10 Tips to Tackle the New Hampshire 48

Some of us are goal-oriented hikers. It’s nice to have some larger objective to work on and have something to guide and motivate us to get out more. If you live in the Northeast, and especially if you enjoy hiking New Hampshire’s peaks, making your way to the top of all of them is a seriously worthy objective.

New Hampshire has 48 peaks at 4,000 feet or more in elevation, all of which are serious undertakings individually. But, put them all together into one big to-do list? That’s a goal that takes some serious dedication and hard work.

Each year, hundreds of people hike their way through these lists, exploring different routes and trails and getting well-acquainted with peaks and places that had only been names on a map before. And, at the end, it would be hard to deny finishers are some of the most experienced, expertise-packed hikers in the state.

Interested in starting your own checklist of the New Hampshire 48? According to our experts, there are just a few special things you should know:

Credit: Hannah Wholtmann
Credit: Hannah Wholtmann

1. Buy the AMC White Mountain Guide

The most recent copy of this essential guidebook has all of the most up-to-date information on trails, great views, time estimates, mileage, and other key factors. It also comes with folding maps that are helpful to check out before the hike. And, in the back, you’ll find a complete checklist of all 48 peaks for you to tick off. You can also find the official list here

2. Join a Facebook group for local hikers 

A page like “Hike the 4,000 footers of NH!” is a constantly updated, crowdsourced resource. Recent information like road closures and trail conditions is always easy to find. Plus, the group serves as a massive community and a great, experienced pool of people to ask questions and get advice.

You can also use websites and forums like trailsnh.com, newenglandtrailconditions.com, and vftt.org for up-to-date trail conditions.

3. Check the weather

Keep an eye on it a week before, a day before, the night before, and the morning of your hike. The White Mountains’ notorious weather can change in an instant, so it’s best to monitor it as much as possible to avoid surprises and keep you safe if it looks like it might turn ugly. 

Courtesy of Hannah Wohltmann
Courtesy of Hannah Wohltmann

4. But don’t always be deterred by it!

If you wait for good weather on every hike, however, you’d never finish. As long as you have the right gear, getting after it in inclement conditions, like rain, can be just as fun. And, it will show you a whole other side of the mountains you’re climbing.

Obviously, don’t go hiking when it’s stormy or too rough, but a little rain never hurt! Similarly, don’t let the winter slow you down. For this latter point, get a pair of snowshoes first, and take to peaks like Mount Pierce and Mount Hale to make the leap into winter hiking.

5. Take on your list with friends

If the motivation for completing all 48 peaks isn’t enough, having friends with which to work through the list adds an extra level of excitement and drive. Encouragement when the trail gets tough or even when you’re not feeling up to hiking can go a long way. Plus, an adventure with friends, especially when you complete such a major accomplishment, can be extremely rewarding.

6. Pick a mountain to finish on

Your final hike is a big day, so plan ahead to make it special. Do some research to figure out which mountain you want to do your celebrating on.

7. Don’t forget other peaks!

They may not be as tall, but New Hampshire (and the Northeast at large) has plenty of other mountains just as enjoyable as the New Hampshire 48. Hike a shorter one like Mount Cardigan or Mount Willard, or even head over to New York and start ticking off their Adirondack 46. Don’t lose sight of all the other great things to do in the region!

Supermoon
Mount Washington during a Presidential Traverse under a supermoon. | Credit: Ryan Wichelns

8. Double-, triple-, or quadruple-up!

48 mountains don’t have to become 48 hikes. Lots of these peaks are close enough together that you can (or might even have to) swing through multiple ones in a day, thus saving you time.

If you’re feeling really ambitious, think about taking on something like the Presidential Traverse. With one very long day, you can bag eight of the largest on your list, plus a few extras, and it’s as rewarding of a day hike as you’ll find anywhere. For longer trips, the route also makes a great weekend overnight.

Peter Barr, all smiles as he finishes four lists at once on top of Mount Carrigain. | Courtesy of Peter Barr
Peter Barr, all smiles as he finishes four lists at once on top of Mount Carrigain. | Courtesy of Peter Barr

9. Join the community!

Aside from being recognized for your major accomplishment, as well as getting a scroll and a cool patch to sew on your backpack, joining a club of hikers more than 10,000 strong is a solid opportunity to contribute to a great organization and support group.

They also offer recognition if you go on to complete all of New England’s 67 4,000-footers or if you complete New England’s 100 highest peaks. They also recognize those hearty souls who brave the elements and dare to climb both lists’ peaks in winter.

Once you finish one of these lists, following just a couple of steps will make it official:

  1. Simply visit the AMC Four Thousand Footer Club’s webpage, and fill out an application.
  2. Be sure to include the date of your final peak, as well as a brief account of one meaningful hike you had along the way.
  3. Submit a $10 application fee, so you can receive your scroll, which is personalized to include your name and completion date, and your patch. 

NH48 Patch

10. Get recognized!

Each year, the Four Thousand Footer Club has a reunion and recognition ceremony for list-finishers at the end of April in Exeter, New Hampshire. This year, EMS is supporting the event, giving away dozens of raffle prizes and celebrating alongside hundreds of accomplished hikers. Not a finisher? No problem: The event is free and open to all, and is a great opportunity for meeting aspiring hikers to get into the game.

Please visit their website for more details, and come to the event at Exeter High School on April 22nd to see what hiking the New Hampshire 48 is all about!