10 Reasons to Wear Sandals During Your Next Adventure

The dog days of summer are fast approaching. Historically, August brings some of the warmest, sunniest days of the year to the Northeast, and it’s prime time to enjoy the abundance of its hikes, camping opportunities, and paddles. By now, you’ve peeled your active wardrobe down a few layers to just a T-shirt and shorts, and you’ve traded the beanie out for a ball cap. But, if you haven’t already, now is also the time to swap out the shoes for sandals—and not just for long walks on the beach or the backyard barbecue. If you need convincing, here are 10 reasons you should consider making sandals your first pick for any summertime multi-sport adventure.

1. Greater freedom of movement

Sandals have no barriers to cram your toes. When you’re wearing boots and shoes, this sensation can be especially painful when you’re descending a mountain (hello, black toenails). An open toe box also eliminates those nagging hot spots on your forefoot.

2. They’re lightweight

Less material than a fully enclosed shoe automatically makes sandals a lighter option compared to hiking boots and sneakers. For those who are especially stoked on the fast-and-light mentality, sandals take this to extremes, cutting down on weight while keeping essential aspects there, like traction and support.

3. More room to grow

Many things may cause your feet to temporarily swell, including high temperatures and exercising. Wearing sandals thus gives your midfoot and forefoot more space if comfort is your primary goal.

4. Leave the smelly socks at home

That’s right. You can ditch the socks for the trip and not risk getting athlete’s foot or smelly shoes. By design, sandals are ultra-breathable, so your feet can sweat. In turn, you don’t have to rely on socks to regulate temperature or moisture like you would if you were wearing a boot or hiking shoe.

5. They’re ideal for wet conditions

Do your summer plans have you traversing a river? How about a paddling trip where you’ll be portaging your boat? For these journeys, sandals are often a first choice. You don’t have to wear socks—they’ll inevitably get soggy—and they dry much quicker than a hiking shoe. As well, many active sandals have a lugged or slip-resistant outsole that performs well on slick surfaces.

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6. Barefoot without the danger!

Many people love to go barefoot in the summer, whenever possible. If it weren’t for sharp rocks, glass, and animal scat on the trails, I’d say follow your heart and ditch footwear altogether. However, some of these factors can really ruin your fun and even sideline you for the rest of the season. Sandals provide a solid compromise, offering protection underfoot and still exposing your feet to the elements.

7. They’re easy to take on and off

Put your shoe horns away. Sandals are far less complicated to put on and take off than lace-up shoes. For this reason especially, sandals make excellent approach shoes to the crag or the trailhead before the terrain becomes too gnarly. Most styles utilize a one-handed closure system, making for a fuss-free transition to more sport-specific footwear.

8. They’re packable

Sandals do not have a rigid exterior, thus making them more compressible and easier to fit into your backpack or luggage. Don’t have any space left in the bag? No problem. Just attach the sandals’ straps to your pack’s daisy chains or gear loops. 

9. Skip the laces

As I mentioned earlier, sandals do not utilize a traditional lace-up system. As such, there’s nothing that will eventually fray and break, and need to be replaced. It also means your laces won’t come untied and trip you mid-stride.

10. They’re exceptionally durable and supportive

Multi-sport sandals are constructed with a sturdy rubber outsole and a supportive midsole, while their straps are either made of strong polyester webbing or leather. In short, these aren’t your grade-school jelly shoes, and they’ll reliably last through many journeys.

 

Don’t sell your other shoes to a consignment store just yet, though. The aforementioned reasons are not meant to cloud your better logic. If your activity requires specialty footwear—as with cycling and rock climbing—do not substitute them with sandals. Additionally, if you will be going on a long trek or will be doing some serious bushwhacking, even the sportiest sandals aren’t enough. Your feet and ankles require a greater degree of protection and support.

Sandals have evolved to meet the needs of more than just the beachcombers, and are now a practical option for many of your recreational endeavors. To those with hesitation, I encourage you to take a walk on the wild side this summer, and even out those sock tans.

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