What Do Guides Think About Before Ski Touring in Tuckerman Ravine?

Whether you’re a veteran backcountry skier or somebody who just read goEast’s Alpha Guide for Tuckerman Ravine and is now psyched to ski it for the first time, managing avalanche risk and planning for Mount Washington’s notorious winter weather can be tricky. With that in mind, we recently asked the EMS Climbing School’s Keith Moon, who has spent hundreds of days climbing and skiing on Mount Washington, to share some pointers on how to make a Tuck’s ski tour as safe and awesome as possible.

Keith Moon skinning the Tuckerman Ravine Trail. | Credit: Tim peck
Keith Moon skinning the Tuckerman Ravine Trail. | Credit: Tim Peck

Before You Go

A critical first step in planning a Tuck’s ski tour is to select and research your objective. In the process, investigate possible alternatives that are suitable to your party’s abilities and risk profile in case weather or avalanche risk preclude your intended route. Some good alternatives in the vicinity are the Gulf of Slides itself, as well as the Sherbourne and Gulf of Slides ski trails.

Another consideration is the style of tour that you’re going on. As he’s planning, Keith focuses on whether he’ll be backcountry skiing (looking for the best snow), ski touring (trying move across a significant distance), or ski mountaineering (climbing a specific objective and skiing down)—which helps clarify the goals for the day. Answering this question also helps ensure that he has the right equipment for the task—think big skis for powder hunting and lightweight skis for long-distance touring.

A few days before your tour, Keith recommends studying the Mount Washington Observatory’s Higher Summits forecast and the Mount Washington Avalanche Center’s avalanche report to get familiar with the existing conditions. Recent trip reports or conversations with local guides, snow rangers, and skiers are great ways to supplement your own research.

READ MORE: Reading Weather Reports for Mount Washington

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What to Pack

The night before your tour, pack gear appropriate for the objective and conditions. In terms of clothing, Keith prefers a four-layer system of a baselayer, an insulated midlayer, a hardshell, and a puffy. The weight of each layer often varies depending on the conditions, with lighter weight puffies and shells for spring-like bluebird days and heavier weight layers for cold or wet missions.

Keith’s pack also includes avalanche gear (beacon, shovel, and probe) as well as an ice axe, and crampons (essential gear for booting up an iced-up gully). Additionally, he packs a pair of ski goggles, ski helmet (it’s warmer and more protective than a climbing helmet), a first aid kit, bivy, repair kit, and food and water.

Getting Going

The morning of the tour, Keith recommends reading the MWAC’s daily avalanche report and Observatory’s weather forecast (which, in case you don’t have internet access, are also posted on the wall in the climber’s room at Pinkham Notch). As he does so, he refines his route plan, identifying aspects and elevations that he wants to avoid, observations that he’d like to make en-route, and alternatives in case the intended objective proves too risky.

Whether he’s skiing with friends or clients, Keith recommends having a group conversation about the day’s goals, risks, and hazards. He always encourages everybody to share their opinion, as it’s better to sort out divergent opinions near the parking lot instead of when you’re standing atop a gully, shivering from the windchill.

The Tour

On the skin up towards the Ravine, Keith recommends keeping an eye on the snowpack and the weather, as it may yield clues that support or detract from your earlier plan and forecast. Indeed, if you watch Keith while he’s skinning towards Hermit Lake, he’s regularly probing the snowpack on the side of the Tuckerman Ravine Trail with his ski pole searching for distinct layers in the snow, assessing stability by observing whether snow is sliding on inclines near the trail, and glancing at the sky looking for any weather changes (i.e., is the snowpack getting more sun or precipitation than expected or is the forecast bad weather arriving sooner than expected). If you’re not doing this too on your own tours, now is a good time to pick up the habit.

Another key to the day, and something that Keith focuses on with his clients, is good skinning technique. Gliding the ski along the snow, as opposed to picking it up like a snowshoe, is much more efficient and makes the uphill a lot easier. Not having wrecked legs is something you’ll be thankful for once you transition to the downhill.

Keith recommends that groups pause for a few minutes when they arrive at Hermit Lake. It’s a great spot to have a snack and layer up (if you haven’t already). If the visibility is good, it is also a great spot to make some visual observations of the Ravine, looking for any signs of recent avalanche activity. If they’re out and about, chatting with the snow rangers about conditions they’re seeing is another great way to garner some info.

Courtesy: Colin Boyd
Courtesy: Colin Boyd

Into the Ravine

From Hermit Lake, skiers have three main options: turn left towards Hillmans, head up into the Ravine, or, if the conditions have deteriorated, ski down the Sherbie. If the option is up, Hermit Lake is a great spot to make sure everybody is ready. What you don’t want to do, is head up, only to have to pause some minutes later, likely in the runout of a known avalanche path.

Heading into the Ravine, Keith tries to choose a route that minimizes the exposure to known avalanche paths. He’s also paying close attention to other groups, adjusting his path and objective to reduce the likelihood of being caught by a human-triggered release from above.

Whatever gully you’re heading up, Keith encourages keeping the skins on as long as possible. With the skis on, it’s easier to ski out of trouble and the floatation they provide allows you to avoid post-holing, a concern in the typically deep Tuckerman’s snowpack. Although skinning up a gully is tricky, learning to love the kickturn makes it a lot more manageable.

If skinning uphill becomes too tricky, find a safe spot to transition from skinning to booting. As you’re doing this transition, Keith recommends stripping your skins and having your skis ready to go, so that when you get to the top of the booter, it’s as simple as clicking into the skis and heading downhill. This helps minimize the time the group spends at the top of the gully, something that’s particularly helpful when the platform you stamp out is less than ideal.

Credit: Jamie Walter
Credit: Jamie Walter

Ski

This is the part everybody comes for, but it’s also not time to let your guard down. Keith advises skiing one at a time, from safe spot to safe spot, with the group leapfrogging down the gully.

If the gully bottoms out in the bowl, Keith likes to make sure everybody has agreed on the plan before they get there. Whether that means skiing out of the bowl down the Little Headwall to the Sherbie or transitioning for another gully lap, having a clear plan helps minimize the time standing in the runout of multiple avalanche paths.

Once back at Pinkham, it’s rinse and repeat for tomorrow (at least for Keith), but not before a quick debrief. That’s a great time to assess what went right, what went wrong, and terrain that’s suitable for next time, all topics that help improve everyone in the group’s risk assessment capabilities.

Jamming everything Ketih knows about Tucks is near impossible, luckily you can schedule some one-on-one time with him in the ravines by simply contacting the Eastern Mountain Sports School. Whether looking for pow or looking to refine technique, Keith is a wealth of knowledge and everyone from Tucks veteran to first-timers are sure to learn something from a day spent skiing with him.


