Alpha Guide: Cadillac Mountain’s South Ridge Trail

Go way east and take in one of Maine's rugged coastal peaks during this staple Acadia hike.  At 1,530 feet, Cadillac is the tallest mountain on the United States’ Atlantic coastline, offering incredible views of Maine’s rugged seashore from the top. If you want to be among the first people in the continental United States to see the sunrise, there is no better place to view it than from...

Alpha Guide: Camel’s Hump via the Burrows Trail

Climb to one of Vermont's most imposing, rugged alpine summits in just a day or less.  Looming over Interstate 89, Camel’s Hump draws thousands of hikers every year to its undeveloped, alpine summit. At just under five miles and gaining roughly 2,500 feet in elevation, the Burrows Trail is a great way to hike Vermont’s third tallest peak. It delivers everything you would expect to find...

Alpha Guide: Mount Marcy via the Van Hoevenberg Trail

Towering over New York State at a cloud-splitting 5,344 feet, Mount Marcy is a breathtaking Northeast peak and an iconic wilderness hike. Climbing Mount Marcy is a rite of passage for many area hikers, whether it’s a personal goal on its own or a small piece of the pursuit to become an Adirondack 46er. Beginning from the High Peaks Information Center (HPIC) at the serene Heart Lake, this...

Alpha Guide: The Presidential Traverse

This Northeast classic is one of the region's most sought-after trips, and for good reason. The Presidential Traverse is one of the most challenging and beautiful point-to-point hikes in the Whites, and the Northeast at large. It summits up to eight of New Hampshire’s 4,000-foot mountains—including the five tallest in New England—with the most notable being the iconic Mount Washington....

ALPHA GUIDE: The Pemigewasset Loop

One of the Northeast’s great backpacking adventures proves that good things don’t come easy. The Pemi Loop represents the ultimate goal for many New Hampshire peak baggers. It traverses the ridgelines of three different ranges—Franconia, Twin, and Bond—in one epic loop around the western half of the 45,000-acre Pemigewasset Wilderness. With its eight summits and the potential to tick four...

A Hiker’s Guide to Nuts

We’ve all been there. You’re out hitting the trail for a weekend hike with friends, pushing steadily upward, and suddenly, fatigue starts creeping up through the soles of your feet. As you turn the corner on what seems like the thousandth switchback, you become hyper-aware of the burning in your thighs and the layer of sweat gluing your shirt to your back. "We’ve gotta be close now," you...

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→ Find out what stories we're looking for today.  The northeast forged our heritage. What we sell, the gear we make, the values we cherish, who we are: all of it comes from experiences among granite, spruce, birch, mud, mosquitoes and friends. No, the wild, tree-flanked summits may not be as high and the enclosed trails are poorly trodden, but they’re what we call home. Our home. These...

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11 Tips for Staying Warm While Backpacking in Fall

When you’re in the backcountry during the shoulder seasons, it's no fun to wake up freezing cold in the middle of the night. You can't just “turn up the thermostat” or grab an extra blanket from the closet. So, since shivering uncontrollably is only fun for so long, here are 11 tips for staying warm: 1. Wear dry clothes to bed If you go to bed in the shirt you’ve been sweating in all...

Pads Fly Free: The Sea to Summit UltraLight Sleeping Pad

Two summers ago, we were preparing for a trip to California’s Mount Shasta. Our group of four had plans to climb up multiple routes—Avalanche Gulch as a “warm up” and then either Casaval Ridge or a glaciated route on the mountain’s north side. But, as we began to pile the gear into duffels for our cross-country flight, we realized we had a problem: We needed to bring a lot of gear. As...