dynamic elongation allowed by the UIAA is 40 percent.

Static elongation measures how much the rope stretches with an 80kg weight hanging from it. The maximum amount of stretch allowed for single and twin ropes is 10 percent, while half ropes can stretch 12 percent.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Single, Double, or Half?

Single

Climbing article assetThe most common type, single ropes are easily identified by the “1” marked in a circle on their ends. That simply means, when you’re climbing, you only need that one rope.

Thanks to their incredible versatility, they are the logical choice for almost every application. Indeed, they are used in all manners of climbing—top rope, sport, trad, multi-pitch, ice, and mountaineering. First-time rope buyers, take note!

Single ropes, however, are not perfect for every application. So, if you’re planning on doing long multi-pitch climbs like Lost in the Sun (which has seven 60-meter rappels) or just really enjoy pitches that wander, a two-rope system might be a more suitable choice.

Twin

With a circled infinity symbol (∞) on their ends, twin ropes are the simplest of the two-rope systems to use. Designed to be used as a pair and clipped simultaneously for protection, they offer multi-pitch rock and ice climbers two main advantages. First, they add redundancy to the system, as the leader is attached to two (as opposed to one) ropes. Second, in contrast to single ropes, where a climber can only rappel half the rope’s length, the two ropes allow climbers to make full-length rappels. Because you climb with two, they are typically narrower in diameter than a single rope.

Twin ropes, however, are still susceptible to rope drag on wandering routes. As well, they may complicate rope management at belay stations—something that can be particularly challenging for newer climbers.

Half

Half ropes—sometimes called double ropes—are the other two-rope system. The main difference is, unlike twin ropes, they are clipped to alternating pieces of protection. If this is done correctly, half ropes reduce drag on wandering routes. Because they are clipped independently of one another, half ropes also lessen the force a fall puts on protection. For this reason, they’re a favorite of climbers operating on delicate mediums, such as an ice formation. For identification, a “½” mark is added to their ends.

GO: Single Ropes | Twin RopesHalf Ropes

If all of these options sound appealing to you, you’re in luck! Rope construction and technologies are improving so rapidly that manufacturers can construct one that meets the standards for two, and sometimes all three (e.g., the Sterling Nano), of the aforementioned categories. If in doubt about a rope’s intended use, simply check the rope tag—located on both ends—and look for the corresponding symbol.

EMS-Burlington-0707

Diameter and Weight

Rope diameters range from less than 8mm to more than 10.5mm. Traditionally, single ropes are wider (9.0 to 10.5mm) than twin and half ropes (7.8 to 9.0mm). In general, thicker ropes are heavier and more durable, and skinnier ones are lighter and less durable. For this reason, thicker ropes are typically used for activities like top roping, and skinnier ropes are better for sport climbing. Climbers looking for one rope to do it all will be happy with a rope ranging from mid-9mm to low-10mm, as they offer a good blend of performance and robustness.

Because the way rope manufacturers measure the diameter isn’t standard—for example, some are measured under slight tension—the rope’s weight can help paint a clearer picture of its intended use. Heavier ropes tend to be built for longevity, while lighter ones are constructed with performance in mind.

Length

Ropes today come in a wide range of sizes. You’ve got gym-friendly 35-meter lengths to pitch-stretching 80-meter monsters. As a general matter, 60 meters is the most common, and will work at the majority of crags for everything from top-roping to ice climbing. That said, due to the recent trend of developers putting up longer sport routes and rope weights falling dramatically over the last 15 years, 70 is quickly becoming the new 60. A good recommendation is, be familiar with standard pitch lengths at your crag and purchase accordingly.

As leading in the gym has grown in popularity, ropes shorter than 60 meters have, too. They offer a more affordable (and more transportable) option, but if you take these ropes outside, be extra cautious and confirm the rope will be long enough for the route. Don’t be the fool who lowers your climbing partner off the end of a too-short rope!

GO: Under 50 meters | 50 meters | 60 meters | 70 meters

EMS-Winter-Hiking-1316

Dry Treatment

Ropes lose a considerable amount of their strength when wet. Furthermore, a wet rope weighs significantly more than a dry one. Because of this, most ropes come with the option of a dry treatment. More expensive than their non-treated counterparts, dry-treated ropes are favored by ice climbers and mountaineers for obvious reasons. But, dry-treated ropes offer a host of advantages for most climbers. Particularly, a dry treatment decreases rope drag and helps ropes run smoother through gear. More importantly, the same treatment that keeps your rope from absorbing water also helps to keep dirt out of your rope, thus extending its lifespan.

Dry ropes come in three forms: ropes with dry-treated sheaths, ropes with dry-treated cores, and ropes with dry-treated sheaths and cores. Treating the sheath (i.e., the rope’s outer shell) helps repel water, reduces the rope’s friction on the rock (thereby reducing abrasion), and gives the rope a nice slick feel and handle. For the core, dry-treating reduces the amount of water a rope will absorb and also reduces the likelihood of dirt and grime working its way into the core, the rope’s most important part. Dry-treating both the sheath and core combines the two treatments and offers the most water protection. However, it is also the most expensive and perhaps best reserved for ice climbing, mountaineering, and other climbing done in wet conditions.