3 Beginner-Friendly Ice Climbs in Crawford Notch

There’s no denying the great ice climbing found in the Northeast. The entire region is home to fantastic flows, even in the most unexpected places. However, one ice climbing destination stands out among the rest: Crawford Notch. With numerous test-piece climbs at Frankenstein Cliffs, a multitude of multi-pitch routes on Mount Willard, and the uber-classic Shoestring Gully on Mount Webster, it’s no wonder why this winter wonderland attracts ice aficionados from across the country. However, it’s not just ice climbing experts flocking to Crawford Notch—the area is also home to some of the best moderate ice climbs in the Northeast. Below are a few great destinations for newer ice climbers looking to gain experience on ice in Crawford Notch.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Willey’s Slide

With an easy approach and an abundance of low-angle ice (between four and six pitches of ice graded no harder than WI2), it’s no wonder why so many Northeast ice climbers have kicked their first steps on Willey’s Slide.

Willey’s Slide is the large slab on the side of Mount Willey. It is easily spotted above the aptly named Willey House while driving Route 302 as it winds through Crawford Notch, allowing climbers to get a sense of ice conditions before making the 15-minute approach. Parking for the slide is in the plowed pull-off just after the Willey House if coming from Conway (or before it, if heading south from the Highland Center). Leaving the parking lot, climbers will typically find a well-traveled path leading up the hill and eventually crossing the railroad tracks before depositing them at the base of the climb. Don’t over-layer in the parking lot or you’ll be roasting by the time you reach the slide.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Willey’s Slide is great for newer ice climbers as it offers numerous opportunities to increase or decrease the difficulty of the climbing. Climbers looking to challenge themselves will find the steepest climbing in the center of the slab, while the slab’s sides offer lower-angle, less-challenging climbing. Even better, climbers tackling the climber’s left side of the route can bail into the woods and onto the descent trail at almost any point if the climbing becomes uncomfortable. Speaking of the descent, there’s no need to rappel or make tricky v-threads to descend the climb; at the top, climbers can simply follow a normally well-packed trail through the woods to the base.

Two warnings about climbing at Willey’s Slide: First, it can get busy, as it is a popular destination for many of the area’s climbing schools, our EMS Climbing School included. Second, the slide has avalanched, so use caution after any heavy snow.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Silver Cascade

A short drive north on Route 302 is Silver Cascade, a gold-star route for those with aspirations of climbing the Northeast’s classic gullies. And, unlike Willey’s Slide, encountering hordes of fellow ice climbers here is a rarity.

Much like Willey’s Slide, Silver Cascade is easily viewable from the road making conditions easy to ascertain. In fact, the route begins at the intersection of the cascade and Route 302. Parking for the route is located at the top of the notch in a small lot just before the AMC’s Highland Center (if coming from North Conway). There’s also a lot directly across from Silver Cascade for summer tourists, but it is not always plowed and folks regularly get stuck.

Once on the route, ice climbers are treated to a wide variety of ice and conditions as they ascend the climb’s four to five pitches. Silver Cascade offers an ample amount of low-angle terrain with the most challenging sections rated no harder than an intermediate-ice-climber-friendly WI2+. After the initial steep, almost all the most challenging sections of Silver Cascade can be avoided, if less-experienced climbers don’t feel up to the challenge. Also, if anchors prove challenging, the climbing is taking longer than expected, or climbers feel like they are in over their head, bailing off the route is as easy as moving into the woods on climber’s right. After four to five pitches, the ice peters out and most climbers descend via a well-trod trail through the woods on the climber’s right side of the climb—once again negating the need to rappel.

One trick to having the best experience on Silver Cascade is to climb it before the snow begins stacking up or in low snow years—climbing Silver Cascade when there is lots of snow is still possible, it’s just more steep snow climbing and a little less fun.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Flume Cascade

Sharing the same parking lot as Silver Cascade is another moderately-graded frozen flow that is sure to please: Flume Cascade.

Similar in character to its neighbor, Flume Cascade delivers a wide variety of climbing, with steep curtains of ice, graded up to WI2+/WI3, interspersed with long sections of snow. Continuing for four to five pitches, the varied terrain on Flume Cascade (very easy initially, followed by several bulgy sections) makes for an engaging outing and is great training for tackling longer, more challenging adventures in Crawford Notch. Like the aforementioned climbs, the most challenging sections of Flume Cascade can be avoided by taking less-steep variations, and the woods on climber’s right (also the descent trail) provide a reliable bail-out option for almost the entire climb—although, you’ll want to try to make it to the top, as Flume Cascade concludes in a very cool cave-like feature.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Although Silver and Flume Cascade are rarely super busy, the variety of climbing options allow ample opportunity for more experienced climbers to pass novice parties—a luxury not found on all of Crawford Notch’s classic ice climbs. Additionally, the proximity of Flume Cascade to Silver Cascade along with the easy walk-offs for both climbs mean that many climbers can tick both routes—and between eight and ten pitches of climbing—in a day.

One word of caution for both Silver and Flume Cascades: these are active streams that are often running during even the coldest spells. Their volume tends to increase significantly (and quickly) if it rains, so be sure to head for the woods if liquid starts falling from the sky.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Do you have a favorite ice climb in Crawford Notch? Whether it’s a super-steep single-pitch line or a more moderate multi-pitch route, we want to hear about it—so tell us about it in the comments below.


How to Choose Snowshoes

Whether you’re heading into the mountains or just getting a little exercise, snowshoes are a key piece of gear for winter exploration. They make winter travel easier and more efficient by dispersing a person’s weight over a large surface area, providing flotation, and preventing them from sinking into the snow. Can’t figure out what snowshoe is right for you? Keep reading to discover which features and benefits are best for you in a snowshoe.

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Terrain

Snowshoeing means different things to different people. For some, snowshoes offer access to untracked powder deep in the mountains; For others, they are simply a way to enjoy the outdoors in winter. Because of this, snowshoes are designed to perform in a wide variety of terrain and applications, making the knowledge of how and where you’re going to use them one of the simplest ways to narrow down your snowshoe choice.

Hiking and Recreational Snowshoes

Designed to handle conditions encountered by the majority of users, recreational/hiking snowshoes are capable of handling all but the steepest and iciest terrain. They’re built for comfort and ease of use with enough traction and technical features to handle moderate terrain and hiking off the beaten track. Most snowshoes fall into this category.

Mountaineering and Backcountry Snowshoes

Mountaineering and backcountry snowshoes are designed for people going deep into the mountains and tackling demanding terrain. They feature more aggressive crampons (and, in many cases, serrated side rails and rear crampons) than hiking/recreational snowshoes for improved performance in steep and icy conditions. Since users in this category will be traveling far from civilization, mountaineering/backcountry snowshoes are built using burlier and more rugged materials and are typically field-repairable. Lastly, many snowshoes in this category have bindings designed to accommodate bulkier boots such as snowboard or mountaineering boots.

Running

Running snowshoes represent a small niche of the snowshoe market, but are popular for people looking to take a break from pounding the pavement during the winter. Running snowshoes tend to be shorter, narrower, and lighter than other snowshoe styles, sacrificing some flotation to facilitate a more natural running motion. Additionally, the bindings found on running snowshoes are designed to accommodate sneakers, rather than boots.

Pro Tip: To ensure your feet stay warm and dry, wear waterproof trail runners and ankle gaiters with your running snowshoes.

GO: Snowshoes for Gentile | Rolling | Steep Terrain

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Men’s, Women’s, and Children’s Snowshoes

Men’s (typically also considered unisex) snowshoes are designed for bigger bodies carrying heavier loads and come with bindings designed to fit larger boots. Conversely, women’s snowshoes are engineered for smaller people, lighter loads, and smaller feet. Women’s-specific snowshoes also frequently feature a tapered tail to account for a woman’s narrower stride. With that being said, many women can still be comfortable wearing a men’s/unisex snowshoe.

Children’s snowshoes vary by age, but most are built to be easy on and off. Snowshoes for younger children are typically made for backyard use rather than backcountry, but snowshoes designed for older children incorporate the technical features found on adult models.

GO: Men’s Snowshoes | Women’s | Kids’s

Courtesy: Tubbs Snowshoes
Courtesy: Tubbs Snowshoes

Sizing Snowshoes

Snowshoes work by dispersing a person’s weight over the surface area of the snowshoe—therefore, it’s important to get an appropriately-sized snowshoe for the load it will have to carry. Every snowshoe comes with a recommended weight range, which should be consulted before purchasing.

As a general matter, if you’re under 150 pounds (with gear), you should be looking at snowshoes in the 21 to 25 inch range. For folks between 150 and 200 pounds (again, with gear), consider a snowshoe in the 25 to 30 inch range. Finally, for individuals weighing more than 200 pounds (including gear), look for a snowshoe over 30 inches. Balance this, however, with the terrain you’ll be traveling in—in deeper snow you’ll want a bigger size, while on well-packed trails a smaller shoe will be easier to use.

Pro Tip: A good rule of thumb is to choose the smallest snowshoe available that is capable of carrying the load and handling the conditions you anticipate encountering, as smaller snowshoes are easier to walk in and weigh less than their larger brethren. This is especially true for hikers expecting to snowshoe predominantly on packed trails.

GO: 40-90 lbs.80-150 lbs. | 120-200 lbs. | 170-250 lbs. | 220+ lbs.

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Construction Type

Today’s snowshoes fall into two different types of construction: wrapped frame and plastic decking.

Wrapped Frame

Most snowshoes are constructed using the wrapped frame model. Wrapped-frame snowshoes take their cues from the traditional wood-and-leather snowshoes of the past, updated with more modern materials like metal and rubber. Wrapped-frame snowshoes deliver a nice balance of light weight and performance and are well suited for use in soft snow.

Plastic Decked

Plastic-decked snowshoes have become increasingly common in recent years. Unlike wrapped-frame snowshoes, plastic-decked snowshoes typically do not feature a separate frame—rather, the frame and deck are a single piece, making them more durable. Plastic-decked snowshoes are more packable than wrapped-frame snowshoes, but frequently are only available in one size, ruling them out for users headed for deep powder (although some modular snowshoes come with “tail”-like extensions).

There are a few exceptions when it comes to snowshoe construction, most notably the MSR Lightning series snowshoes. Rather than using a tube frame, MSR Lightning snowshoes feature a metal frame with serrated edges (and a rubber decking) to provide a snowshoe that blends the advantages of both wrapped-frame and plastic-deck snowshoes.

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Crampons and Traction

A clear indicator of a snowshoe’s intended use is the design of its crampon and the traction system. The more aggressive the crampon, the more advanced terrain it’s built for. For example, a basic recreational snowshoe might have a simple toe crampon, while a mountaineering snowshoe will feature a toe crampon, a heel crampon, and side rails for additional traction in steep terrain. More so, crampons designed for steep and icy terrain will also typically be more aggressively-shaped to provide purchase in gnarly terrain. It’s also common for snowshoes designed for more extreme terrain to be outfitted with traction systems made of more rugged materials—switching aluminum construction out in favor of steel.

Bindings

There are two things to consider when looking at a snowshoe’s binding: how it attaches to your foot and how the binding interacts with the snowshoe.

Manufacturers use numerous ways to connect the binding to your foot. In fact, it’s common to see multiple connection methods used on the same snowshoes. Popular binding closures are webbing straps, rubber straps, snowboard-like ratcheting straps, and Boa dials. Webbing and rubber straps are the most utilitarian binding systems (and allow for replacement in the field), while ratchet straps and Boa dials are more easily adjusted and easier to use.

Whether the snowshoe’s binding is “fully rotational” or “fixed” also impacts its performance. A fully rotational binding is attached to the snowshoe with a pivot or hinge and delivers a wider range of motion than what’s offered by fixed bindings. Rotational bindings allow for a more natural stride and make it easier to gain purchase on steep slopes.

Alternately, fixed bindings attach the binding to the snowshoe with a strap or band. Fixed bindings bring the snowshoe tail up with each step, making them ideal for activities like running where a rotating snowshoe could present a tripping hazard.

Heel Risers

Heel risers, also called heel lifts or climbing bars, have become increasingly common on many snowshoes and are particularly beneficial on mountaineering and backcountry snowshoes. Heel risers can be flipped up to support the heel when ascending steeper terrain, putting the foot in a more natural position for increased comfort and less strain.

 

Do you have a favorite snowshoe model or a suggestion for something new snowshoers should be on the lookout for? If so, we want to hear about it—leave your suggestion in the comments below!

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How to Keep Your Puffy Jacket Clean

Puffy coats are an essential part of every outdoor adventurer’s wardrobe. Whether you’re a hiker, skier, climber, or backpacker, one (or more) of these synthetic and down-filled jackets probably regularly finds its way into your pack. But with winter now upon us, you’ve also probably been wearing it so much that it begs the question: is your puffer clean? Because keeping your puffy clean improves its performance and increases its longevity, read on for a few tips to keep your precious puffy in pristine condition and, if it happens to get dirty, clean it up.

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1. Top of the Line

Stashing your puffy at the top of your pack offers a handful of advantages. Most notably, it keeps it easily accessible for when you stop—which is always a great time to add a warm layer for sudden shifts in temperature. From a longevity standpoint, stowing your puffer on the top of your pack keeps it out of harm’s way when shoving items in and out of your backpack. It also helps it avoid absorbing moisture from wet items in the pack, or from being doused by a leaky water bottle.

2. Hang in There

Speaking of storage, while many puffies on the market come with stuff sacks or stow in their own pockets, keeping them bundled up is not a good long-term solution. Keeping an insulated jacket compressed can cause flat spots and negatively affect how insulation lofts. Instead, hang your puffy up at the end of the day. It’s good for the disbursement of insulation and loft of your puffer, and also ensures that your jacket dries thoroughly between uses.

3. Look Sharp

Another easy way to keep your puffy jacket at peak performance is by simply being careful when handling sharp objects. Tuck ice axe picks into pick pockets or cover their sharp edges with Black Diamond Pick Protectors. When storing crampons, make sure to pack them with their points facing one another, or use the Black Diamond Crampon Bag to avoid accidentally puncturing your puffy. Carrying skis on your shoulder? Watch those edges!