EMS-LAKE-PLACID-3613

Middle Marker

Middle markers aid in a wide variety of ways, such as indicating it’s safe to lower a climber to ease in threading rappels. Most ropes today feature some kind middle-mark indicator—with features such as changing patterns, a distinctive mark, or a special weave to highlight a rope’s midpoint. Bi-color ropes offer the clearest indication, but also tend to be the most expensive. Ropes with colored middles offer a cost-effective solution, but the color can fade with use, and the middle mark can be difficult to see in fading light.

UIAA Fall Rating

The United International Climbing and Mountaineering Federation (UIAA) tests climbing ropes to see how many falls they can hold before failing. For single ropes, the test involves dropping an 80kg weight on the rope. With twin ropes, 80kg is used for both ropes. For half ropes, a 55kg weight is dropped onto a single strand. Single and half ropes must withstand a minimum of five falls, and twin ropes 12. Any rope that meets the UIAA fall standard is considered safe for climbing.

As a note, the lab tests subject ropes to more force than they’ll likely encounter in a real-world scenario. More so, the outdoors subjects ropes to hazards like sharp edges and worn fixed draws. So, get in the habit of inspecting your rope, especially if you’ve taken a big whipper.

EMS-Burlington-0412

So, Which Rope Should I Get?

Although most ropes are pretty versatile, here’s a quick breakdown by activity:

Multi-pitch ice climbing: You want a rope that is long, skinny, and dry treated. Consider half and twin ropes—or, even better, ropes that rate as single, twin, and half—if your ideal routes involve long approaches and rappels, or if you’ll often be climbing as a party of three.

Top-rope cragging: Pack a beefy, durable single rope in the low-10mm range.

Sport climbing: For clipping bolts, a 60- or 70-meter single rope of medium diameter (9.4-9.8mm) is ideal.

For multi-pitch rock climbing: Bring a 60- or 70-meter rope of medium diameter (9.4-9.8mm). As with ice climbing, consider half and twin ropes—or ropes that rate as single, twin, and half—if your ideal routes involve long approaches and rappels, or if you’ll often be climbing as a party of three.


9 Unbeatable Speed Records in the Northeast

By now, you’ve probably heard the news. On June 4th, Alex Honnold and Tommy Caldwell broke the speed record on The Nose of El Capitan in Yosemite National Park. Then, the very next day, the duo returned and broke their day-old record, taking their time under the two-hour mark (1:58:07).

Although the Northeast isn’t known for its speed climbing, it is home to numerous speed records involving the region’s mountainous terrain. With the Guinness Book on our minds, here’s a snapshot of some of the Northeast’s most-coveted FKTs (fastest-known times).

Editor’s Note: Records are current as of July 22, 2018.

Peakbaggers

NH48

For many New England hikers, summiting all of New Hampshire’s 48 mountains over 4,000-feet tall is the culmination of a lifetime goal. For others, like Andrew Thompson, owner of the fastest-known time on the NH48, it’s a good long weekend. It took him just three days, 14 hours, and 59 minutes—an incredibly fast time to cover the roughly 200 miles and 66,000 feet of vertical gain!

Adirondacks

The ADK46ers list shows that over 10,000 people have summited the region’s 46 High Peaks. In fact, the first known record dates back to the 1920s. That being said, none have done it faster than Jan Wellford. In June 2008, he picked them off in a staggeringly speedy time of three days, 17 hours, and 14 minutes.

Catskills

Although the Catskills might not have as many peaks over 4,000 feet, achieving the fastest-known time for summiting its high peaks—35 summits over 3,500 feet in elevation—is uniquely challenging. Unlike with the NH48 and ADK46, this sought-after FKT takes a single route through the Catskills, with no car shuttling between trailheads. Approximately 140 miles long, with around 38,500 feet of vertical ascent, the route covers roughly 80 miles of trail, 40 miles of bushwhacking, and 20 miles of pavement-pounding. Amazingly, in May 2018, Mike Siudy blazed it all in a breathtakingly breakneck time of two days, nine hours, and 16 minutes.

Classic Routes

Long Trail

For most backpackers, a trip along Vermont’s Long Trail is a three- to four-week endeavor. For fastest-known time-holder Jonathan Basham, it’s a good way to spend a week off, as it leaves a few days free to explore Burlington or take the Ben & Jerry’s Factory tour. Basham covered the 273 miles from the Canadian border to Massachusetts in an astoundingly fast four days, 12 hours, and 46 minutes in September 2009.

Presidential Traverse

A hike across the White Mountains’ Presidential Range, the iconic Presidential Traverse is a bucket-list trip for many Northeastern hikers. For others, like FKT holder Ben Thompson, this classic route is something to do before lunch. Ben blazed across the Presidential Traverse’s 18-plus miles and almost 9,000 feet of vertical gain in four hours, 14 minutes, and 59 seconds.

Yesterday I took the day off work to witness something incredible. Ben Thompson set a new Fastest Known Time on the Pemi Loop in an absurd 6:06:53. Here’s a picture of him cresting Mt. Truman with Lafayette in the background. … I hung out on the ridge to witness the attempt and was absolutely astonished at his speed and fluidity as he descended Lafayette, four hours in and just after a huge climb, he absolutely flew by. Congratulations Ben, what an effort! … (The Pemi is a 30 mile loop with roughly 10,000 feet of vert over technical mountain terrain, For context, I’m not in horrible shape and it recently took me a little over 12 hours) … #pemiloop #fkt #fastestknowntime #franconianotch #franconiaridge #mtlafayette #nh #inov8 #ultimatedirection

A post shared by Rob Blakemore (@rjayblake) on

Pemi Loop

The Whites are also home to another highly coveted route, the Pemigewasset Loop, or simply the Pemi Loop—one of the region’s most popular backpacking trips. The record holders have finished in time to make happy hour at the Woodstock Inn, Station & Brewery. FKT competitors can choose to do the route—more than 30 miles and over 9,000 feet of elevation gain—in either direction. This is one of the most competitive records in the White Mountains, and impressively, Presidential Traverse record holder Ben Thompson also owns this one. He completed it with a zippy time of six hours, six minutes, and 53 seconds in September 2017.

THE TRAIL: The Appalachian Trail covers 2,189 miles from Springer Mountain in Georgia to Mt Katahdin in Maine. The total elevation gain over that stretch is ~464,000 ft, or the equivalent of 16 Mt Everests. It passes through 14 states and is constantly marked with white blazes that you see in the picture. The trail itself is overseen by the @appalachiantrail @nationalparkservice and @u.s.forestservice, and regionally maintained by thousands of volunteers and local hiking clubs. I found the trail quite quirky, flat farmlands in one section, boulder climbs in another. You’ll meet some amazing people and see all different kinds of small town America. Our nations past is intertwined in historic sections in Maryland and West Virginia. Maine, New Hampshire and Vermud will kick your butt but astound you with views. My perception of states like Georgia and New Jersey are forever changed – surprising me with their beauty and ruggedness. 2-3 million people each year hike some part of the trail, hopefully you will be one of those people 😁

A post shared by Joe McConaughy (@thestring.bean) on

Appalachian Trail

Perhaps the most competitive speed record is the iconic Appalachian Trail (AT), the renowned footpath that starts at Springer Mountain in Georgia and ends at Maine’s Mount Katahdin. In recent years, some of the world’s most well-known ultra runners—such as seven-time Western States winner Scott Jurek and five-time Hardrock winner Karl Meltzer—have held the FKT on this roughly 2,200-mile trail. Currently, though, Joe “Stringbean” McConaughy holds the record. Self-supported, he cruised its full length in just 45 days, 12 hours, and 15 minutes.

Pacific Crest Trail

Coincidentally, McConaughy also holds the FKT on the Pacific Crest Trail—the AT’s West Coast cousin. However, his bicoastal record might not last long. Currently, Cincinnati teacher Harvey Lewis is putting in a strong effort to beat Stringbean’s AT time.

Shortish and Sweet

Just outside Boston, the Blue Hills’ Skyline Trail is a worthy goal for time-crunched runners and hikers. Roughly 15 miles out and back with over 3,500 feet of elevation gain, its challenges are on par with the region’s larger ranges. Fastest-known time-holder Ben Nephew—a Top 5 holder on many of the region’s other classic routes—rapidly dispatched this one in two hours, 25 minutes, and 44 seconds—fast enough to do it before work.

Another awesome out-and-back goes up and over Cadillac Mountain’s iconic North Ridge and South Ridge Trails. This 12-mile trip climbs almost 3,000 vertical feet along Maine’s rocky shoreline and affords incredible ocean views. Fastest-known time holder Tony Dalisio completed the route in one hour, 48 minutes, and 44 seconds. He partially attributes his tremendously fast time to doing the trip in April, thus avoiding tourists, the route’s biggest obstacle.

It only makes sense that the second-most hiked mountain in the world—Mount Monadnock—would have some seriously fast ascents. What is shocking is how long the speed record up the mountain’s most popular trail—White Dot—has stood. Since 2001, Elijah Barrett has held the fastest-known time, having made it to the summit in 24 minutes and 44 seconds.

Of course, we’ve listed just some of the better-known objectives and their record-setting times. To learn more about the records in your region, the Fastest Known Time website is a great resource. And, if you’re planning on doing one of these routes this summer, we want to hear about it—even if it isn’t record setting. So, tell us about your trip in the comments.


What is a Lumen? Shining a Light on Headlamps

Choosing the right headlamp can be daunting. From a wall full of lights that all look similar, covered in numbers that mean next to nothing, how do you pick the right one? To begin, understanding the lumen is the first step toward getting what you need. But, there’s more to know if you want to have the perfect headlamp for your next adventure.

So…what is it?