Pro Tip: If you’re planning on wearing a puffy for a considerable amount of time—and conditions allow—consider adding a more robust layer, like a softshell, on top of the puffy for an extra layer of protection.

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4. Don’t Dig Yourself into a Hole

Despite our best efforts, it seems holes are inevitable on puffy coats (especially lightweight ones). Patching holes early is a good way to keep expensive insulation inside your coat and add years to your jacket’s lifespan. Duct tape is the old standby for many outdoors people, but it can actually do more harm than good since it can further tear the coat when removed, leaves a residue behind, and pulls the insulation out when removed. Instead, use a pre-cut Gore-Tex Patch or Gear Aid Tenacious Tape, both of which are easily stored in a repair kit.

Pro Tip: To avoid losing insulation or further damaging the outer lining, patch any holes on your puffy before washing it. Of course, if the material around the hole is truly filthy, spot cleaning it can go a long way to ensuring that the patch stays put.

5. Clean Up Your Act

No matter how careful you are with your puffy, the time will come when it needs a wash—dirt, oils, and, in some cases, beer all have a way of winding up on your jacket. Keeping your jacket clean is for more than mere aesthetics—it also improves the loft of insulation and revitalizes Durable Water Repellent (DWR) shells, keeping puffies functioning at the pinnacle of performance and extending their lifespan.

While cleaning a puffy can feel daunting, it is actually quite easy:

  1. Most companies advise using a front-loading washing machine for cleaning your puffy coat and warn against using top-loading washers. However, many newer top-loading machines do not use agitators—which can snag and rip delicate items like puffies. If you have access to a newer top-loading washer without an agitator, feel free to use it. No matter if its a front- or top-loader, use the gentle cycle. No washer? No problem, a bathtub or sink also works great.
  2. Get a cleaner designed specifically for your garment, such as Nikwax Down Wash. Traditional laundry detergents can strip down feathers of their natural oils and leave a residue on your jacket’s shell, both of which will negatively affect your coat’s performance. If you are washing a synthetically insulated puffy, a product like Nikwax Tech Wash both cleans insulation and restores the jacket’s water resistance, all without leaving a soapy, performance-inhibiting residue behind.
  3. After your puffy is done in the washing machine, throw it in the dryer on low heat. At low heat, drying a puffy can be a time-consuming process and it often requires a few cycles to get a puffy completely dry. Fight the temptation to speed up the process by jacking up the heat—too much heat can melt everything from the jacket’s outer shell to the synthetic insulation. It’s also possible to air dry a puffy, although it can take anywhere from a couple of days to a week. To air dry, simply lay your puffy on a towel in a warm, dry spot out of direct sunlight and occasionally flip the jacket over.
  4. To help your jacket maintain its loft, throw a few clean tennis balls into the dryer with it, as they aid in re-fluffing your puffy. If you’re hand drying, manually pulling apart insulation clumps can help restore your puffy’s fluff and speed up the drying process.
  5. While everyone loves a nice, clean puffy, it’s advisable to only wash them as needed. Washing can cause extra wear and stress to a jacket and shorten its lifespan.

Do you have any tips for keeping your puffy pristine? We want to hear them! Please leave them in the comments section below.

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52 (More) goEast New Year's Resolutions

As we approach the New Year, it’s natural to look back and reflect on the 12 months that just passed. And, while it’s fun to think about our favorite summits, trips, and trails from that period, it’s equally exciting to look ahead and plan what’s next. With that in mind, we’ve gathered some more of our favorite articles from the past year to put together the ultimate outdoor-focused list of New Year’s resolutions. Make these ideas part of your bucket list for 2019.

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Winter

  1. A few of the Unbeatable Speed Records in the Northeast were broken last year. Start training now to find out how fast you can go.
  2. Go winter camping in comfort.
  3. Hike the Adirondacks’ MacIntyre Range and summit three of the High Peaks.
  4. Visit one of these unique ice climbing crags.
  5. Start working on New Hampshire’s other list, the 52 With a View. They’re awesome in the winter, and you won’t encounter the masses found on some of the Whites’ most popular 4,000-footers.
  6. Hike the Lion Head, one of Mount Washington’s iconic winter routes.
  7. Pray for weekend pow, and ski the Whiteface Auto Road.
  8. Ice climb Shoestring Gully.
  9. Learn the dos and don’ts of climbing in the gym.
  10. Celebrate Presidents’ Day by getting presidential in the White Mountains.
  11. Take your skis or snowboard on a trip.
  12. Lighten up the dark days of winter by brightening up your wardrobe.
  13. You’re not going to send your project by sitting on the couch—start training at home and crush it at the crag this year.

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Spring

  1. Don’t stop skiing just yet.
  2. Give your gear room a spring cleaning.
  3. Hike Mount Monadnock, the world’s second-most popular mountain.
  4. Ski Tuckerman Ravine, the epicenter of backcountry skiing in the Northeast.
  5. Break out your mountain bike early.
  6. No need to wait for Rocktober—send something this spring.
  7. Tackle one of Connecticut’s top-notch trails.
  8. Leave the tent behind and camp in a hammock.
  9. Find out if your pup is man’s best friend or man’s best hiking partner.
  10. Vow to keep your mountain bike clean through mud season.
  11. Get outside: Take your climbing from the gym to the crag.
  12. See how it feels to use trekking poles on your next hike.
  13. Take your road bike for a century ride—that’s one hundred(!) miles.

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Summer

  1. Summit the Catskills’ two 4,000 footers—even better, do it in a day.
  2. Hike Mount Washington, the tallest peak in the Northeast.
  3. Paddle the Adirondacks’ Seven Carries Route.
  4. Be a better (nicer) hiker.
  5. Hike the Thunderbolt Trail to the top of the tallest peak in Massachusetts.
  6. Go alpine climbing on the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle.
  7. Kick back with a cold one, and enjoy one of these top brews.
  8. Tick five High Peaks off your list by traversing the Dix Range.
  9. Take the kids for a hike in the ‘Daks this summer.
  10. Prove that big views don’t require big elevations.
  11. Avoid these backpacking no-nos on your next multi-day trip. (Did somebody say Pemi Loop?)
  12. Stretch out your paddling season.
  13. New York City might be so nice they named it twice, but every now and then, you need to escape the Empire City.

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Fall

  1. See great foliage without ever leaving Boston.
  2. Layer up for cool fall temps and go climb High E in the Gunks.
  3. Take a backpacking trip to New Hampshire’s Carter Range.
  4. Get out of Gotham, and get to these fantastic fall hikes.
  5. Peep leaves at these Adirondack hotspots.
  6. Ditch the single-pitch crowds at Rumney, and explore the area’s multi-pitch moderates.
  7. Make stretching after a run your new mantra.
  8. Stop avoiding these New Hampshire 4,000-footers.
  9. Hike Vermont’s tallest peak, Mount Mansfield.
  10. Celebrate the season—vest weather is the best weather!
  11. Do it the old-fashioned way by ditching the digital camera and try taking photos with film.
  12. Take your running off road.
  13. Donate on Giving Tuesday to one of these great Northeast organizations.