A lumen is the technical measurement of the amount of light emitted in all directions by a light source. More simply, a lumens rating indicates how bright a headlamp will shine with a fully charged battery. The more lumens a light has, the brighter it is.

Headlamps and other lights run the gamut of brightness. You’ll find anything from the 30-lumen, kid-friendly Black Diamond Wiz to the ultra-powerful, 750-lumen Petzl NAO+. The great thing about these headlamps is, they all have enough lumens for general use. Even those with the lowest lumen count provide enough illumination for an evening stroll around the campsite or a storm-bound day spent in the tent reading.

EMS - BIG SUR -1934-Camping

How many lumens do I need?

But, for other activities, you might need more lumens. So, how many should you get? The answer to that question is activity dependent. For movement-based activities, like night hiking or backpacking, a headlamp with a minimum of 150 to 200 lumens is best. There are exceptions, of course, like hiking the Presidential Range under a supermoon.

For faster-paced activities when you need to see farther ahead so you don’t trip (think nighttime trail-running), a light with more than 250 lumens is ideal. And, for activities like alpine climbing and mountaineering, when you might need a really bright light to briefly scope the next pitch or skirt some sketchy terrain, a lamp with a super-bright option (e.g., more than 350 lumens) will be really useful.

Most major manufacturers list a headlamp’s lumens on its package. It’s worth noting, however, that the majority will only be able to reach that number with fully charged batteries. More so, the higher power at which you operate your headlamp, the more battery power it consumes. Thus, it may make more sense to use a lower brightness to conserve battery life, rather than operate at the full 300 lumens.

Does the ability to adjust brightness interest you? To begin, make sure to check out the lights in Petzl’s Active series, like the Petzl Actik Core. A few Black Diamond models fall into this group, including the Icon and ReVolt.

EMS-Winter-Camp-Kitchen-4122

So, lumen count is the only thing that matters. Right?

All that said, lumen count isn’t the be-all, end-all. It’s also important to consider how the headlamp directs the lumens. Generally referred to as the headlamp’s “beam,” the focusing of the lumens—from pinpoint to diffuse—greatly influences the activities for which the headlamp is ideal.

Types of Beams

A good example of a “general use” model is the 300-lumen Petzl Actik, which lets you toggle between wide and regular beams. Toggling makes the Actik ideal for use around the campsite, where the regular beam is perfect for precision tasks like cooking. The wide beam, meanwhile, is key for navigating around a site without blinding your fellow campers.

Alternately, a headlamp like the 300-lumen Black Diamond Spot has a more focused beam. Thus, it’s ideal for people doing precision work in the dark. Threading rappel anchors after being benighted, checking a climbing partner’s knot before an alpine start, and searching your pack for a midnight snack are all occasions where you benefit from a focused beam.

Some headlamps, such as the Black Diamond Sprinter—built for runners—are engineered to excel at one specific task. The Sprinter uses neither a wide, diffused light nor a concentrated proximity light. Rather, it produces a strong oval beam that is bright enough to illuminate potential hazards on the road or the trail, and shines far enough ahead so that you can anticipate upcoming terrain.

Reactive Lighting

A clear sign of just how far headlamps have advanced in recent years is Petzl’s reactive light technology. These advanced headlamps, like the Petzl Reactik, use a sensor to analyze the amount of ambient light in your environment, and adjust the brightness accordingly. This feature is particularly useful: It ensures you’re receiving just the right amount of light, it uses the headlamp’s battery as efficiently as possible, and it reduces any fiddling with buttons or dials. You can even control the Reactik’s settings via an app to prioritize everything from battery power to brightness.

Courtesy: Black Diamond
Courtesy: Black Diamond

Out Like a Light

The best thing about buying a headlamp at EMS is that there are no bad choices. Almost every model found on our shelves will provide enough lumens for whatever task you ask of it. And, for those looking for a headlamp to perform in a specific instance, manufacturers are rising to the occasion to fill those niches.


Alpha Guide: Day Hiking Mount Washington

 

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The region’s tallest peak, Mount Washington is a prize of the Northeast and one that can be climbed over and over by numerous different routes. 

A long and notable history, the distinction of being New Hampshire’s tallest peak, and a reputation for being the “home of the world’s worst weather” are just a few reasons Mount Washington tops many peakbaggers’ lists. And, with routes varying from serene to scary, there are plenty of different paths to the peak.

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Turn-By-Turn

Most Mount Washington day hikes start on either the east or west side. For starting on the east side with the Tuckerman Ravine Trail, Lion Head, or Boott Spur, hikers should park at the Appalachian Mountain Club’s Pinkham Notch Visitor Center in Gorham, just north of Jackson on Route 16. It’s about a 25-minute drive from North Conway to Gorham.

For a west side hike, such as the Ammonoosuc Ravine and Jewell Trails, hikers should park at the Ammonoosuc Ravine Trailhead. From Route 302, turn onto Base Road at the intersection of Bretton Woods and Fabyan’s Restaurant. The parking lot is on the right, several miles down the road. Confused? Just follow the signs for the Mount Washington Cog Railway.