Of course, these are just a few outdoor-oriented New Year’s resolutions. We want to hear about what’s in store for 2019, so leave your plans in the comments!


12 Things All Beginning Backcountry Skiers Should Know

Backcountry skiing is exploding in popularity. Need proof? Look no further than the new zones being created by advocacy groups, such as the Vermont Backcountry Alliance and the Granite Backcountry Alliance. Or, look toward ski resorts, which have expanded their uphill policies to take advantage of the enthusiasm people have for earning their turns. If you’re new to backcountry skiing, there is a lot to learn—new gear, new techniques, and new challenges, to name a few. But, follow these tips, and your first day will be a step closer toward being great.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

1. Know where to go

Sure, we all have dreams of sending the headwall in Tuckerman Ravine to the cheers of the crowd below. The reality is, though, a skier’s first days in backcountry gear are best spent uphilling at the resort, getting to know their supplies, dialing in technique, and becoming accustomed to transitions and the demands of going up and back down. After a few sessions at the resort, the bottom third of the Cog Railway, Mount Cardigan, or the Carriage Road on Mount Moosilauke is great for an initial backcountry outing.

2. Pick up a partner

There is no ski patrol in the backcountry—meaning, you’re on your own in the event of anything from an injury to an avalanche. A good touring partner turns into a valuable resource, as you’ll be counting on them for a rescue. Even better, find a more experienced partner and try to learn something new from them each time you go out. And, in addition to being safer, your uphill skins will go faster, runs will be more fun, and après beverages will be far tastier.

3. Don’t bonk in the backcountry

Just because you ski from bell to bell at the resort doesn’t mean you can, or should, in the backcountry. Your body requires a lot of calories to power uphill, keep warm, and shred the descent, so be sure to stay well fed when touring. While it’s easy to take frequent snack breaks during the warmer months, finding food you can eat on the move helps you stay warm and fueled in winter. If you prefer to stop, keep your puffy at the top of your pack, and put it on while you’re snacking.

EMS -Winter-Ski Mistaya Lodge -3734

4. Fuel up

While staples like Snickers, Clif bars, and GU fuel summer adventures, they often freeze when subjected to winter temperatures, making them impossible to eat—at least without breaking your teeth. Because of this, we prefer to pack cookies, crackers, mixed nuts, tortilla chips, and other foods that won’t freeze. But, if you just need to have that summit Snickers, pack it close to your body.

5. Leave the hydration bag behind

Much like staying well-fueled, keeping well-hydrated is important. Although hydration packs are convenient during the warmer months, they are prone to freezing in the winter. As a side note, we’ve tried all the tips and gadgets to keep hydration packs from freezing and have yet to find something reliable enough to trust.

Instead, we prefer good, old-fashioned, wide-mouth Nalgene bottles—the wide mouth inhibits freezing at the top of the bottle—packed into our puffy coats. Supplement your water bottle with a Hydro Flask thermos filled with hot chocolate or tea. Drinking something warm is an easy way to keep your core warm, and beverages like hot chocolate deliver the calories to keep you going.

6. Pack an extra set of gloves

Sweating, handling skis, and digging into the snow are just some of the ways gloves get soaked while you’re skiing in the backcountry. With this in mind, we always bring an extra set. We prefer one or two pairs of lightweight leather gloves for touring, a medium-weight pair for descending, and a heavyweight pair of mittens for extreme cold conditions.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

7. Have plenty of straps

Ski straps are an essential tool in any backcountry skier’s arsenal, as their uses are seemingly limited only by your imagination. Over the years, we’ve seen ski straps used to hold skis together, in lieu of a broken bootstrap, to keep frozen skins attached to skis, and in a multitude of first aid training scenarios. So, keep a few ski straps stashed in your pack. We keep one wrapped around a ski pole, one in our first aid kit, and one in our repair kit. Ultimately, you never know when you’ll need one, or how you will end up using it.

8. Save the goggles for the descent

There’s a reason nearly every ski pack has a dedicated goggle pocket. Specifically, when they’re not being used, goggles belong in your pack. One of the easiest ways to stand out as a newbie is to hike with a pair on your forehead. Added to this, getting to the top of a run, only to realize your goggles are perilously fogged over, completely sucks the fun out of your descent.

9. Perfect your technique

Perfecting your uphill technique does wonders for your climbing efficiency. Here’s one tip for doing so: glide, rather than step. Lifting your ski off the snow is a common rookie mistake. As well, it slows you down, sucks up more energy, and makes it more likely you’ll slip on the uphill.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

10. Downhill before uphill

When transitioning from up to down, click into your downhill ski first. Doing so keeps your gear above you and helps prevent it from sliding away. Equally important, this step makes it easier to click into your uphill ski. On steeper terrain, stomp out a solid platform using your skis before you transition from uphill to downhill.

11. Don’t forget about the in-between

It’s easy to solely think of the uphill and downhill parts, but a fair amount of time is spent transitioning between the two. This is especially true if you’re running laps at the resort or skiing in a smaller zone. Practice transitioning from uphill to downhill, and vice versa, to pick up precious minutes of ski time and avoid the cold that comes with stopping. It’s also a good idea to develop a pattern for transitions—doing the same things, in the same order—to avoid pitfalls like skiing half of a run with your boots still in “walk” mode.

12. Know how your gear works

Clicking into a tech binding is hard at first, so get some practice in your living room before you head out. More significantly, carrying backcountry essentials, such as a shovel, probe, and beacon, is not enough. Instead, learn how to use these lifesaving devices before they’re needed. So, make time before and during the ski season to refresh your skills—your and your partner’s lives may depend on it.

Pro Tip: If entering avalanche terrain is on your to-do list, consider taking an avalanche class. The EMS Climbing School runs both Backcountry Skiing 101 and American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE) classes throughout the winter.

Do you have any backcountry skiing tips for beginners? If so, leave them in the comments.


Gear Guide: What Your Loved One Needs to Rock Climb The Pinnacle

Winters in the Northeast are usually difficult for the climber on your holiday shopping list. With temperatures too cold for cragging and snow often blanketing the best boulders, many get their sending fix from the climbing gym’s warm confines. Although this provides temporary relief, the fluorescent lights, urethane holds, and chalk-filled air are no replacement for the freedom and fresh air found on an iconic alpine route like the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle on New Hampshire’s Mount Washington.

Just the thought of sending the route’s money pitch, the Fairy Tale Traverse, should be enough to get your beloved climber through a winter of dreary days battling the “pink problem” in the gym. However, if this individual needs more than inspiration, consider picking them up a key piece of gear to help make this dream line a reality.

Alpha Guides

1. The Beta

Moderately rated climbing and incredible exposure should be enough to put the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle on every Northeastern climber’s tick list. However, it’s the route’s location on the iconic Mount Washington that makes it a must-do. Considering Mount Washington’s fearful reputation, make sure the climber on your list knows what to expect with goEast’s “Alpha Guide: Climbing the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle”.