Pro Tip: Get an early start. On most weekends, the lots at Pinkham Notch and the Ammonoosuc Trailhead fill up quickly. For Pinkham, there’s overflow parking just south of the Visitor Center and additional parking on the street.

The summit from the top of Tuckerman Ravine. | Credit: Tim Peck
The summit from the top of Tuckerman Ravine. | Credit: Tim Peck

East Side Trails

Tuckerman Ravine Trail

Quick Facts

Distance: 8.2 miles, round trip.
Time to Complete: 1 day
Difficulty:★★★
Scenery:★★★★


Season: May through October.
Fees/Permits: None
Contact: https://www.fs.usda.gov/recarea/whitemountain/recarea?recid=78538

Of all the routes to the summit, an ascent via the 4.1-mile, one-way Tuckerman Ravine Trail is perhaps the most sought after, as it climbs directly up the notorious glacial cirque and backcountry ski destination. Because snow and ice may cover the terrain from late fall to early summer—making it more of a mountaineering route than a hike—and due to its popularity, this trail may be busy when in prime condition.

Starting just behind the Pinkham Notch Visitor Center, the Tuckerman Ravine Trail begins rather benignly. The wide-yet-rocky trail gradually works its way up the roughly 2.5 miles to Hermit Lake and the base of Tuckerman Ravine. As a note, this section may be particularly busy, as Hermit Lake is a popular destination itself. Above Hermit Lake, the trail climbs a series of narrow, steep, and often slippery switchbacks that deliver hikers to the top of the ravine.

From here, the tops of the summit buildings come into view, and it may seem like the difficulty is over. However, you still have a long way to go. Arguably, the final mile of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail is its most challenging, as it involves as much rock-hopping as it does hiking. As you near the top, the sounds of the Auto Road get increasingly louder, and eventually, the trail runs into the road. Here, hikers tackle the ascent’s final challenge: a steep staircase that deposits you near the summit sign. Because of the trail’s steep and slippery nature, hikers should descend via the Lion Head Trail.

Crossing the Alpine Garden. | Credit: Tim Peck
Crossing the Alpine Garden. | Credit: Tim Peck

Lion Head Trail

Quick Facts

Distance: 8.4 miles, round trip.
Time to Complete: 1 day
Difficulty:★★★
Scenery:★★★★


Season: May through October.
Fees/Permits: None

The Lion Head Trail is a popular alternative to the Tuckerman Ravine Trail. The trip offers hikers less exposure, gives you a bird’s-eye view of the ravine, and gets you to the peak when the Tuckerman Ravine Trail’s conditions aren’t ideal. The trip up actually follows the Tuckerman Ravine Trail for large portions; however, it veers off to skirt the ravine’s northern edge, rather than ascend directly up it. Commonly thought to be one of the “easier” routes to the summit, the Lion Head gains roughly 4,200 feet of elevation along its 4.2 miles, and is challenging for even seasoned hikers.

Before leaving home, make sure you know which version of the Lion Head Trail—Summer or Winter—is open by checking the Mount Washington Avalanche Center’s trail information. While both leave from the Tuckerman Ravine Trail, the Winter route branches off shortly before Hermit Lake, and the Summer route starts at Hermit Lake. The latter is less steep and a bit quicker than the former. However, it also crosses an avalanche path, and is only open when there is no possibility of the snow sliding. Want to learn more about the Lion Head in winter? Check out this goEast article about it.

Above treeline, the Lion Head Trail affords an incredible view of Tuckerman Ravine from its granite ledges—if the weather allows, that is. If the weather doesn’t cooperate, and especially if it’s windy, be careful. A good gust could blow an unsuspecting person into the ravine. Yes, the trail is that close to the ravine’s rim! The Lion Head Trail rejoins the Tuckerman Ravine Trail at a well-marked junction for the final 0.4 miles to Washington’s summit.

Looking down on the Boot Spur. | Credit: Tim Peck
Looking down on the Boott Spur. | Credit: Tim Peck

Boott Spur Trail

Quick Facts

Distance: 10.8 miles, round trip.
Time to Complete: 1 day
Difficulty:★★★
Scenery:★★★★


Season: May through October.
Fees/Permits: None

Looking for a little bit longer and less crowded hike up Washington’s east side? Check out the Boott Spur Trail, which climbs the ridge forming the southern side of Tuckerman Ravine. Once above treeline, hikers get spectacular views of Hermit Lake, Tuckerman Ravine, and, in the distance, Mount Washington’s summit cone as they ascend the steps of the Boott Spur, a 5,500-foot sub-peak of Mount Washington.

To access the Boott Spur Trail, hikers begin at Pinkham Notch and hike an easy 0.4 miles on the Tuckerman Ravine Trail. The Boott Spur Trail begins at a signed junction where the Tuckerman Ravine Trail makes a sharp right turn and begins climbing uphill. Hikers will quickly cross the John Sherburne Ski Trail and then climb forested terrain up the ridgeline. Above treeline, the trail summits Boott Spur and then traverses along the edge of Tuckerman Ravine, until it joins the Davis Path. From there, there’s approximately two miles of rock-hopping to the summit. Overall, climbing Washington via this route is 5.4 miles, with an elevation gain of 4,654 feet. And, since so much is above treeline, make sure to save it for a nice day.