2. Best Foot Forward

For training for the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle, downturned and tight-fitting climbing shoes are a recipe for success in the gym—just not on the route itself. As a tip, read about choosing the right climbing shoes to understand the difference.

Sending an alpine route like this one means spending a lot of time in your shoes, so kicks that prioritize comfort and performance are a must. For a couple of options, Tommy Caldwell put the “TC” in the La Sportiva TC Pros, and used these shoes on his monumental climb of the Dawn Wall. For classic routes, the 5.10 Anasazi MoccAsym has been a staple for two decades.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

3. Protect Their Head

Alpine routes, even ones as well-traveled as the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle, have some loose rock. And, considering the climb’s classic nature, odds are the climber on your list won’t be the only party on the route—thus making a helmet mandatory. The Black Diamond Vector delivers an ideal blend of low weight and protection. Of course, if you really love the person on your list, consider trading up to the super-lightweight Black Diamond Vapor. After all, every ounce counts when you’re making the long approach up Huntington Ravine and the equally long descent down the Lion Head.

4. Weight Weenie

Unless your climber takes the “Euro Approach” (i.e., drives up the Auto Road), rock climbing only accounts for a third of the time climbers spend on this trip. The rest involves hiking up to and down from the climb, carrying a pack filled with layers, climbing gear, and food. In our Alpha Guide, we suggest bringing eight to 10 alpine draws on the trip, which you can help lighten up with ultra-light Black Diamond runners and super-light Camp Photons.

On top of the first pitch. | Credit: Tim Peck
On top of the first pitch. | Credit: Tim Peck

5. Pro Passive Protection

Modern climbers love cams for their ease of use. However, that comes at a cost—with that being weight. So, consider snagging the climber on your list some of Black Diamond’s Ultralight Cams (.5, .75, #1, #2, #3), which are considerably lighter than other modern options.

As another easy way to lighten your favorite climber’s load, supplement their rack with passive protection. Camp Tricams (.25, .5, 1.0, 1.5) are a lightweight and simple way to leave a few cams behind in the car. Stoppers also help keep pack weight down. As one example, this Black Diamond Stopper Set covers all of the sizes recommended in the Alpha Guide.

6. Wind Break

The exposed nature of the Pinnacle itself—along with the considerable amount of time climbers will spend hiking above treeline while crossing the Alpine Garden and descending the Lion Head—subjects them to the full force of Mount Washington’s record-setting winds. A quality wind shirt, such as the Outdoor Research Ferrosi Hoodie (men’s/women’s), is tough enough to fight off these extreme gusts and stand up to the route’s coarse granite.

7. Fancy Pants

The normal monthly average temperature on Mount Washington’s summit never exceeds 50 degrees. In fact, the record-high summit temperature is just 72 degrees. Because of this, a good pair of tough, wicking climbing pants is recommended. We love the prAna Men’s Stretch Zion Pant for its mobility and breathability. Our wives, meanwhile, love the Women’s Halle Pant for these reasons. Plus, their roll-up leg snaps are great for both warm approaches low on the mountain and cooler temps up high. As an added bonus, these pants are perfect for winter training sessions in the gym.

The Fairytale Traverse. | Credit: Tim Peck
The Fairy Tale Traverse. | Credit: Tim Peck

8. Hit the Bottle

It’s quite a trick to fit essentials like a rope, climbing gear, climbing shoes, a helmet, and multiple layers into a pack that is also comfortable to climb with. For this reason, we love HydraPak’s Stash Water Bottles. Providing the same capacity as a traditional Nalgene, these bottles collapse when empty, freeing up pack space. Even better, the Stash Bottle is significantly lighter than its hard-plastic competitors.

9. Celebrate the Send

Climbing an iconic route like the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle is worthy of celebration. As well, Pinkham Notch—the jumping-off point for the Pinnacle—is one of the Northeast’s great outdoor hubs. Once back in the parking lot, the climber on your list is sure to appreciate putting a cold one in the Yeti Rambler Colster to toast their ascent. The Rambler Colster is perfect for keeping drinks discrete and cold while you’re savoring success and watching other climbers and hikers amble into the parking lot from Mount Washington.

10. Send Them to School

If a trip up a dreamy line like the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle is something that the climber on your list would love to do but it seems a little over their head, consider contacting the EMS Climbing School. As the oldest climbing school on the East Coast, EMS has been guiding climbs and teaching skills for the past 50 years and offers everything from privately guided climbs to classes—such as learning to lead—that will give the climber in your life the skills they need to go at it alone.

Crossing the Alpine Garden. | Credit: Tim Peck
Crossing the Alpine Garden. | Credit: Tim Peck

Gear Guide: What Your Loved One Needs to Ice Climb Shoestring Gully

Winter is prime time for the ice-lover in your life. In fact, if you see the ice climber on your shopping list at all over the holidays, it’s probably due to a mid-winter thaw. While your favorite ice climber waits for the mountains to refreeze, fire up their stoke by putting Shoestring Gully—a 2,500-foot alpine climb in New Hampshire’s Crawford Notch—on their tick list. Even better, to tick a person off your shopping list, hook them up with a key piece of gear for sending this awesome route.

Alpha Guides

1.The Beta

Moderate climbing in an incredible surrounding makes Shoestring Gully popular with novice and expert ice climbers alike. This also means that the route can be crowded at times. So, give the ice climber on your list all the knowledge they need to send this superb route—including ideal places to pass slower parties—with goEast’s “Alpha Guide: Ice Climbing Shoestring Gully”.

2. Screw a Heavy Pack

For all the great ice climbing in Shoestring Gully, the trip involves as much hiking as it does climbing. To help the ice climber on your list lighten their load and reduce the amount of weight they need to schlep up and down the gully, hook them up with a few lightweight ice screws. Black Diamond Ultralight Screws and Petzl’s Laser Speed Light Ice Screws are both excellent choices for ice climbers who believe light is right.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

3. Harness the Stoke

If the climber on your list is fairly new to the sport, they might need to upgrade their harness to something more winter friendly. Options like the Petzl Adjama and Petzl Women’s Luna feature adjustable leg loops, allowing them to easily accommodate a variety of layers. Furthermore, both come equipped with five gear loops that deliver more than enough room to store winter climbing essentials. As a bonus, they’re compatible with Petzl’s Caritool Evo Holder (an awesome stocking stuffer, by the way), a special tool designed for holding ice screws.

4. Moving Comfort

For tackling long ice lines like Shoestring Gully, keeping warm and staying in motion are two of the main challenges. Because of this, puffies using active insulation are preferable. Unlike with traditional puffers, which are worn at belays and put away before climbing, active insulation pieces like the EMS Alpine Ascender Stretch and Outdoor Research Ascendant Hoody (men’s/women’s) breathe when you’re on the move, and keep climbers warm when they’re hunkered down at a belay. All this adds up to being comfortable, moving fast, and going onto the next big climb.

5. Keep Your Tools on a Leash

In recent years, leashless ice axes have become the norm. While they hugely improve maneuverability, they may be a liability on long routes like Shoestring Gully: In a moment of inattentiveness, one might disappear hundreds of feet below. Luckily, an umbilical leash, like Black Diamond’s Spinner Leash, provides climbers with the best of both worlds—the unrestricted movement of leashless ice tools with the security of a leashed tool.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

6. Shell Game

A midweight softshell, like the Black Diamond Dawn Patrol (men’s/women’s), blends the perfect amount of warmth and weather protection with the toughness needed to stand up to sharp ice axes, pointy ice screws, and the rough walls enclosing Shoestring Gully. Made with stretchy material for easy movement and harness-compatible pockets, this softshell is built for sending.

7. Warmest Regards

The main challenge of any winter alpine climb is keeping warm, and Shoestring Gully is no exception. Factor in metal ice axes, screws, and climbing gear, all of which help conduct the cold, and restricted blood flow—from over-gripping axes—that seems to happen every time the ice gets steep, and you’ll soon recognize your hands are particularly susceptible. The easiest way to keep them warm is with a high-quality, super-insulated pair of mittens, such as the Outdoor Research Men’s Altitude (men’s/women’s). Match them with Yaktrax Hand Warmers, a chemical hand warmer packet that keeps everybody’s hands toasty and, in this case, also makes the perfect stocking stuffer.

The optional WI3 finish looking thin. | Credit: Tim Peck
The optional WI3 finish looking thin. | Credit: Tim Peck

8. Drink in More Than the View

Another excellent way to stay warm on winter climbs like Shoestring Gully is with a thermos of hot chocolate or tea. The Hydro Flask 32 oz. Wide Mouth is durable enough to withstand going in and out of a pack, and it keeps contents warm for up to 12 hours. Similarly, the Hydro Flask 18 oz. Food Flask is rugged enough to live in your pack, will keep food hot for up to three hours, and is perfect for someone who prefers tomato soup to tea.

9. The Gift of Speed

Harness, helmet, crampons, ice tools, rope, and layers are just some of the items the ice climber on your list will need to make it up and down Shoestring Gully. Additionally, they’ll need a pack like the Black Diamond Speed Zip 33 to transport it all. The Speed packs are staples in New Hampshire’s White Mountains, thanks to their just-stripped-down-enough build that delivers everything climbers need without the frills. Featuring ice tool pick pockets, crampon straps, a tuck-away rope strap, and a removable hipbelt (so the pack won’t interfere with a harness), the Speed Zip 33 is made for missions like these. It’s also worth considering a Black Diamond Toolbox and Crampon Bag, to protect the pack from sharp crampon points.

10. The Gift that Keeps Giving

If a trip up Shoestring Gully sounds like something the person on your list would like to do, but you don’t think they’re up to the challenge themselves, enlist the services of the Eastern Mountain Sports Climbing School—the oldest climbing school on the East Coast. The EMS Climbing School offers everything from private trips, where they’ll guide you up Shoestring Gully, to lessons like Intermediate Ice Climbing, which are designed to teach the skills needed for tackling routes such as this one on your own.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

Gift Guide: What Your Loved One Needs to Hike Mount Monadnock

Every year in stores, everyone fights over and goes crazy trying to get that one popular present. Luckily, while the hordes seek out the latest gizmos and must-have toys, you can help the person on your list reach the summit of one of the world’s most popular mountains: New Hampshire’s Mount Monadnock.

Mount Monadnock’s fairly close to major metropolitan areas—it’s just a two-hour drive from Boston and less than five hours from New York—and also offers year-round accessibility. These factors have made it the world’s second-most popular mountain—it draws more than 100,000 hikers per year, just behind Japan’s Mount Fuji, which saw more than 240,000 hikers in 2016. With a trek roughly four miles out-and-back along the iconic White Dot and White Cross trails, most hikers can easily summit this peak. Thus, a few key pieces of gear go a long way.

Alpha Guides

1.The Beta

Provide the inspiration to tackle this bucket list-worthy hike and summit one of the world’s most popular mountains with goEast’s “Alpha Guide: Hiking Mount Monadnock’s White Dot and White Cross Trails.”

2. Block The Wind

Don’t allow the sheer number of would-be summiters and comparatively low elevation (3,166 feet) belie Mount Monadnock’s seriousness. Rather, its prominence is greater than many of New Hampshire’s 4,000-footers. For this purpose, a rain jacket is nice, but a high-quality, lightweight shell, like the Black Diamond StormLine Stretch (men’s/women’s), is a more-than-welcome addition to any hiker’s kit. Through the holiday season and beyond, it helps the wearer stay warm and dry on Monadnock’s treeless upper slopes.

Credit: Tim Peck

Credit: Tim Peck

3. Get a Grip

Solitude on the mountain is hard to find on busy weekends, but quiet moments can be found, especially during the winter. For such journeys, traction devices like the Kahtoola MICROSpikes are vital for navigating the packed snow found at low elevations and the icy stretches on the mountain’s upper third.

4. No Shade

As you travel up the White Dot and down the White Cross trails, you’ll find a substantial portion of your hike is above treeline. As such, a good pair of polarized sunglasses is needed to protect your beloved hiker’s eyes from the sun and wind they will surely encounter. We love the Julbo Renegade for their ability to transition from Monadnock’s summit to the patio at Harlow’s in Peterborough.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

5. Protect Yourself

No matter the season, sustained time above treeline also means extended exposure to the sun. For these conditions, a UPF-rated wicking shirt, like the Black Diamond Alpenglow Sun Hoody (men’s/women’s), helps protect the hiker on your list from the sun’s harsh rays. As a bonus, the Alpenglow’s hood is great for fending off the fierce winds common above treeline.

6. Puffer Jacket

“Monadnock” is an old Abenaki word that loosely translates to “mountain standing alone.” And, with its presence rising above flat fields and woodlands at its base, it’s easy to see how the mountain received its name. Because of the mountain’s prominence, the summit is often cold and windy, even in the summer months. However, no matter the time of year, the hiker on your list will appreciate a lightweight, packable puffy, like the EMS Feather Pack Hooded Jacket (men’s/women’s). It’s sure to keep them cozy.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

7. Accessorize

Because of the potential for cool weather on Monadnock’s summit, a lightweight winter hat, like the Smartwool NTS 250 Cuffed Beanie, and gloves, such as the EMS Power Stretch (men’s/women’s), are welcome additions to any hiker’s pack, no matter the season.

8. Get Transcendental

Two authors, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, spent significant amounts of time in the region. As such, both have recognized “seats” on the mountain. To encourage the hiker on your list to make the short diversion to “Emerson’s Seat” and “Thoreau’s Seat,” put them in a Transcendental mood with a copy of either author’s work. Or, print out a copy of Thoreau’s The Mountains in the Horizon—which opens with verses in praise of Monadnock—for them to read when they get to these special places. And, since Thoreau definitely would have embraced selfies, hook the hiker on your list up with a dry bag, like the Big Agnes Tech, to keep their smartphones and cameras dry in the event of inclement weather.