The Pinnacle and the Huntington Ravine Trail. | Credit: Tim Peck
The Pinnacle and the Huntington Ravine Trail. | Credit: Tim Peck

Huntington Ravine Trail

Quick Facts

Distance: 4.5 miles, one way.
Time to Complete: 1 day
Difficulty:★★★★★
Scenery:★★★★


Season: May through October.
Fees/Permits: None

One of the White Mountains’ hardest and most dangerous trails, the Huntington Ravine Trail should only be attempted by experienced hikers who are comfortable with exposure. To get there, follow the Tuckerman Ravine Trail 1.3 miles to the junction with the Huntington Ravine Trail and then follow the trail 2.1 miles as it climbs 2,450 feet to the Alpine Garden. The trail initially climbs through forested terrain, before it reaches a junction with the Huntington Ravine Fire Road. It then enters Huntington Ravine, gradually transitioning from a trail to rock-hopping through the bottom of a huge open boulder field called “The Fan.” Navigating up, over, and around these boulders is fun and challenging.

After working through The Fan, continue on the Huntington Ravine Trail as it ascends steeply toward the top of the ravine. Some portions of the upper section require scrambling and rock climbing-like moves to ascend. These sequences have serious exposure and may be difficult to reverse if you get stuck or the weather deteriorates, so only attempt this route on nice days when the trail is dry. On a clear day, though, this section offers a fantastic perspective of the Huntington Ravine.

At 2.1 miles, the Huntington Ravine Trail exits the ravine and intersects with the Alpine Garden Trail. Hikers heading for the summit should continue on this moderate section for 0.3 miles until it ends at the Mount Washington Auto Road and the junction with the Nelson Crag Trail. From there, it’s 0.8 miles of rock-hopping on the Nelson Crag Trail to the summit.

Pro Tip: The Huntington Ravine Trail is hard enough to ascend. Don’t use it as your descent route.

Lake of the Clouds and Mount Madison from Washington's summit cone. | Credit: Tim Peck
Lakes of the Clouds and Mount Monroe from Washington’s summit cone. | Credit: Tim Peck

West Side Trails

Ammonoosuc Ravine Trail

Quick Facts

Distance: 9 miles, round trip.
Time to Complete: 1 day
Difficulty:★★★
Scenery:★★★★


Season: May through October.
Fees/Permits: Ammonoosuc Ravine Trailhead is $5 a day

The Ammonoosuc Ravine Trail (“The Ammo”) is the quickest route up to the Lakes of the Clouds Hut (3.1 miles) and a beautiful way to start a hike to the summit of Mount Washington (4.5 miles). The trail follows a crystal-clear stream up the ravine, eventually climbing steeply as it passes several waterfalls. A little way before Lakes of the Clouds, the trail pokes above treeline, crossing a series of open ledges to the hut. These ledges offer hikers fantastic views of Washington’s summit cone and back west, and are a great place to catch your breath.

At the hut, refill your water bottles, grab a snack (the hut crew’s baked goods are delicious), and enjoy the views. When you’ve recovered, take the Crawford Path 1.4 miles up Washington’s summit cone. This portion is above treeline and open to the elements, so before you head up, reassess the weather and layer up. If the weather is deteriorating or you’re just too tired, the summit of Mount Monroe is a relatively easy, 0.3-mile side hike in the opposite direction. The views are almost as good, and it’s a lot less crowded.

Pro Tip: With replenishment opportunities at the Lakes of the Clouds Hut and again on the summit proper, this is the route for hikers looking to carry a lighter pack.

Descenting the Gulfside Trail. | Credit: Tim Peck
Descending the Gulfside Trail. | Credit: Tim Peck

Jewell Trail

Quick Facts

Distance: 10.2 miles, round trip.
Time to Complete: 1 day
Difficulty:★★★
Scenery:★★★★


Season: May through October.
Fees/Permits: Ammonoosuc Ravine Trailhead is $5 a day

Another popular west-side route to Washington’s summit is the Jewell Trail to the Gulfside Trail. Although it’s a tad longer than the route via the Ammonoosuc Ravine (5.1 miles one way versus 4.5 miles) and has a little more climbing (4,000 feet of elevation gain versus 3,800 feet), overall it is a slightly easier route, as the Jewell Trail is neither as difficult nor as steep.

The Jewell Trail begins at a trailhead directly across the road from the Ammonoosuc Ravine parking lot and climbs gradually on moderate terrain (at least by Mount Washington standards) up an unnamed ridge on Mount Clay. Near treeline, the views dramatically improve, and the trail gets a little rockier as it nears the intersection with the Gulfside Trail at 5,400 feet.

From the junction, hikers have another 1.4 miles on the Gulfside Trail to Washington’s summit. After skirting Mount Clay, the Gulfside Trail hugs the upper rim of the Great Gulf, a massive east-facing glacial cirque framed by the summits of Washington, Clay, Jefferson, Adams, and Madison. Since it holds the Great Gulf Wilderness, New Hampshire’s smallest and oldest wilderness area, hikers should definitely stop to check it out.

The Gulfside Trail with the Northern Presidentials. | Credit: Tim Peck
The Gulfside Trail with the Northern Presidentials. | Credit: Tim Peck

Longer Options

If a simple ascent of Mount Washington isn’t challenging enough, you have numerous popular ways to incorporate summiting Mount Washington into larger hiking objectives. The most notable is the Presidential Traverse, the White Mountains’ classic point-to-point hike.

Of course, if a full Presidential Traverse seems too daunting, half Presidential Traverses are also popular. Typically, half Presidential Traverses start from the north (at Mount Madison) or the south (at Mount Jackson or Pierce), and hikers will work their way across the range, which culminates in an ascent of Mount Washington.

Another longer, more off-the-beaten path way is via the complete Davis Path. Originally built in 1845 as a bridle path, the Davis Path fell into neglect and disrepair before being re-opened as a footpath in 1910. Today, the Davis Path takes hikers roughly 14 miles over Mount Isolation, crossing over Boott Spur, and eventually joining the Crawford Path beneath Mount Washington’s summit.


Washington and Lake of the Clouds from Mount Monroe. | Credit: Tim Peck
Washington and Lakes of the Clouds from Mount Monroe. | Credit: Tim Peck

The Kit

  • It’s not uncommon for an ascent of Mount Washington to take longer than anticipated. So, bring a headlamp to avoid having to make a death-defying descent in the dark. We like the Black Diamond ReVolt.
  • Spending time on Mount Washington involves a lot of above-treeline hiking, which often leaves you exposed to the sun. The Black Diamond Alpenglow Sun Hoody (men’s/women’s) is an easy way to avoid getting sunburned on your trip.
  • Mount Washington has a well-deserved reputation for being “home to the world’s worst weather.” Prepare for the worst by bringing a lightweight insulated coat, like the EMS Feather Pack Down Jacket (men’s/women’s).
  • The record high temperature on Mount Washington’s summit is 72 degrees. Be prepared for a chilly summit by bringing a winter hat (we like the Smartwool NTS 250 Cuffed Beanie) and gloves (like the Black Diamond Midweight Windbloc Fleece), even on summer ascents.
  • A cold Coke and a slice of pizza from the summit’s cafeteria have saved more than one trip for us, so don’t forget to bring your wallet with cash. Keep your outdoor cred and distinguish yourself from those who drove up or took the train with The North Face Base Camp Wallet.
  • All of the trails on Mount Washington are rugged. Because of this, we always pack trekking poles, like the Black Diamond Distance FLZ (men’s/women’s), for added stability and to reduce the wear and tear on our joints.

The Gulfside Trail. | Credit: Tim Peck
The Gulfside Trail. | Credit: Tim Peck

Keys to the Trip

  • It’s easy to get disoriented on Mount Washington, especially above treeline. Get the Waterproof White Mountains Trail Map, study your route beforehand, and then bring it along—just in case.
  • After a big day on the Rockpile, east-side hikers can cool off with a cold pint from one of Barley & Salt’s 32 drafts on tap in North Conway, while west-side hikers can find cold brews at Fabyan’s Restaurant, conveniently located on the way back to Route 302.
  • Or, stop into a local store, and pick up a six pack of Tuckerman Brewing’s aptly named Rockpile IPA to celebrate when you get home.
  • Let your friends and family know about your successful summit by sending a postcard from the post office located on Mount Washington’s summit.
  • If you’re leaving from Pinkham Notch, make sure to sign the climbing register inside the visitor center, just in case something goes wrong.
  • Any trip to Mount Washington is going to be influenced by the weather. Check the Mount Washington Observatory’s Higher Summit Forecast to know what weather to expect, and read up on how to interpret their predictions.

Mount Washington's Summit. | Credit: Tim Peck
Mount Washington’s Summit. | Credit: Tim Peck

Current Conditions

Have you hiked Mount Washington recently? Which route did you use? Post your experience and the conditions (with the date of your climb) in the comments for others!


Rumney's Multi-Pitch Moderate Rock Climbs

Rumney has a well-deserved reputation as the best sport crag in the Northeast, thanks to its high-quality, single-pitch, bolted climbs at almost every grade. But, did you know that Rumney is also home to a handful of fun, moderate, multi-pitch sport climbs? Here’s a best-of list for almost every grade, along with tips for honing your multi-pitch skills.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Jimmy Cliff: Clip a Dee Doo Dah, 5.3

Don’t discount this remarkable route because of its modest grade. Clip a Dee Doo Dah delivers two pitches of fun slab climbing on surprisingly sticky stone leading to a cliff top with a breathtaking view of the Baker River. This route is so good, you’ll want to bring your approach shoes, so you can make quick time on the trail back to the base of the route and do it again!