Credit: Tim Peck
Credit: Tim Peck

9. Stay Hydrated

Whether you’re struggling up a steep incline, kicking back behind a summit windbreak, or staring out at the landscape from “Thoreau’s Seat,” it’s easy to get distracted and forget to drink enough. For this reason, hydration packs, with the hose right in front of you at all times, are perfect for this trip. Even if the person on your list already has one, they most likely are ready for a new bladder, like the Camelbak Crux 2L Reservoir.

10. It’s a Picnic

Jaffrey, New Hampshire—the gateway town to Mount Monadnock—is a far cry from a typical mountain town. As such, it’s a challenge to find a nearby place for a post-hike beer or meal. Instead, bring the après scene to the hiker on your list: Hook them up with a Mountainsmith Deluxe Cooler Cube, a Yeti Rambler Colster, and a Helinox Chair One.


Northeast Organizations to Support on Giving Tuesday

The days after Thanksgiving are the busiest shopping days of the year. In fact, two are so busy they get their own designations: Black Friday and Cyber Monday. But, while everybody loves sweet deals on gear, don’t forget to support the organizations that protect the places where we recreate and explore. Although you can do this at any time during the year, Giving Tuesday opens up this opportunity. Without these organizations, we wouldn’t have glades to ski, cracks to climb, trails to hike, or scenic vistas to admire. So, keep reading to discover some of the great local organizations that could use your support.

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Climbing Organizations

Whether you prefer to clip bolts at Rumney, pull roofs in the Gunks, traipse on Connecticut traprock, or think the nicest climbing is found in Western Mass, a handful of great groups represent climbers in the Northeast. In recent years, the Rumney Climbers’ Association has worked to purchase and protect numerous crags at the Northeast’s mecca of sport climbing, in addition to constructing parking lots and attempting to ease congestion. For those who prefer placing gear, the Mohonk Preserve in New York helps preserve and protect the Gunks’ iconic routes, boulders, and trails.

Of course, plenty of smaller organizations work to protect local and lesser-known crags. The Western Massachusetts Climbers’ Coalition works tirelessly to secure and protect access at numerous crags. Their efforts have included purchasing land to ensure parking at Farley Ledges, a popular sport, trad, and bouldering destination.

In Connecticut, the Ragged Mountain Foundation owns 56 acres of conservation land in Southington. Notably, those 56 acres include the Ragged Mountain climbing area, which is home to routes established by various climbing legends, including Fritz Wiessner, Layton Kor, and Henry Barber. Giving, however, won’t make your project any easier.

Finally, if you find yourself regularly visiting routes like the Lion Head Winter Route or the Northeast Ridge of the Pinnacle, consider supporting the folks who will help you out if you ever run into trouble—the Mountain Rescue Service in North Conway.

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Skiing Organizations 

Backcountry skiing’s recent popularity has led to crowding at many Northeastern destinations. Luckily, a handful of organizations help skiers gain access to and maintain new terrain. In New Hampshire, the Granite Backcountry Alliance has opened up numerous glades and helps maintain well-established trails, like the Sherburne and Gulf of Slides trails. Speaking of Mount Washington, don’t forget the Mount Washington Volunteer Ski Patrol. This 140-member strong volunteer organization provides wintertime first aid and rescue to skiers injured on the mountain and in the ravines.

In Vermont, the Vermont Backcountry Alliance has also been working to preserve and protect existing ski terrain while opening up new areas to skiers. Equally interesting is the work being done by Ascutney Outdoors. They’ve kept slopes of the former Ascutney Mountain Resort open to those who want to earn their turns and mark and maintain a vast network of XC ski trails.

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Mountain Biking Organizations

The New England Mountain Bike Association (NEMBA) has been a fixture in the Northeast since 1987. Consisting of 27 chapters spread across New England with more than 5,000 members, NEMBA does everything from holding weekly rides to creating, preserving, and maintaining trails. NEMBA even purchased 47 acres of land in 2003 to protect the popular “Vietnam” trail system in Central Massachusetts, becoming the first mountain bike group in the country to own its own property.

The Kingdom Trails Association has worked alongside 90 local landowners in Vermont’s Northeast Kingdom to create one of the best bike trail networks in the country and continues to grow that vast (and awesome) network. Another fantastic Vermont-based organization, the Waterbury Area Trail Alliance, part of the larger Vermont Mountain Bike Association, works to build some of the Waterbury region’s best bike trails.

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Hiking Organizations

The Appalachian Mountain Club (AMC) is seemingly synonymous with hiking—especially to those in New Hampshire’s White Mountains. And, while their high mountain huts and visitor centers draw a lot of attention, the AMC has been promoting the protection and enjoyment of the outdoors since 1876. Another fantastic New Hampshire organization, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests is dedicated to preserving some of the region’s most significant landscapes and vistas.

The Appalachian Trail passes through all but one New England state (sorry, Rhode Island). Thus, the Appalachian Trail Conservancy (ATC) has been a part of the trail from the beginning. Since 1925, the ATC has protected, maintained, and celebrated the nation’s premier footpath.

More locally, groups like Friends of the Wapack and the Monadnock-Sunapee Greenway Trail Club are helping to preserve some of New England’s lesser-known long trails and green spaces. Speaking of the Long Trail, don’t forget about the Green Mountain Club, the founder and maintainer of the Long Trail, the oldest long-distance hiking trail in the U.S.

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Paddling Organizations

The Northeast is packed with awesome places to paddle, and numerous nonprofits are helping to keep waters clean and access open. In Massachusetts, the Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA) works with officials, groups, and people in 35 watershed towns from Hopkinton to Boston to protect this well-used waterway. Operating since 1965, the CRWA has played an important role in the Charles’ ever-improving condition.

Another fantastic paddling organization is the Maine Island Trail Association. MITA created the country’s first water trail, which runs along Maine’s rugged, beautiful coast for 375 miles from the Maine-New Hampshire border to the Canadian border.

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Other Outdoor Orgs Doing Great Things

While we love supporting groups that support the places and things we love, plenty of other great groups use the outdoors in interesting and impactful ways. In North Conway, New Hampshire, the Kismet Rock Foundation teaches rock climbing to vulnerable children before they reach their teens.

From the 1930s to the 1950s, New England was the epicenter of skiing in the United States. The New England Ski Museum—with locations in Franconia Notch and North Conway—is working to collect, conserve, and share the region’s rich ski history. With exhibits ranging from the 10th Mountain Division to housing Bode Miller’s Olympic Medals, the museum is worth both a visit and a donation.

Surfers Healing assists people with autism by introducing them to surfing. As inspiration for the organization, co-founder and pro surfer Israel “Izzy” Paskowitz (son of legendary surfer Dorian “Doc” Paskowitz) discovered the calming effect riding waves had on his autistic son, Isaiah. While not a local org, Surfers Healing runs numerous camps throughout the Northeast and is always looking for support from the paddling community.

For Giving Tuesday, are there any outdoor groups we forgot to mention? If so, leave the organization in the comments, and tell us why we should support them!