Clip a Dee Doo Dah is well protected and a fantastic climb for newer leaders. With a two-bolt anchor and decent ledge atop the first pitch, it is also a great place for any climber to practice multi-pitch rope management. In particular, carefully consider where you build your master point and put your belay. Putting it too low may lead to exhausted elbows and a messy rope stack as you try to keep up with your partner charging up the route.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Jimmy Cliff: Lady and the Tramp, 5.4

Immediately to the climber’s right of Clip a Dee Doo Dah is Lady and the Tramp. It features the same stellar rock found on its popular neighbor, but it’s a little bit steeper and has a few bulges, with the most notable one being directly above the belay at the top of pitch one. It, too, is an excellent route for leaders new to multi-pitch climbing.

In terms of skill building, the route presents a great opportunity for recognizing the dangers of falling directly onto the belay. Particularly, watch out for the crux on the second pitch, located just above the first anchor and initially unprotected. Although a fall is unlikely, the consequences are significant. As such, get in the habit of clipping one of the anchor bolts before leaving the belay.

Speaking of belays, Clip a Dee Doo Dah and Lady and the Tramp share an anchor atop the second pitch. So, in case it’s occupied, bring a cordelette, so you can build your anchor on one of the many nearby trees. Bonus points for safely extending the anchor, so you can watch your second climb!

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Model Citizen, 5.6

Model Citizen is a great introduction to Rumney’s more vertical multi-pitch climbing. Featuring huge holds and interesting movement, the first pitch leads to a two-bolt anchor on a modestly sized belay ledge. More of the same type of climbing follows on pitch two. In fact, if you have a 70-meter rope, the two pitches can be combined into one monster-long pitch, albeit with the leader only being lowered to the anchor on the top of the first pitch.

A key for this route—and the others that follow—is that the top of the final pitch is not intended to be a belay station. Rather, the leader should build an anchor, clip the rope into it just like on a regular single-pitch sport climb, and then get lowered back to the first-pitch anchor. The second can then clean the route and anchor, before being lowered back to the first-pitch anchor. From there, the parties can do a single-rope rappel to the ground. Have questions about the best way to rappel? Check out tip 2 and the associated video in this goEast article.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Crowd Pleaser, 5.7

Another fantastic multi-pitch route, Crowd Pleaser begins a few feet to the right of Model Citizen in a left-facing corner. After an awkward first move or two, the route continues on good holds to an initial two-bolt anchor, for those wanting to top-rope the first pitch. Assuming you’re doing both, keep climbing just a little bit higher to the top of the first pitch. Here, there’s another two-bolt anchor with a nice ledge to belay from. The second pitch begins as low-angled slab before turning into fun, exposed climbing on the arete.

Pigtails, otherwise known as ramsheads, have been a popular option for equipping lower-offs in Europe for years. Inexpensive, robust, and easy to use, they are becoming a more common sight at Rumney, thanks to a grant from the American Alpine Club and the Access Fund. And, unlike other top anchors, they are certified and tested for use as a lower-off—a pigtail is rated to 18kN. Plus, they have no moving parts to wear out or rust.

Want to learn more about using the pigtails found at Rumney? Check out this fantastic video the Rumney Climbers Association published.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Tipping Point, 5.8

The hardest move on the first pitch of this juggy gem of a route might be the first one. So, consider having your belayer spot you until you make your first clip, or you could face a long tumble down the hill. Tipping Point’s first pitch is filled with dreamy climbing, once you unlock the hidden holds, and it ends at a huge belay ledge. Build an anchor, bring up your second, and then continue up. The crux comes at the top of the second pitch, where the slab turns vertical. Although it can feel challenging compared to the rest of the route, the holds are all there, the climbing is fun, and the position is fantastic.

The anchor on the first pitch is the perfect place to practice using the quad anchor. The quad is our go-to anchor on two-bolt anchors, and if you’re unfamiliar with it, check out this excellent video from the AMGA showing you how to use it.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Main Cliff Right: Charity Toad, 5.9

If you’re looking to beat the crowds on Model Citizen, Crowd Pleaser, and Tipping Point, check out Charity Toad. This three-pitch climb is the hardest of the Main Cliff Right’s multi-pitch routes, connecting Charity Case with the final pitch of White Toad via a short traversing pitch. White Toad’s final pitch is airy and very exposed—and definitely worth checking out.

Since you can access several climbs from the top of the first pitch, and the route’s second-pitch traverse crosses at least one more, Charity Toad’s first-pitch belay anchor is a great place to sharpen your route-finding skills. In addition to reading the guidebook, consider taking a screenshot of the route description and map with your smartphone. That way, you’ll have all the beta with you while you’re climbing the route. Of course, if you want to minimize any potential route-finding confusion, just climb the first two pitches of White Toad instead. But, since White Toad’s first pitch only goes on gear, you’ll have to bring your trad rack.

Have you climbed any of aforementioned routes? Tell us which one is your favorite in the comments.